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Nobilis Animus

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Casual around the house or casual out and about?

The unfortunate truth is that they are probably going to become more and more popular in both for reasons of 1) expanding western waists and 2) complete trend focus on casualization and comfort.
Never understood why the comfort idea doesn't seem to extend to mental comfort, really. Sometimes the most socially casual thing isn't very comfortable to wear, in that sense.

Sweatpants are something I could never wear, but the waistband idea makes me curious. And that's coming from someone with a trim waist as it is.
 

ValidusLA

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Never understood why the comfort idea doesn't seem to extend to mental comfort, really. Sometimes the most socially casual thing isn't very comfortable to wear, in that sense.

Sweatpants are something I could never wear, but the waistband idea makes me curious. And that's coming from someone with a trim waist as it is.
I don't really understand it either. I own a pair of cashmere sweatpants to wear around the house when I have insomnia, but I can't imagine wearing them to the store or anywhere else.

Some people really don't care though. My wedding comes to mind often when thinking about "mental comfort" in being casually out of place. We did black tie, and i'd say about 300 out of 350 guests were in traditional black tie attire, and then most of the rest were close. One female guest (who was part of my like "party friends" from college) came in a very short leopard print dress. She....obviously didn't really understand what was going to be there and was visibly mortified once she saw what the event was. She even apologized to my wife (who of course didn't care and said it wasn't a big deal). Another guy (older) showed up in cargo shorts and a wrinkled polo - he was way casual, like 5 steps beyond anyone else and very clearly didn't care or think it mattered.

TL;DR - I can never tell from where the casual drive comes - if its "I don't care" or "I don't know" or an active attempt to "break" more formal norms.
 

BPL Esq

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Never understood why the comfort idea doesn't seem to extend to mental comfort, really. Sometimes the most socially casual thing isn't very comfortable to wear, in that sense.

Sweatpants are something I could never wear, but the waistband idea makes me curious. And that's coming from someone with a trim waist as it is.
I agree. For me, I derive some 'mental comfort' and/or a boost in optimism/confidence when I feel well dressed, experience the silhouette benefits of a tailored jacket, etc. I might be more physically comfortable in sweats and some shearling slippers (like I see a lot of people wearing to the mall and other places), but I would also feel like a bit of a dirtbag and be self-conscious the whole time.
 

BPL Esq

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I don't really understand it either. I own a pair of cashmere sweatpants to wear around the house when I have insomnia, but I can't imagine wearing them to the store or anywhere else.

Some people really don't care though. My wedding comes to mind often when thinking about "mental comfort" in being casually out of place. We did black tie, and i'd say about 300 out of 350 guests were in traditional black tie attire, and then most of the rest were close. One female guest (who was part of my like "party friends" from college) came in a very short leopard print dress. She....obviously didn't really understand what was going to be there and was visibly mortified once she saw what the event was. She even apologized to my wife (who of course didn't care and said it wasn't a big deal). Another guy (older) showed up in cargo shorts and a wrinkled polo - he was way casual, like 5 steps beyond anyone else and very clearly didn't care or think it mattered.

TL;DR - I can never tell from where the casual drive comes - if its "I don't care" or "I don't know" or an active attempt to "break" more formal norms.
I don't want to be 'that guy,' but I'd be really, really tempted to deny the cargo short guy entry. Immensely disrespectful to your hosts to completely ignore their desired dress code that way (it would be a different matter if the guy reached out in advance and couldn't afford to buy or rent a tux and asked if a suit was OK, or something like that).

Edit: Obviously, I understand if this was an elderly family member or something and you wouldn't want to cause rancor. Nonetheless, barring the interference of senility, it's really bad form.
 

ValidusLA

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I don't want to be 'that guy,' but I'd be really, really tempted to deny the cargo short guy entry. Immensely disrespectful to your hosts to completely ignore their desired dress code that way (it would be a different matter if the guy reached out in advance and couldn't afford to buy or rent a tux and asked if a suit was OK, or something like that).
I get you. If he was one of my friends I would have told him to go change, but he was one of my FIL's invites. And since my FIL paid for the wedding I certainly wasn't going to get into that.

Most people contacted me ahead of time, both men and women, asking what to wear - and a lot of people who didn't own or want to rent a rig wore suits and that was totally fine.

I was mostly just amazed at how much this guy stood out negatively and just....didn't care.
 

Nobilis Animus

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I don't really understand it either. I own a pair of cashmere sweatpants to wear around the house when I have insomnia, but I can't imagine wearing them to the store or anywhere else.

Some people really don't care though. My wedding comes to mind often when thinking about "mental comfort" in being casually out of place. We did black tie, and i'd say about 300 out of 350 guests were in traditional black tie attire, and then most of the rest were close. One female guest (who was part of my like "party friends" from college) came in a very short leopard print dress. She....obviously didn't really understand what was going to be there and was visibly mortified once she saw what the event was. She even apologized to my wife (who of course didn't care and said it wasn't a big deal). Another guy (older) showed up in cargo shorts and a wrinkled polo - he was way casual, like 5 steps beyond anyone else and very clearly didn't care or think it mattered.

TL;DR - I can never tell from where the casual drive comes - if its "I don't care" or "I don't know" or an active attempt to "break" more formal norms.
Sounds like he was the wedding snob. It's hard to avoid those.

Honestly, I don't think the more casual atmosphere today has anything to do with the 'democratizing' of clothing or a lazy attitude, but more a combination for the past few decades of wanting to break from anything that suggested you were tied-down to a particular lifestyle, and a desire to piss off the boomer generation in general. Very broadly-speaking, of course.

I think that these days a vintage/alternative/classic-with-a-twist vibe is on the rise. There are definitely a lot more stylish younger Millennials and GenZers today, and the whole normcore-Gap-boringly-beige-and-blue aesthetic is delightfully dead. There's a lot more willingness to look for and wear classic versions of casual items and to discover old school styles again and re-interpret them - but for themselves personally, and not for a political ideology, no matter what three talking-heads-with-a-blog might say.
 

ValidusLA

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but more a combination for the past few decades of wanting to break from anything that suggested you were tied-down to a particular lifestyle
I agree with this wholeheartedly.

and a desire to piss off the boomer generation in general
I used to think this was a big part of it, but now I wonder. Gen-Z/iGen seems to be more into that then Millennials, whereas Millenials (of which I am one on the older end) seem more interested in the first part.

There are definitely a lot more stylish younger Millennials and GenZers today, and the whole normcore-Gap-boringly-beige-and-blue aesthetic is delightfully dead
True! And thankfully!
 

Gus

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I took about 12 pairs of smart casual trousers to the tailor, all Summer weight, and had the inseam hemmed 1.5" higher. I no longer want any break in them during the warm weather. I like the cooler flow of air and the look of a shorter inseam after decades of long and plenty of break.
 

Duke Santos

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I don't really understand it either. I own a pair of cashmere sweatpants to wear around the house when I have insomnia, but I can't imagine wearing them to the store or anywhere else.

Some people really don't care though. My wedding comes to mind often when thinking about "mental comfort" in being casually out of place. We did black tie, and i'd say about 300 out of 350 guests were in traditional black tie attire, and then most of the rest were close. One female guest (who was part of my like "party friends" from college) came in a very short leopard print dress. She....obviously didn't really understand what was going to be there and was visibly mortified once she saw what the event was. She even apologized to my wife (who of course didn't care and said it wasn't a big deal). Another guy (older) showed up in cargo shorts and a wrinkled polo - he was way casual, like 5 steps beyond anyone else and very clearly didn't care or think it mattered.

TL;DR - I can never tell from where the casual drive comes - if its "I don't care" or "I don't know" or an active attempt to "break" more formal norms.
I grew up in Reno. When I went home from abroad for my grandmother's funeral in the mid-90s, my uncle's wife's brother wore a snap button Western shirt with a bolo tie. I was half ready to go full Tony Soprano and garrote him with his own tie.
 

clee1982

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Went to office fist time since feb/mar 2021, think I was one of the 3 guys in suits, about 75% is same as before (ie same business casual no worse), though 25% definitely have gone lower, and most partner have lowered a notch too
 

EUtroll

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I've done two trips back to the office this year and was actually surprised by the number of men in suits and ties in the area. A bit surprised given how casual the level is on the Zoom calls.
 

TheChihuahua

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I've done two trips back to the office this year and was actually surprised by the number of men in suits and ties in the area. A bit surprised given how casual the level is on the Zoom calls.
I think a lot of people are going to continue to wear professional attire in the office.
I wouldn’t be surprised if the pandemic actually helps boost it.

1. People like nice things, this includes looking nice. Just generally speaking. The idea of sweatpants at work isn’t really nice. Sure you can buy expensive sweatpants, but that’s sort of a novelty. As opposed to investing in a few nicer work items that have more longevity.

2. Suits and professional attire is easy. Sure it’s an initial investment, but once one has a professional wardrobe, it’s the easiest way tk dress every morning. Grab a suit and a shirt and match some shoes and perhaps a belt and take a minute to tie a tie and you’re done. No stress about wondering if something is appropriate, or wondering if your outdated or stale (ie, you have been wearing it too often). Professional attire doesn’t really go stale, you just rotate it and accessorize if you want.

3. I think the whole work at home thing, dress down thing, etc…, has some fatigue to a degree.
people want to distinguish from this odd time.
while some might head back to the office a bit more casually, over time I think people will embrace being back at work and step up their wardrobe.

it’s sort of like the revival of professional wear maybe 15 years ago. What happened? Business casual became mainstream about 20-25 years ago. Khakis and a button down became the uniform. But a lot of peopke got fatigue of that uniform, and suddenly dressing up business casual by wearing sports coats or dress trousers and such, or even going back to suits, became more of a trend.
 

norMD

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I just recieved spier and Mackays new solaro suit. Their version is with a newly developed solaro version from drago. The red yarns shine through and provides a proper iridiscent effect.

I have not handled solaro earlier and I was surprised with just how iridiscent the fabric is.

Those of you who own solaro suits, when and how do you wear and pair them? I Wonder if a plain gabardine suit would be much more wearable...?
 

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