MC General Chat

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by dieworkwear, Aug 4, 2012.

Tags:
  1. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

    Messages:
    9,457
    Likes Received:
    3,716
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    MCers - Is it ok that I think I prefer single vent over side vents?

    It's something that I'm considering for when I eventually go bespoke. As much as I feel that side vents are the interweb-approved option, every jacket I own has felt better when it's centre-vented. OTOH, that could be coincidental and more related to fit.

    I know it's not historically true, but I do feel as though centre vents feel more SC-y, and side vents ever so slightly more formal.
     
  2. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

    Messages:
    7,676
    Likes Received:
    12,436
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Center vents are definitely more comfortable if you commute by horse. Most of all for the horse, possibly. I approve.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2012
  3. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

    Messages:
    9,457
    Likes Received:
    3,716
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    On a non-sack suit suit, would it look weird?
     
  4. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

    Messages:
    7,676
    Likes Received:
    12,436
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    I would prefer more vents even if I were in a sack riding something.
     
  5. Itsuo

    Itsuo Senior member

    Messages:
    468
    Likes Received:
    149
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2012
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    I have actually gone for no-vent most of the time with my bespoke orders. I did it at first because I thought it would silhouette better than vents, I read this is why black-tie wear is often without vents. But in all honesty I notice little if any difference from when I wear a single or double vented jacket. Do vents really make that much difference? I'm starting to think (like with many things) it just comes down to personal aesthetic preference.

    I'm currently ordering an overcoat, clearly I'm including a vent in that.
     
  6. Naka

    Naka Senior member

    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    461
    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Anyone own a bottle/hunter green blazer? It might look a bit PGA to some people, but I think it would be quite versatile with some patch pockets and texture to the fabric.
     
  7. Holdfast

    Holdfast Senior member

    Messages:
    10,562
    Likes Received:
    6,339
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    I would say that if you prefer the look, then why not choose the single vent? No-one beyond us clothing nerds notices these things much anyway.

    I might also suggest that your intended single vent odd jacket would then pair quite naturally with slanted pockets and an outer ticket pocket too, should you already be thinking in that direction.

    Having said all that, as you cited fit as one of your considerations when choosing between the two, it's worth saying that you shouldn't really notice much difference in the fit itself between the two if you're going bespoke. Both versions will be cut so the cloth lays almost flat - apart from the depth of the folded cloth/lining/etc - regardless of the style. But if you prefer the look & feel of a single vent on an odd jacket, then pick it.

    I used to have a forest green DB blazer, with enamelled buttons. Frequently got Masters comments here on the board when I wore it (but not IRL, mind you) but I still liked it. I'm not sure I'd ever commission such an item from scratch, but it was surprisingly versatile. I could wear it with almost any outfit that would have otherwise paired well with a navy blazer. The darker the green, the easier it will be to integrate into an existing wardrobe. My forest green shade was about the limit (it was darker than the golfing shade, by way of reference); I suggest if you go this route, get an even darker/richer green (i.e. similar to the shade of dark green you sometimes see in smoking jackets).
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2012
  8. thinman

    thinman Senior member

    Messages:
    4,926
    Likes Received:
    40
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    

    If I were in the sack riding something, I wouldn't be wearing anything at all ;-)



    Single or double vents is personal preference, but I wouldn't go with no vents because unvented jackets bunch up when I sit down. For my overcoat, my tailor insisted on a single vent, based on tradition, IIRC.



    JLibourel has a green blazer and has written much the same about its versatility. It's apparently just as versatile as navy, but virtually unique (in a good way).
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2012
  9. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

    Messages:
    7,676
    Likes Received:
    12,436
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    In an effort to be helpful and not just a bad comedian, I don't see why single or double vents would be more comfortable. However, double vents are generally favored because they lay better when you sit down, and help retain a clean line when you put your hands in your pocket. I also just think they look better on almost everything but American suits (which don't necessarily have to be sack) and blazers. I'm not sure you can safely swap it around on whatever bespoke commission you'd like either. A jacket that's very Neapolitan in every other detail would look strange with a single vent, for example.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2012
  10. gdl203

    gdl203 Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,696
    Likes Received:
    17,041
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    

    and dinner jackets / tuxedos
     
  11. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

    Messages:
    9,457
    Likes Received:
    3,716
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    

    Ah, see that's the thing. I would definitely not go for slanted pockets or a ticket pocket. And I'm considering it for suits as well as sport coats.


    Yeah, that's the issue I'm worried about.

    I would be leaning towards what appears to be (from my internet reading) a Huntsman style cut. It would have strong, roped shoulders, be 1 button, straight pockets with flaps. This is for a suit.
    I kinda don't like the way double vents look like a bumflap...
     
  12. gdl203

    gdl203 Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,696
    Likes Received:
    17,041
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    I'd go double vented for a suit like this but I guess you can go single vented if you have such a dislike for side vents
     
  13. bourbonbasted

    bourbonbasted Cyber Eliitist

    Messages:
    4,027
    Likes Received:
    1,629
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2011
    Unlined sleeves fail. This is one of the strangest things I've ever seen.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2012
  14. gdl203

    gdl203 Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,696
    Likes Received:
    17,041
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    Most likely white lining of the sleeves coming through the fresco / hopsack weave. I've posted a bout this a couple years ago when it happened to me on a WW Chan commission and I had to send it back to have the lining and canvas dyed.
     
  15. bourbonbasted

    bourbonbasted Cyber Eliitist

    Messages:
    4,027
    Likes Received:
    1,629
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2011
    Interesting. I suppose it makes sense. The white shirt makes it look like you can see right through. I find it hard to believe that Mariano didn't notice this. Especially when he was wearing the jacket to the opening of a new shop. But I suppose it could be inadvertent.

    I don't think I've ever seen white lining on a dark, loose weave fabric. Both of my navy frescos have navy lining. I assumed a manufacturer/tailor would realize how transparent the material is naturally and plan accordingly. Guess not so much.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2012

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by