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Despos

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Il faut souffrir pour être belle.
You could have used the neutral form rather than the feminine here. You know SF has standards to maintain

il faut souffrir pour être beau.
 

Nobilis Animus

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You could have used the neutral form rather than the feminine here. You know SF has standards to maintain

il faut souffrir pour être beau.
Indeed, but I prefer the feminine. It bothers the insecure.
 

dieworkwear

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As far as pure cotton jackets (non-velvet), I can definitely see some use for them. At least where I am, summers can get quite humid and a cotton or linen jacket is great for brunches, beaches, etc. I'm actually not so hung up about wrinkles.

One jacket I own that has sparked a bit of inspiration is a mixture of 85% cotton and 15% linen. It's more of a 'work jacket' than sports coat, but the material is fantastic. The linen lends rigidity, while the cotton prevents it from wrinkling very much. I think a similar blend would be ideal for a blazer, but I'm not sure if it's widely available.
I don't think cotton suits are actually that great for summer because cotton tends to be tightly woven. I think you'd be better off in an open weave wool, assuming you want to wear tailored clothing. Cotton tends to be tighter, like canvas or twill, and I think better suited to spring and fall weather.
 

Nobilis Animus

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I don't think cotton suits are actually that great for summer because cotton tends to be tightly woven. I think you'd be better off in an open weave wool, assuming you want to wear tailored clothing. Cotton tends to be tighter, like canvas or twill, and I think better suited to spring and fall weather.
Good point. If you have a summer with refreshing breezes, an open weave makes more sense. I practically die in the humidity, no matter what I wear.
 

Nobilis Animus

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I thought this was interesting. Seems insidious on one hand and somewhat inescapable on the other.

It was probably inevitable when you take into account the amount of online shopping being done today, but also because people will shop and browse from their phones where it's harder to be kept from being tracked.

I do think that this general surge towards trying to deliver an in-person experience through virtually reality is going to backfire tremendously. The restrictions for in-person shopping won't last forever, and there's a reason bookstores and the rest, at least in Toronto, are lobbying tirelessly to be allowed to open again: people don't know what they want.

A lot of sales are made on the spot, and people will be craving the real shopping experience afterwards. These companies are banking on what people say ("I'm staying away from everything!") instead of what they do (going out to restaurants and stores immediately after they open again). This move to online shopping is one of necessity, but people don't like it.
 

smittycl

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It was probably inevitable when you take into account the amount of online shopping being done today, but also because people will shop and browse from their phones where it's harder to be kept from being tracked.

I do think that this general surge towards trying to deliver an in-person experience through virtually reality is going to backfire tremendously. The restrictions for in-person shopping won't last forever, and there's a reason bookstores and the rest, at least in Toronto, are lobbying tirelessly to be allowed to open again: people don't know what they want.

A lot of sales are made on the spot, and people will be craving the real shopping experience afterwards. These companies are banking on what people say ("I'm staying away from everything!") instead of what they do (going out to restaurants and stores immediately after they open again). This move to online shopping is one of necessity, but people don't like it.
I can handle the online tracking but the in-store digital snooping is a bit Orwellian.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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I've never understood why people are so sensitive about this specific type of data. Medical records, yes. Criminal records, also yes. But shopping data? People have been tracking shopping data for decades, even pre-internet (why do you think stores give you club reward cards?). And yet, we all seem OK.
 

mak1277

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I've never understood why people are so sensitive about this specific type of data. Medical records, yes. Criminal records, also yes. But shopping data? People have been tracking shopping data for decades, even pre-internet (why do you think stores give you club reward cards?). And yet, we all seem OK.
+1

As long as my true PII isn't compromised I couldn't care less what retailers know about me.
 

smittycl

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I've never understood why people are so sensitive about this specific type of data. Medical records, yes. Criminal records, also yes. But shopping data? People have been tracking shopping data for decades, even pre-internet (why do you think stores give you club reward cards?). And yet, we all seem OK.
Yeah, no problem in general but once it crosses into mass data collection and hyper-targeted ads and rewards to influence behavior it gets creepy for me.

“We noticed you stood by the flannel shirt rack for 10 min so here’s a coupon for one!” or “We noticed your phone outside the teen girls fitting room for 10 min so we told the FBI!”
 

Nobilis Animus

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I think what people resent is targeted advertising, more than anything. Having a salesman know your shopping habits before even speaking to you, for example. That verges on an invasion of privacy.

It's not wholly dissimilar from that same salesman knowing what you bought before because you're a regular and he takes notice, but the difference there is that one of these is built upon a relationship with another person. Perhaps you also do not wish for the store database to display your sizes, average expenditure, etc., quite so blatantly for just anyone to see.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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Yeah, no problem in general but once it crosses into mass data collection and hyper-targeted ads and rewards to influence behavior it gets creepy for me.

“We noticed you stood by the flannel shirt rack for 10 min so here’s a coupon for one!” or “We noticed your phone outside the teen girls fitting room for 10 min so we told the FBI!”
I don't have a problem with things influencing my behavior. This is capitalism (work for money) and socialization (social capital for good behavior). Individuals are nothing without groups, and groups set up reward systems to influence individual behavior.

I don't see targeted ads as a bad thing, as I would rather get ads that suit my interests than ones that dont. But if someone was purchasing things that fit the profile of someone who's about to do something bad, I would also want the government to do something about it. If you're buying stuff to make a huge bomb, I would hope the police knocks on your door.
 

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