• STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Masters degree subjects

Sir Humphrey Appleby

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 28, 2011
Messages
1,929
Reaction score
73
Looking at doing a Masters as a back up to a military career, thinking about one of Maths, Actuarial Science, Finance or some specific type like Mathematical Finance or Corporate Finance etc, or some banking shit.

A career using maths for a private company (engineering or banks) would probably be more enjoyable for me, but the others might lead to more money - what are job opportunities like in actuary and finance and what sort of job would each 'division' of finance and banking lead to? If I did go for a masters and then joined the army might my degree be seen as less worthy if I got it several years earlier?

I have an average grade in a maths degree from a fairly well respected university btw.
 

why

Distinguished Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
9,733
Reaction score
406
When people say 'maths' it's like nails on a chalkboard to me. The word is singular. Its abbreviation shouldn't have the last s attached to it. You wouldn't say 'hippos' when referring to one, would you?
 
Last edited:

Blackhood

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2010
Messages
2,903
Reaction score
371
Maths is short for mathematics. Math is short for Mathematic. His use was correct, you are an American.
 

Pliny

Distinguished Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2009
Messages
3,905
Reaction score
8,162
When people say 'maths' it's like nails on a chalkboard to me. The word is singular. Its abbreviation shouldn't have the last s attached to it. You wouldn't say 'hippos' when referring to one, would you?
'Hippos'? - it's a false analogy. Would you contract 'physics' to 'physic'? If you did, you'd get an entirely different noun referring to something about which Einstein knew very little.

It's 'maths' in English speaking countries, including England of course. 'Math' is an exception used only in English-speaking US.

'Mathematics' is a singular noun ending in 's', of which 'maths' is a contraction.
 

why

Distinguished Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
9,733
Reaction score
406

'Hippos'? -   it's a false analogy.  Would you contract 'physics' to 'physic'?  If you did, you'd get an entirely different noun referring to something about which Einstein knew very little.

It's 'maths' in English speaking countries, including England of course.  'Math' is an exception used only in English-speaking US.

'Mathematics' is a singular noun ending in 's', of which 'maths' is a contraction.  

Hippo is short for hippopotamus. Math is short for mathematics. Both are Greek. They should follow the same pattern.

'Physics' and 'physic' are not abbreviations. Why would you say my analogy is false (when it's clearly not), then reply with an even more absurd analogy?


Maths is short for mathematics. Math is short for Mathematic. His use was correct, you are an American.

Mathematic isn't a noun. Following the analogies of all the abbreviations of Greek words (and really all words in general), 'math' should be the abbreviation for mathematics.

I know I am an American. The problem is 'maths' as an abbreviation for 'mathematics' makes no sense. It sounds like people are treating mathematics as a plural (and likely the abbreviation into 'maths' originated through this mistake).

Yes, I know this is how you speak. I also know it sounds ridiculous to me. My reasons are stated pretty clearly.
 
Last edited:

the shah

OG Yamamoto
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
17,174
Reaction score
12,349
wow great help to OP fellas :lol:

SHA , I don't think you need masters to actuarial, just the exams (which get progressively more difficult) but that seems like the most uninteresting one considering what information you've provided. but if you do go the route of actuarial sciences, since relatively so few people go that route, job opportunities should be aplenty but in the realms of insurance, real estate, etc, and not necessarily only finance/banking. risk analysis seems like something you'd really have to enjoy doing though ...

A degree in applied math or financial engineering would probably be quite useful in terms of landing an analytical job with a financial institution. hopefully this gets thread back on track
 

Sir Humphrey Appleby

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 28, 2011
Messages
1,929
Reaction score
73

When people say 'maths' it's like nails on a chalkboard to me. The word is singular. Its abbreviation shouldn't have the last s attached to it. You wouldn't say 'hippos' when referring to one, would you?

maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths

wow great help to OP fellas :lol:
SHA , I don't think you need masters to actuarial, just the exams (which get progressively more difficult) but that seems like the most uninteresting one considering what information you've provided. but if you do go the route of actuarial sciences, since relatively so few people go that route, job opportunities should be aplenty but in the realms of insurance, real estate, etc, and not necessarily only finance/banking. risk analysis seems like something you'd really have to enjoy doing though ...
A degree in applied math or financial engineering would probably be quite useful in terms of landing an analytical job with a financial institution. hopefully this gets thread back on track
Cheers, what sort of job titles would finance/banking degrees lead into and what's financial engineering? Applied maths sounds good to me :fumup:
 

Pennglock

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2006
Messages
3,513
Reaction score
571
Why not a phD in Economics or Finance? Seem like they would lead to more interesting opportunities (that actually use math.)
 

munchausen

Distinguished Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2009
Messages
8,195
Reaction score
2,228
My college roommate was a math major and went on to get his masters in bio-statistics. He does really well doing research for an HMO.
 

Joenobody0

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2010
Messages
2,401
Reaction score
275

Check out Operations Research as a major.

Good suggestion. It's also known as Industrial and Operations Engineering (IOE). Stay away from Actuarial anything. If you want to go into the actuarial field (which I wouldn't suggest), all anyone cares about are CAS or Life exams.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

Most Interesting Fashion Collaboration of 2020

  • JW Anderson x Uniqlo

  • Nigo x Virgil Abloh

  • Converse x Midnight Studios

  • Rick Owens x Champion

  • Barbour x Engineered Garments

  • Adidas x Bed JW Ford

  • Jordan Brand x Dior

  • Billie Eilish x Takashi Murakami

  • Lego x Levi's


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
446,848
Messages
9,665,923
Members
201,965
Latest member
radekus
Top