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Mass modification of cover letter for every job: worth it?

imageWIS

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So my resume has several versions depending on the particular position I am applying to, so I have no need to modify it for every job application. However, other than changing the name of the company I am applying to in the cover letter, should I tailor every cover letter to each specific position? Is it worth the time or are most HR people going to simply go straight to the resume?
 

ter1413

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Just make sure that you spell check as you DIDN'T in your thread title!
Ever=EVERY
 

Teacher

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I've always done it and have always advised others to do so. Even in exactly the same industry, each job will have variations. Tailor your CL not just to the job (per the job posting) but also to what you may know about the company, the city, etc.
 

imageWIS

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Originally Posted by Teacher
I've always done it and have always advised others to do so. Even in exactly the same industry, each job will have variations. Tailor your CL not just to the job (per the job posting) but also to what you may know about the company, the city, etc.

Well, the city stays the same, but how much should I mention about the company? I don't want to make the cover letter too long.
 

Valor

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I prefer an 11 page resume with a video. Also, I make sure to tape some washingtons on top to make it classy.
 

burningbright

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On a side note, I would not recommend using email as the primary form of delivery unless you personally know the particular person you're sending it to. I would recommend finding out the name of the HR person responsible for the hiring and hand-deliver it.

I know that every position that opens up at my company can get hundreds of email responses and often times they just get deleted. By showing up personally to hand-deliver something you're at least separating yourself from the pack. It's a pain, but these are painful times.
 

Ambulance Chaser

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Originally Posted by Teacher
I've always done it and have always advised others to do so. Even in exactly the same industry, each job will have variations. Tailor your CL not just to the job (per the job posting) but also to what you may know about the company, the city, etc.
I agree. You also want to include, generally in the first paragraph, how you learned of the job opening to which you are applying.
 

bryanayrb

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Originally Posted by ter1413
Just make sure that you spell check as you DIDN'T in your thread title!
Ever=EVERY


i don't think ever would show up on spell check as it is also an honorary member of the english language
 

MrGoodBytes

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I've always written each cover letter specifically for each application and heavily customized my resume as well.... make it look like this is the only job you are applying for and only because they stood out. You don't want to come across as a mass mailer.
 

Merlino

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I'm currently in my first job. Applied for jobs at about 6 different companies. Wrote 5 distinct cover letters. For one company I only changed the name of the company and some details because there was a deadline and I was short on time. That was the only company of those six that didn't invite me for an interview.
 

kwilkinson

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I've always done it. Explained a little bit I knew about the company and what about that intrigued me and made me want to work there. But it could work differently in the restaurant industry, where in general things can be a little less "professional" and still be accepted.
 

ter1413

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Originally Posted by bryanayrb
i don't think ever would show up on spell check as it is also an honorary member of the english language

No ish....
Was a joke......
 

Gus

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I've probably hired 500 people in my career. Do what Teacher says. Form cover letters are boring and show no particular interest in the job.
 

imageWIS

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Originally Posted by burningbright
On a side note, I would not recommend using email as the primary form of delivery unless you personally know the particular person you're sending it to. I would recommend finding out the name of the HR person responsible for the hiring and hand-deliver it.

I have walked into a few HR departments before, suit on body, resume in hand, only to be told to apply online.

I know that every position that opens up at my company can get hundreds of email responses and often times they just get deleted. By showing up personally to hand-deliver something you're at least separating yourself from the pack. It's a pain, but these are painful times.
See above. I have never, ever been given the opportunity to leave a resume for the HR Manager in charge of hiring for a specific position. As well, as of late I have completely unable to find out from HR Departments who is hiring for which specific job; they are simply unwilling to provide the information.
 

Aaron

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Originally Posted by imageWIS
As well, as of late I have completely unable to find out from HR Departments who is hiring for which specific job; they are simply unwilling to provide the information.
Why are you going through HR?

I've always talked to the manager I would be working for first. Found out more about the job, see if I like them, etc. then sent my resume to the manager and HR. Just my .02 cents.
 

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