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Management Consulting Discussion

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Artisan Fan, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. fuji

    fuji Senior member

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    Lol this reminds me of applying for IBD "I want to work with clients to help create a unique solution to their financial problems" or when I was particularly interested in restructuring "I find the variety of debt products fascinating in how they can all be structured into creating a unique solution for the clients needs". I go through financial statements pic out numbers, put them into excel templates, make everything into the "house aesthetic", get bitched at because it's slightly off then remember my pie chart is supposed to use yellow for the largest section. No real difference between energy or pharma. I can't imagine MC is all that different.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. MSchapiro

    MSchapiro Senior member

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    MC will have considerably more variety in what you do and how you solve problems than IBD. In general IBD will have a couple points along the process where you need to be creative, but MC can have far more.
    That, of course, isn't to say in any way that it is easier.
     
  3. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    ^^ This is true for several years of your career. Then at some point, you start to see that no matter how you package it up, its always the same shit, and get tired of it.

    /BurnedOutConsultant

    On a serious note, at the junior levels, it is indeed pretty rote, but honestly, every industry is going to be like that.
     
    2 people like this.
  4. otc

    otc Senior member

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    The one thing I was nervous about back when I was applying for internships (or maybe jobs...I don't remember...it was all back before I went for my niche instead), was getting to siloed into something.

    It seemed ok at the BCG/Bain types of places where groups and teams were smaller and more varied, but at places like Deloitte, it seemed like you could get stuck. E.g. At a recruiting event I met someone at Deloitte who worked on some sort of healthcare implementation project soon after starting...and after that he only ever got pulled into very similar healthcare cases.

    Obviously you can have a specialty, but I don't want to have *that* much of a specialty. I'd much rather be specialized to a type of work rather than a type of project. Like now, I tend to do programming heavy work on the quantitative aspects of cases, but those cases can vary greatly...so I can do what I am good at without doing exactly the same thing over and over.
     
  5. OmniscientCause

    OmniscientCause Senior member

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    Pretty much summed up what i want...dont know if i can get into the big three...based on my ocs kick off yesterday at smith...pwc and deloitte are the main hiring companies for the program.
     
  6. ballmouse

    ballmouse Senior member

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    Yes. This is my experience as well. The subject matter of your projects may change, but even if it's an assessment, implementation, PMO, or regulatory work, the work is all pretty similar. And at the junior levels, there is very little control over what you're working on (at least in my experience). You just get pulled onto projects to bill clients and bring in revenue for the firm. No one really cares about anything else.

    The consultants who appear to enjoy the work the most are the senior managers or partners that can control exactly what they're doing at all times (pretty much that they are able to navigate and avoid everything they don't want to do and only work on what they want). This from what I understand takes years of internal branding at a firm.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2014
  7. Metlin

    Metlin Senior member

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    Depends on the firm, really, and the kind of work you do.

    Sure, there are standard templates and some types of work are all similar (e.g., there are only so many different ways that you can do growth strategy, cost reduction, or PMI). But there are certainly nuances within each industry and within each client, and that's important.
     
  8. althanis

    althanis Senior member

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    Does anyone have any links to healthcare consulting in Toronto? I'm in the middle of masters in health admin, and trying to find a second 3-month admin residence at a consulting firm, to get exposure while hopefully adding some value myself.
     
  9. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    Correct.
     
  10. Metlin

    Metlin Senior member

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    I actively avoid strategy cases when I can -- when I was younger, it was quite different. However, as you get older, two things happen: one, you realize that strategy work is high burn, and that is not sustainable. Two, strategy work is also uncertain from a revenue perspective, while operational work is longer lasting and more cyclical/predictable.
     
  11. OmniscientCause

    OmniscientCause Senior member

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    what is the perception of federal consulting from a commercial consultants perspective? Being in DC i really only have a shot of landing a federal gig if I want to stay in the area.
     
  12. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    Asshole shit cunt motherfuckers.

    Oh wait, that's from a taxpayer perspective. My bad.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  13. ballmouse

    ballmouse Senior member

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    I'm under the impression they do more 'internal audit' type work.
     
  14. MSchapiro

    MSchapiro Senior member

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    That made me laugh.

    From my understanding there are some laterals, but it is not too common. More often commercial consultants occasionally sit in on federal engagements, although not as often as they used to. The federal consulting sector is huge, however, and one could easily spend their entire life there.
     
  15. horndog

    horndog Senior member

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    As a federal consultant you'll get to see first hand how incompetently your tax money gets spent!
     
    2 people like this.
  16. MSchapiro

    MSchapiro Senior member

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    You can be a volunteer firefighter and do the same. Maybe even get a few beers thrown into the mix.
     
  17. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    I feel a little daft asking this, but I'm expecting a phone call from a recruiter at a leading consulting company (my resume was forwarded to a junior recruiter who emailed me to say to expect to be contacted by the senior recruiter). What can I expect in this call? I've been in government for a good while so I'm a little rusty with my private sector (not to mention consulting) recruiting/interview process. I intend to do some research on my own but wanted to see what ideas would come up here.
     
  18. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    Looks like I'm set for an interview next week. How much time should be spent preparing for the case interview? My contact indicated I should look into their interview tips/tutorials on their site and youtube. Will buying a book like "Crack the Case" or "Case in Point" be overkill since I'm not doing multiple rounds with multiple companies? Apparently, I'm just having one round with 2-3 people.
     
  19. flyindarkness

    flyindarkness Senior member

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    most people who are serious about the job usually spends 20 hours plus minimum.
    Some people will "get it" with 20 live cases, some people will need 100 to be fully comfortable.
    What firm if you don't mind me asking? If it's the top three, definitely take some time and practice, there are a lot of good resources on the net, no need to buy a book.
     
  20. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    +1. If it's MBB, the case will make or break it, and the people against which you are competing will have spent quite a bit of time preparing for it.

    If it's not MBB, it will depend on the firm, and on with which division within the firm you are interviewing. The classic strategy divisions of the big four will also heavily rely upon the case, but other divisions less so. Even there though, you'd do well to spend a bit of time prepping for a case study.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2014

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