Management Consulting Discussion

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Artisan Fan, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    never went to the consulting route seriously, was way more into finance at the time. Any way I had interview with the big as well as the small. Generally the first round were pretty decent, second round can be brutal to ok, then they definitely try to kill you in the third round (if there was one, which was the case with all the small one I interviewed back then).
     


  2. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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    never went to the consulting route seriously, was way more into finance at the time. Any way I had interview with the big as well as the small. Generally the first round were pretty decent, second round can be brutal to ok, then they definitely try to kill you in the third round (if there was one, which was the case with all the small one I interviewed back then).

    This is generally true of all good jobs but in consulting there are no stress interviews like I saw in banking. Not sure if they still do that or not. Keeping composure under fire is important.
     


  3. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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    I went to U Missouri and work at McK. It's possible. Don't let your school be a roadblock.

    AF, I'm in the ATL office. Was there as an Exp Hire BA from 07-09 and just returned post grad school. Great thread.


    Great, still know a few folks there.

    Have any advice for state schoolers?

    Yes, do something unusual but useful in terms of results.
     


  4. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    This is generally true of all good jobs but in consulting there are no stress interviews like I saw in banking. Not sure if they still do that or not. Keeping composure under fire is important.

    I interviewed for consulting, trading and quant. job (quite phd program people here [​IMG] ). Didn't have real stress interview as in people are asshole, but definitely some hard hard questions (especially for quants., bunch math and physics phd/professors...).
     


  5. pwy95a

    pwy95a Senior member

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    Have any advice for state schoolers?

    What tends to be attractive is not whether or not you went to the best school (although firms tend to start there) but whether or not you were the best at your school.

    Distinctiveness, wherever you may be, is attractive. Now that assumes you have all the basics checked (e.g., GPA, GMAT or test scores, analytics).
     


  6. Matt

    Matt [email protected]

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    Yes, do something unusual but useful in terms of results.

    I think that's great advice for anyone mapping their college years to a degree actually.

    It worked wonders for me personally, so maybe I am tainted by my own bio, but certainly I found coupling a major and a minor (kinda - Australia works differently) that no one else had done was a great leg-up in interviews and in differentiating myself from the candidate pool.
     


  7. gettoasty

    gettoasty Senior member

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    I always wanted to do consulting as a career. This thread is very informative so 'thank you' Artisan Fan. Anyways, I always imagined consulting as working with a client in mapping out and finding solutions to their problems. I just feel like I work better in an atmosphere where I can make connections one-on-one and go through a rundown in supplying my client with the 'needs' they are so intent on having. Currently I am finishing a dual degree in financial economics (business admin.) BS and quantitative management (statistics) BS. I am not sure if the two majors done together is anything different, but what can I possibly do in terms of a consulting career after finishing up? I have no prior experience other than a summer intern, and I do plan on going to a master's program as I feel I am not PhD material... yet? And instead of an MBA that I was so set on, I am really intent on going into graduate level statistics.

    Just not sure where to fit this all in as a job first sounds more appealing then continuance of school. Thoughts?
     


  8. uNiCoRnPriNcEsSx

    uNiCoRnPriNcEsSx Senior member

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    if you develop specialized knowledge within an industry, you can work for a vc or startup
     


  9. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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    I always wanted to do consulting as a career. This thread is very informative so 'thank you' Artisan Fan. Anyways, I always imagined consulting as working with a client in mapping out and finding solutions to their problems. I just feel like I work better in an atmosphere where I can make connections one-on-one and go through a rundown in supplying my client with the 'needs' they are so intent on having. Currently I am finishing a dual degree in financial economics (business admin.) BS and quantitative management (statistics) BS. I am not sure if the two majors done together is anything different, but what can I possibly do in terms of a consulting career after finishing up? I have no prior experience other than a summer intern, and I do plan on going to a master's program as I feel I am not PhD material... yet? And instead of an MBA that I was so set on, I am really intent on going into graduate level statistics.

    Just not sure where to fit this all in as a job first sounds more appealing then continuance of school. Thoughts?


    You might consider a more quantitative consulting firm and then you can apply the advanced math you have while learning important consulting skills. Maybe firms like Oliver, Wyman would be a great fit or a Big 3 looking for a quant.
     


  10. level32

    level32 Senior member

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    If you learn a bit more application for your quant knowledge, eg operations research and resource modeling, I think you'd have pretty good luck even at non econ consulting firms.
     


  11. ramuman

    ramuman Senior member

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    never went to the consulting route seriously, was way more into finance at the time. Any way I had interview with the big as well as the small. Generally the first round were pretty decent, second round can be brutal to ok, then they definitely try to kill you in the third round (if there was one, which was the case with all the small one I interviewed back then).
    I don't know if kill is the correct term. I think (like an interview with any company) keeping your cool so that you can let your true self come through* is all you need. On the one hand, yeah you are interviewing with smart people, but at the end of the day, they're still humans that you can deal with like those from any walk of life. Also, McK's first round is only based on an aptitude test and Bain and BCG only use two rounds of interviews. That might just have been how things worked for the fall round in the southeast, but I think that's their general procedure. I didn't interview with Bain so that's conjecture from the interwebs on my part. Honestly, just try not to screw up the math, walk your way through the cases with the interviewer, follow any directional hints they give you, and be personable. I read a bit of Case in Point, but I can't say the live interviews matched the examples in that book. The live ones were more dynamic. McK cases were more structured than BCG, but neither were step by step walk throughs. *Cliche alert. Edit: Just saw AF covered this in far fewer words than me. My mom does still say I should've been a lawyer [​IMG].
     


  12. ramuman

    ramuman Senior member

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    I should also mention: Don't let your school or major ever keep you from doing what you want. It's only a roadblock if you make it one.
     


  13. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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    I should also mention: Don't let your school or major ever keep you from doing what you want. It's only a roadblock if you make it one.

    +1.
     


  14. ns7

    ns7 Well-Known Member

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    Also, McK's first round is only based on an aptitude test and Bain and BCG only use two rounds of interviews. That might just have been how things worked for the fall round in the southeast, but I think that's their general procedure. I didn't interview with Bain so that's conjecture from the interwebs on my part.

    This is standard. McK's "test" is for non-MBA applicants. For MBAs all three have 2 interview rounds.
     


  15. newinny

    newinny Senior member

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    I know MBA's that have had to take McKinsey's test.
     


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