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Mad Cow Disease As the Next Epidemic?

JYK830

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This is my first thread here. Exciting.

With the recent outcry in South Korea over its lifting the ban on U.S. beef imports, I was wondering if others were worried about this possible epidemic.

USDA is blocking its meat industry from examining all cows for Mad Cow Disease. This means that American and South Korean consumers are at danger with possibly contaminated beef on the market.

For consumers who go to organic grocery stores, this may not be a huge issue. However, middle-class and lower-class families who cannot access organic meat on a regular basis due to budget are at risk here.

And the news got me thinking, "What about the beef provided at public institutions? School cafeterias?"

It is hard to imagine an epidemic at work. I just cannot think that the government would let a problem of this magnitude just slide. Nevertheless, it is possible that the government values the profit gained from the meat industry more than public health.

Since the symptoms of Mad Cow Disease tend to take more than a decade to show up, I am being cautious for now.

What do you guys think?
 

fcuknu

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I remember when I was watching videos in 6th grade about how Mad Cow Disease could kill hundreds of millions. Been 10 years and "by April 2008, it had killed 163 people in Britain, and 37 elsewhere". Just topping 200... sick.
 

lee_44106

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First of all, if I cannot have beef than life is not worth living.

Secondly, the concern over Mad Cow is just overblown. A risk, a danger, yes. But what's up with all the gloom and doom?

If one looks at the number of cows killed per year versus the number of potential contamination, it is minuscule. Americans, and human beings in general, tend to overreact to dramatic events, completely taking the likelihodd of something like Mad Cow out of proportion.

Tens of thousands of people die as a direct result of alcohol consumption every year (car accidents, alcoholism-associated diseases), and nobody bats an eye.

How many people do YOU know directly that died from Mad Cow?
 

Nico Samuel Pleninsek

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It can take up to fifty years to iccubate; yes I believe it could become a major epidemic; hence, I haven't eaten beef since fifth grade.

And for those who do not believe it is a serious concern, then go do researh on the topic.
 

Texasmade

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I'm not 100% sure on this but Mad Cow only happens in the nervous system and brain of the cow so therefore most beef is actually safe to eat. Only thing not safe is ground beef since that usually contains some nerves of the cow when the beef is ground up.

I think a lot of things are blown out of porportion. Anyone remember the avian bird flu epidemic? I still remember there was some absurd TV movie about it where millions of people died. I think Mad Cow is the same thing.
 

datasupa

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Originally Posted by Nico Samuel Pleninsek
It can take up to fifty years to iccubate; yes I believe it could become a major epidemic; hence, I haven't eaten beef since fifth grade. And for those who do not believe it is a serious concern, then go do researh on the topic.
Spoken like a true ignoramus. I think the odds are more likely that a construction crane will fall on you.
 

lee_44106

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Originally Posted by datasupa
Spoken like a true ignoramus. I think the odds are more likely that a construction crane will fall on you.

ha ha, how true.

And it would the a construction crane that had fallen, struck a building or two, hit the ground, and then bounced a bit.
 

lee_44106

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Originally Posted by Nico Samuel Pleninsek
Time will tell...

Yes, let's let time tell. In the meantime, I'll be gorging on beef and steak and all things from Mr. Cow.
 

Nico Samuel Pleninsek

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Originally Posted by lee_44106
Yes, let's let time tell. In the meantime, I'll be gorging on beef and steak and all things from Mr. Cow.

I'm going to go eat celery sticks and put on my night gown.
 

JYK830

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Cases of Mad Cow Disease were found in Japan during the 90s. Japan recently imposed a ban on U.S. beef after confirming different cases of Mad Cow Disease. Japan only lifted the ban after agreeing to limit the age of the cattle to 20 months.

Most cases of Mad Cow Disease have been found in cows older than 30 months. The few cases that occurred in Japan were caused by cows that were around 23 months old.

Japan was able to negotiate this deal due to its international stature that almost equals the United States in many areas.

However, South Korea gave in. The country agreed to import U.S. beef older than 30 months. Why? Because the current president is a moron.

A shady authoritarian unfit for politics, his decision to lift the ban on U.S. beef has been fueled by monetary greed. He thought that he would be able to land a free trade agreement with the United States by treating the beef import as a favor.

The people in South Korea are furious, calling for his impeachment.

I don't want to get into that though. My point is that the age of the cattle comes into effect when examining this epidemic. It is impossible to know if the cow has the disease despite its age. However, the risk increases if the cow is older. This has been the issue in South Korea, and I just wanted to point that out.

I just can't imagine the actual epidemic happening in the United States because, as many users have pointed out, its odds are low. However, I don't think a more strict test on detecting signs of the disease in the meat industry would hurt. It would cost a lot of money, but it ensures everyone that the meat they're eating is safe.
 

NaTionS

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So why is the USDA not allowing beef to be checked for mad cow? That seems like an obvious solution.
 

oscarthewild

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Why do they call it PMS?

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Because mad cow disease was taken!
 

JYK830

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Hehehe ^.

Because it costs too much money for the USDA to test all cows. And there is a cover-up by politicians who get paid to stay quiet. Furthermore, the federal regulators in charge of the industry were appointed to their high positions by influential government officials. It's a symbiotic relationship that fuels both parties based on money.

In short, the meat industry plagued by deregulation and the government that covers it up need a strict ass-kicking.
 

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