Luxury Dry Cleaners??

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Carbonless, Oct 20, 2010.

  1. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    When it comes to my suits ... I return them to the tailor for cleaning and pressing.
    I tried this but the guy in Hangzhou who makes the suits for Men's Wearhouse takes forever to get them back to me.
     


  2. Will

    Will Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I tried this but the guy in Hangzhou who makes the suits for Men's Wearhouse takes forever to get them back to me.

    It is said that the Gold Rush miners sent their laundry to China by clipper ship. And at Men's Wearhouse prices you can simply acquire enough suits to withstand similar turnaround times.
     


  3. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Apparently Nehru sent his laundry to Paris.
     


  4. earthdragon

    earthdragon Senior member

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    In the Washington, DC area:

    Parkway Dry Cleaning, Chevy Chase, Maryland


    All 'smoke & mirrors' with these guys. Great packaging, pickup and delivery - however they still managed to 'destroy', (by bleaching out the color) on all of the Suede trim on an LP Gilet of mine. Super pricey also.
    Try Georgetown Valet - good prices and no issues yet.
     


  5. scurvyfreedman

    scurvyfreedman Senior member

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    In the Washington, DC area:

    Parkway Dry Cleaning, Chevy Chase, Maryland


    +1

    Very pricey. In the range StuBloom mentioned, but well worth it. The only place I will take a canvassed suit for service. They actually hand roll the lapels instead of machine pressing them. They return items with so much tissue paper in the various places body parts filled, it looks like someone's in the suit when it comes back.

    The other thing I've found is that they examine the suit completely when you drop it off looking minor stains and minor damage and tighten buttons etc as part of the service. They also do much of their cleaning by hand and use the less harsh cleaners that StuBloom mentions on his blog. Parkway has won numerous awards and certifications. They do pickup and delivery. I'd surely say they are a luxury dry cleaner.
     


  6. stylomilo

    stylomilo Well-Known Member

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    I use Jeeves in Hong Kong , an outpost of the one in London.
     


  7. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Why should a good cleaner do it any other way? Some men wear $200 suits. Others wear $6,000 suits. Pricing based on their claims history lets them charge significantly less to clean the $200 suit.
    I can see your point but the way Margaret's does it, it would cost you $600 to dry clean your $6000 suit. Maybe they figure they will wreck about 10% of everything they touch. But if they really want to go that way, they should give you a discount depending on how old the suit is . . . Actually, the smart way for a dry cleaner to do this would be to make you declare the value of the suit. You could declare whatever value you wanted but then that value would get plugged into their charging formula. You could declare a very low value and save a lot of money but if something went wrong, you'd only be able to recover what you declared. Anyway, whatever its merit, the way they implement it is just terrible. "Nice suit, tier three! Oh and 10% cashmere, +$10! Three roll two, +$5! Now let's see, how many buttons? . . . "
     


  8. RSN125

    RSN125 Senior member

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    Apparently Nehru sent his laundry to Paris.

    William Halstead (NYC/Baltimore) sent his shirts back to Charvet in Paris to be laundered.
     


  9. comrade

    comrade Senior member

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    Apparently Nehru sent his laundry to Paris.
    Actually it was Jawaharal Nehru's father (Pandit) Motilal as immortalized in S.J. Perelman's hysterical " No Starch in the Dhoti. S'il Vous Plait" http://www.newyorker.com/archive/195...ARDS_000244785 The pioneering American Surgeon and morphine addict, Dr William Halstead had his Charvet shirts sent to Charvet in Paris for laundering: "And Halsted was fastidious about - so fastidious about his dress that he had his shirts made at Charvet in Paris in large, large quantities, and then he sent his shirts back to Paris to be laundered because he felt no one in America could wash and iron his shirt." http://www.npr.org/templates/transcr...ryId=123570287
     


  10. stubloom

    stubloom Senior member

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    Thanks for the interesting links.
     


  11. magogian12345

    magogian12345 Senior member

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    I've used Davis Imperial in Chicago a few times, and I'm not impressed. For shirts, they offer two levels of service: normal ($4-5) and all hand press/iron (~$12). Their normal service is no better than any cheapo drycleaner and at more than twice the cost.
     


  12. stubloom

    stubloom Senior member

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    magogian12345 alludes to an interesting trend amongst high-end dry cleaners: offering 2 levels of service (generically dubbed their 'basic" and their "premium" service) within the same facility. I'd be interested to find out if any other forum members have come across this trend? This is the way I see it: would Morton's still be Morton's if they opened a Morton's Steakhouse inside every Denny's Restaurant and utilized the same kitchen, chefs, service, food vendors, etc. I think not. I cover this topic in these 2 blog posts.... The myth of two levels of dry cleaning and shirt laundry service: http://ravefabricare.com/true-qualit...y-service.aspx Breaking news: Denny's and Morton's announce company merger: http://ravefabricare.com/true-quali...y's-and-morton's-announce-company-merger.aspx Website: www.ravefabricare.com Daily blog: www.truequalitycleaning.com
     


  13. Xiaogou

    Xiaogou Senior member

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    ^ so how long have you worked at Rave?
     


  14. comrade

    comrade Senior member

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    I've used Davis Imperial in Chicago a few times, and I'm not impressed. For shirts, they offer two levels of service: normal ($4-5) and all hand press/iron (~$12). Their normal service is no better than any cheapo drycleaner and at more than twice the cost.

    That's disappointing. I moved from from Chicago 2O years ago. Never used them for shirts.
    We used them for special dry cleaning occasionally with good results.
     


  15. magogian12345

    magogian12345 Senior member

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    I'm going to try Davis Imperial's higher level service for my tuxedo shirt (this shirt is a devil to iron). I'll pass along the results.
     


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