Lining a Harris Tweed in Moleskin?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Grammaton Cleric, Mar 29, 2014.

  1. Grammaton Cleric

    Grammaton Cleric Senior member

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    I have 2m of a 15oz. Harris Tweed that I would like to have made into a casual jacket. I'd like the coat to be suitable for the roughest of NYC winters, and am considering having it lined in 16oz. moleskin.

    Anyone ever done this before? Thoughts?
     
  2. Andrew Ryan

    Andrew Ryan Senior member

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  3. GBR

    GBR Senior member

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    I fear that you maybe just short if the tweed you need. With moleskin it will be very heavy and cumbersome to wear, is it really necessary or have you considered silk which wears 'hot'.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014
  4. Grammaton Cleric

    Grammaton Cleric Senior member

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    Hmm, you feel just a single-lining of 16oz. moleskin would be a bit much? I figured the total ~30oz. weight would be comparable to a heavy melton peacoat I have.

    I have used silk in the past, but frankly, it didn't do much in terms of added warmth. Maybe a lighter-weight (10-11oz.) flannel?

    Typically, I would just ask my tailor, but my new tailors in HK doesn't have much experience with this sort of thing and have asked me to guide them.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014
  5. Macallan

    Macallan Senior member

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    Go for a heavier tweed cloth instead
     
  6. GBR

    GBR Senior member

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    I do, quite apart from being heavy and cumbersome.

    Little surprise about an HK tailor, they would certainly not be accustomed to this. I would seriously try a good heavy silk which would have a more pleasant feel and be very warm.
     
  7. YRR92

    YRR92 Senior member

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    This is a dumb question, but isn't some Harris tweed woven in half-widths? A 15 oz. fabric on a half-width loom would be 30 oz. full width, right?

    I may be barking up the wrong tree, but I know my 14 oz jeans feel a lot lighter than most Harris tweed I've handled. Of course, this may be because the Harris is more loosely woven, and so the actual weight is not that different.

    When you say "casual jacket," what are you describing? If you're looking for pure outerwear, moleskin (not at all breathable) would certainly keep you warm, but a lighter brushed cotton might work a bit better.
     
  8. blackbowtie

    blackbowtie Senior member

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    All this talk of the lining of tweed jackets reminded me of a question I've always had. What is the rationale of an unlined tweed jacket? I assume that one would only wear tweed when it's cold. So what is the point of an unlined tweed jacket, which presumably would undercut its ability to keep the wearer warm?
     
  9. emptym

    emptym Moderator Moderator

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    ^It makes the jacket function more like a sweater. I've had four tweed jackets made, and they're all fully lined. But I used to own an unlined BB tweed jacket. The lack of lining probably made it slightly more casual, drapey, smaller to pack, and breathable. But I do prefer lining for easy on/off.

    My only concern w/ the moleskin linking is that it would make putting it on and taking it off a bit difficult, particularly when wearing a sweater. I'd go w/ the heavy silk GBR suggested or maybe a smooth finished wool, maybe even worsted flannel. Iirc, it was fairly common for overcoats to be lined w/ smooth woolens.

    What did you end up deciding, GC?
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2014
  10. comrade

    comrade Senior member

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    Might not really be an issue in the UK where tweeds are often worn with wool/cotton blend shirts,
    heavy sweaters, vests etc. and under a rain and wind proof jacket or coat.

    For example:

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_BUOfb81B9...ppmdZ0AaI/s1600/wellis+shooting0002smlis5.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2014
  11. SimonC

    SimonC Senior member

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    No - most fabric measurements (certainly all quoted here) are for a square piece - a yard square in the case of oz measurements. The other option is by the running yard / metre which would indeed differ by the width of the fabric.

    So a 15oz half-width fabric, in common usage, will be the same weight as a 15oz full-width fabric when made into a garment.

    Oh, and to the OP - tweed of that weight isn't actually that thick and would probably be overwhelmed by an equivalent-weight moleskin since the moleskin is cotton and less dense (so the moleskin will probably end up being thicker than the tweed).

    Either use the tweed as originally intended with a heavyweight lining (silk, or a heavy bemberg if you can find a source) which is largely appropriate to its weight, or get a heavier tweed to begin with.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2014
  12. Danl

    Danl Active Member

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    HI-

    i have a pretty varied assortment of new and used HT, with some really interesting pieces. One short coat made in Europe has a contrast quilted poly/nylon lining which for the winter is really great. If you go with Moleskin, I would only do it in the body, because the sleeves would bind.
     
  13. Danl

    Danl Active Member

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    If you have been to Southern California in the winter, the climate is perfect for an unlined Harris Tweed. It takes the chill off without the bulk. Somehow, a lined jacket or sport coat here seems like overkill except on the really coldest days. When the tweed is unlined, it also breathes better, and in my experience, the Harris does not seem heavy at all.
     

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