• I'm happy to introduce the Styleforum Happy Hour, our brand new podcast featuring lively discussion about menswear and the fashion industry. In the inaugural edition, a discussion of what's going on in retail today. Please check it out on the Journal. All episodes will be also be available soon on your favorite podcast platform.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Lexol questions

guyver00

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2010
Messages
643
Reaction score
127
I recently came across an old pair of leather shoes, so I thought I would practice polishing. The shoes were light brown, almost rusty red in colour. I used Lexol conditioner, after I started polishing I noticed that the shoes got darker, like a mid brown colour, as if the shoes were wet. I left it dry overnight, and it still looks like that. Is that normal?

Also I noticed a few dark streaks when I accidently splashed the conditioner. Will that go away? Some posters said that Lexol conditioner darkens shoes, is that normal?
 

chasingred

Distinguished Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2009
Messages
1,190
Reaction score
5
I use AE conditioner and cleaner and this happens to all of my tan or light brown colored shoes. They eventually darken and take on a kind of chili color. Personally, I like the color, but I wish I could keep a pair of tan shoes tan.
 

kungapa

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2010
Messages
838
Reaction score
26
Darkening is hard to avoid. Using a polish lighter than the actual shoe color helps somewhat, but they will still darken.
 

greekgeek

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
2,820
Reaction score
20
After having two pair of shoes ruined by lexol I no longer use it. I have had great success with mink oil and am about to try Saphir Renovateur. A word about the mink oil, hit the oiled shoes with a hair dryer to soak it in more quickly and wait until the residue is gone before attempting polishing.
 

tjc4golf

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2008
Messages
369
Reaction score
0
Lexol doesn't add color so much as it adds moisture. A pair of shoes on which the leather is properly hydrated/conditioned won't get much darker from Lexol. In contrast it sounds like your "old shoes" hadn't been cared for properly in awhile. Untreated leather will dry out over time. I bet they were originally darker than you found them, dried out and got lighter and then got darker again when you applied lexol.

Subsequent applications of Lexol will not have as much of an effect. Once you reach a cetain threshold the Lexol wil stop making the shoes darker.

Don't worry too much about the dark streaks. They will gradually disapper over time with continued conditioning and polishing. In the interim you can apply lexol to the surrounding areas to even out the color. Don't worry about getting more on the dark areas as those areas are probably already saturated and won't absorb more (or will absorb less than the other areas).
 

Raoul Duke

Senior Member
Joined
May 8, 2008
Messages
975
Reaction score
2
Darkening is not what worries me -- I find that Lexol clouds a good polish job and you basically have to start from scratch.
 

guyver00

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2010
Messages
643
Reaction score
127
Thanks for the reply, just re-read my post and noticed there were some confusions.

I got the shoes because they have a nice rusty red colour, so I thought I would get it just to have a different colour shoes. I knew Lexol conditioner has a reputation to darken shoes, but when I applied it the shoes turned to mid brown. At first it looked like the shoes were wet, similar to soaking your light blue jeans and it turns to a dark blue. I figured that because the leather were wet, that's why it's brown now. I rubbed the conditioner around for 10 min with and old t-shirt, and it wasn't as dark as when I initially applied it. Left it overnight and checked again this morning, and it's still mid brown, like it's still soaking wet but doesn't feel like it.

I think like tjc4golf said, the shoes were probably very dry, and the conditioner just wet it really well and turn the shoes back to it's original colour, which is a mid brown. I haven't polish it with any cream/wax yet, but I think I'll apply another coat of conditioner tonight, and maybe start polishing them tomorrow with a maroon or burgandy polish.

I just noticed that there is a JL sign on the sole, hope it's John Lobb :)
 

chasingred

Distinguished Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2009
Messages
1,190
Reaction score
5
Originally Posted by guyver00
I just noticed that there is a JL sign on the sole, hope it's John Lobb :)



On the issue of having dried out shoes - again, I've used AE on new shoes that were clearly marketed as tan and the effect has been the same. In fact, I'm wearing a pair of Charles Trywhitt military boots right now. Even these over time have become a kind of chili color.

The only way I've been somewhat successful at combating this is using a tan polish and wax. The effect has been very minimal, however.

As for mink oil, I've read that it leaves quite a sticky residue, which in turn makes it easier for your shoes to collect dust.

Hopefully one of the cordwainers on this board can comment on how to keep tan shoes tan.
 

NORE

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2010
Messages
5,497
Reaction score
304
Originally Posted by Raoul Duke
Darkening is not what worries me -- I find that Lexol clouds a good polish job and you basically have to start from scratch.

Yup. But it's conditioner/moisturizer so you'd have to add a layer of wax atop to get a nice shine. Creates depth.
 

WorkingOnIt

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2010
Messages
156
Reaction score
2
I would defer to those who have more experience or knowledge, but I do believe Lexol can darken beyond the original color. I use it all the time on my motorcycle gear and some definitely have discolored from the original color.


My friend tried it on a corner of her white leather jacket and there was some discoloration. Instead, she uses the leather cleaning kit sold by Dainese (I don't know who makes it) that hasn't shown any adverse effects in coloration.

FWIW
 

JamesX

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2010
Messages
1,031
Reaction score
16
I thought Mink Oil makes your shoes a lot harder to shine? I never used it because of that.
 

Made in California

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
880
Reaction score
15
Since Lexol usually darkens, what should I use to condition refined-grain, off-white leather dress shoes? I have seen a lot of suggestions in other threads, but am wondering is there a conditioner and polish that you prefer specifically for white/off-white?
 

NORE

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2010
Messages
5,497
Reaction score
304
Link to non-darkening Lexol above. (no experience)
 

guyver00

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2010
Messages
643
Reaction score
127
From some of the forum member's posts, it looks like Saphir Renovateur, Chelsea leather food, and Venetian shoe cream are highly recommended.

Originally Posted by Made in California
Since Lexol usually darkens, what should I use to condition refined-grain, off-white leather dress shoes? I have seen a lot of suggestions in other threads, but am wondering is there a conditioner and polish that you prefer specifically for white/off-white?
 

Featured Sponsor

How many pairs of shoes do you own?

  • 1 - 4

    Votes: 2 2.3%
  • 5 - 10

    Votes: 11 12.8%
  • 11 - 20

    Votes: 27 31.4%
  • 21 - 30

    Votes: 21 24.4%
  • 31 - 40

    Votes: 8 9.3%
  • 41 - 50

    Votes: 4 4.7%
  • 51 - 60

    Votes: 2 2.3%
  • 61 - 70

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 71 - 80

    Votes: 5 5.8%
  • 81 - 90

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 91 - 100

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 100+

    Votes: 6 7.0%

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
427,301
Messages
9,196,422
Members
193,137
Latest member
ziroolin

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Top