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Lets talk about COFFEE

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Flambeur, Dec 2, 2009.

  1. 1969

    1969 Senior member

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    It's been a long time since I've been there but If the Torrafazione guys still have a place there that would be my rec.
     
  2. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Anyone an idea as to what causes these bubbles (poured ~2 minutes ago)?

    [​IMG]

    Apparently also common and much more extreme with Square Mile's beans (not my picture).

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2013
  3. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    In the foam? I have no idea, but I think that's supposed to be a sign of good latte technique. The bubbles in the 2nd picture look way too big, though. They're usually pretty fine.
     
  4. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    1 person likes this.
  5. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Pop up coffee bar in Hamburg:

    [​IMG]

    Oh, and I think the bubbles have something to do with the coffee. I mean the huge amount of bubbles in the top halfmoon/dark brown part of the cup, not the few in the "white/light brown part" (these are cause I didn't tap thoroughly enough).
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2013
  6. WiredandTired

    WiredandTired Senior member

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    Extraction might be too hot, I've seen intensely dark crema a result of that.
     
  7. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    That's not it. It was light crema and not much of it anyway.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2013
  8. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    Might be just the beans and how far it is from roast date
     
  9. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    8-9 days.
    The coffe of the other guy was 10 days old. He's also had another Square Mile roast where the bubbles occured too. He says it's the norm with Square Mile's roasts. Looks odd, I know, but it's not a fault in the steaming process. It's definitely the coffee. How light does Square Mile roast? I think it may have something to do with light roasts. But then again, I doubt coffees in London that use Square Mile coffee serve their guests cappuccini that look like this. Weird.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2013
  10. SchwererGustav

    SchwererGustav Senior member

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    I've recently been introduced to the pleasures of drinking black coffee, though I largely stick to green tea. As such, I don't keep a coffee maker at home and am considering whether I should get one to explore the various roasts (Is that even the proper term?) on my own.

    An additional wrinkle is that when I have ladyfriends over-night, some are surprised that I don't have a machine - which never bothered me since I would stop by a Starbucks during my morning jog.

    If I decide to purchase a machine, which would best handle non-daily use? Additionally, what are roasts worth exploring (for myself), and which appeal to the largest spectrum of women?
     
  11. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    get an aeropress and a hand grinder like the hario skerton. buy the pre-modded version from orphan espresso.

    as for beans not sure what's available in your area.
     
  12. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    A kinda survey article on crema:

    http://theshot.coffeeratings.com/2013/07/the-controversy-over-crema/

    I didn't know pressurized portafilters were used to create fake crema.

    On the CO2 side, for drip brew, I've noticed that dark-roasted coffee (like Peet's) will outgas CO2 like mad, even when it's a couple of weeks old. Lighter roast stuff will bubble a bit when it's really young (like the 1st week), but then be pretty flat after that.

    Speaking of Peet's, the Ethiopian Queen City is something else: strong blueberries combined with a wine-like complexity. It's a limited edition, so get it while you can!
     
  13. WiredandTired

    WiredandTired Senior member

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    A particular technique now is to use a demitasse spoon and mix or fold the coffee into the crema, helping to distribute and even out the taste. Some say this technique also helps to provide better consistent latte art in milk drinks as well as a more even taste in a cup.

    Experiment and see.
     
  14. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Yeah, the best thing is something to boil water in, and either a French Press, Aeropress, Clever Pourover or something of the sort. Regular drip machines are garbage unless you spend big bucks.


    Yeah cheaper machines use pressurized portafilters. I had one a while back. It was awful. It just shakes up the coffee inside of it creating bubbles that somewhat mimic crema.
     
  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I've been trying the Starbucks Reserve coffees lately made in the clover. They are good. Very dark roasts, but you can still make out the nuances in he individual coffees.
     
  16. WiredandTired

    WiredandTired Senior member

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    The clover machine is a cut above. The pricing is high though. I had completely forgot about those offerings.

    By the way, what are some good roasters for Kona coffee? To my palette it's such a nice, balanced, and smooth cup. Though admittedly I am drinking it blended as 100% kona is hard to come by and pricy.
     
  17. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The only Kona coffee I had was at Starbucks. It was great. I would highly recommend trying their reserves. The price is high, but it is clover and being that many variables are held constant make it a fun and enjoyable experience to try the different coffees with the same brew method.

    A coworker called me up on the phone and told me he had this awesome Kona coffee (when I worked with him a few years ago he remembered I was a coffee guy). I went down to his desk and he was scooping pre-ground coffee grinds from a can into a Mr. Kitchen. I changed my mind about trying it.
     
  18. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    I'm not sure if you read my perhaps TL;DR post on Hawaiian coffee a couple of months ago: http://www.styleforum.net/t/153072/lets-talk-about-coffee/1200#post_6352529

    Coffee Review this month also has a recent survey of Hawaiian coffees: http://blog.coffeereview.com/green-coffee-origins-and-issues/best-hawaiian-coffee/

    I think the term "Kona" is too broad as there is crappy Kona coffee, and transcendent Kona coffee. As with any coffee, it's down the the farmer and roaster how well the coffee turns out. Hawaii is unique because not only is it the only state in the US that grows coffee on a large commercial scale, but it makes it possible for the farmer, roaster, and barista to work in a very tight loop in a US territory. I'm sure there are some excellent collaborations in large coffee growing countries, but we can only do this in the US in one state.

    One such collaboration is the Rusty's Hawaiian coffee I mentioned in my earlier post, who worked with coffee consultant Miguel Meza from Isla Coffee. He works with farms and roasters to produce really great coffee. He's one of main people (along with the founders of Rusty's) responsible for bringing up the Ka'u region, also on the Big Island, to world-class standards. Personally, I think the best Ka'u coffees are much more interesting than any Kona I've had.

    He's also helped with the farming and roasting of coffee beans specifically for barista championship competitors, and the 2011 US champion did the whole farm to cup thing with Miguel. I think he may have placed 2nd at the world's. In the Coffee Review survey, he was behind 15 of the 27 coffees, including all that score 94 or higher.

    Anyway, this is a long way of saying that there is really excellent Hawaiian coffee, and that people should look past the "Kona" label. The coffees unfortunately are not cheap because of the labor necessary to make them the way they are. I'd characterize the two coffees I had (a Maui mokka peaberry and the championship Caturra) as having balanced acidity and with predominantly milk chocolate notes. The mokka, which is a truly unique offering, also had floral notes. Balanced is really how I'd describe the coffees I've had from there. Many 3rd wave coffees are like funhouse mirrors with freakily exaggerated flavors, or are just plain boring.
     
  19. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    ^The Starbucks reserve Ka'u is pretty darn good.
     
  20. romafan

    romafan Senior member

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    Taking the cold-brew plunge! Quick question(s): because of logistics I'm going to end up steeping closer to 20 hours rather than the recommended 12 - will this have any impact other than slightly stronger concentrate? Also, should I steep at room temp or in the fridge (it's in the fridge now) ? :confused:
     

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