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Lets talk about COFFEE

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Flambeur, Dec 2, 2009.

  1. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Unfortunately it isn't that easy. There are a million factors to consider. Some more info would be helpful.
     
  2. Pierce R

    Pierce R Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. They do roast the beans darker than I like, which is why I use the salt. I'd never seen oil coming out of beans before; I figured it was related to getting them really fresh.

    Still good coffee, though.

    Thanks for the info.
     
  3. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    Pierce, happy to help!


    I use a pretty fine grind for my CCD, but it depends on the beans, your brewing parameters, and your tastes. One of the things I like about using paper filters is that you can use a very fine grind without getting the coffee too gritty. For some beans, a finer grind brings out more of the character of the bean.

    I use a pretty conventional CCD brew: 204F, 22g beans, 360g water, pre-rinsed Filtropa (or another oxygen-cleaned paper filter, don't use the unbleached ones). Stir at 30-seconds to 1 minute, drain at 3 minutes while gently stirring. On my Hario, I start with 12 stops out from the tightest, and adjust from there. On the Capresso Infinity at home, I'm between FP grind and espresso, tending towards the espresso side --- if espresso is 100%, I'm at 70-80%, and FP grind is at 25%.

    For dark roasted beans, I don't grind as fine. For lighter beans, it depends. If it's a really interesting bean with lots of character (usually an Ethiopian heirloom varietal), then I can really push the grind to very fine extremes. A lot of beans grown in the Americas are not very interesting at fine grinds, and taste much worse because the finer grind amplifies everything.

    You can tell if you're getting too fine if you start getting overextraction. For me (and this seems to vary by person), this is when the aftertaste gets a metallic bitterness. When you grind very coarsely, you tend to get more of the "coffee" flavor, and less of the interesting acidic or fruit flavors. If you have crappy beans, grind coarser. This is a simplification, and different beans will do different things.

    As beans age, you may want to do a finer grind because their flavors tend to mute 2 weeks post-roast.

    The best way to figure this out is to get a consistent brewing process, and then only alter your grind setting. 1 or 2 clicks is plenty, especially as you start getting into the really fine range.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2013
  4. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    You may as well just ask me why I don't buy spring water for my tea and coffee. Because I am cheap and lazy.
     
  5. capnwes

    capnwes Senior member

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    Our water is city water (misnamed in my opinion since we live in a town of only 1200), and it tastes/smells horrible. It definitely effects the taste of our coffee to the point where I won't drink it unless the water has been filtered. A Brita pitcher is an easy and inexpensive option. Makes all the difference in the world. Why spend big bucks on the best beans, and ruin them with chlorine and other chems?
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    My parent's water in New Jersey is disgusting. It tastes like salty chlorinated pool water.
     
  7. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    +1. Also rinse your paper filters.
     
  8. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    I wouldn't trust those small "table" waterfilters. They however do one thing very well: make the water softer.
    In general, never use the filters longer than what's suggested and always store it in the fridge because it's great for mold and after the suggested "lifecycle" of the filter, it releases the filtered substances back into the water.
     
  9. delirium

    delirium Senior member

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    Any suggestions of spots to check out in Boston?
     
  10. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    JFC. I was finally able to replace the boiler of my Silvia. :slayer:

    [​IMG]

    First cappuccino in three months...

    [​IMG]

    ... time to practice latte art again! :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  11. AmericanGent

    AmericanGent Senior member

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    Florida, unfortunately
    I can get a good enough micro-foam on my Pavoni to make any cool stuff- just bubbly milk for me.
     
  12. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    SNL has a funny take on Starbucks's new single-serve system:

    http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/starbucks-verismo/1428979/


    Try Thinking Cup in the theater district or Pavement. They are definitely very 3rd wave, so if you don't enjoy sour, fruit bomb espressos, they may not be your cup of tea coffee.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2013
  13. JohnGalt

    JohnGalt Senior member

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  14. ryogrif

    ryogrif Well-Known Member Affiliate Vendor

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    Anybody a fan of pour over coffee? I've got a Chemex and Hario V-60 I use at home daily and I will never go back to machine drip coffee. Along with some delicious freshly roasted beans from Phil & Sebastian out of Calgary, or from Bows & Arrows out of Victoria (local for me!).
     
  15. scottcw

    scottcw Senior member

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    I make a 600ml batch using Chemex every morning on the weekends.
     
  16. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Received another bag of beans from Oslo

    [​IMG]

    Have no idea how Tim Wendelboe roasts beans or what he does but this is notably different than other espresso beans and all in a good way.

    This is lighter than the previous bag I tried and soooo smooth. Zero bitterness, lighter mouthfeel and I taste the coffee with no inconsistency or attributes from the process of pulling the shot. Meaning it is very forgiving and consistent regardless of what is going on with the extraction. Wish this was more accessible, would use his beans all the time.
     
  17. suyuper

    suyuper Member

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    I used to like it. I hate it. Thats all.
     
  18. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Alright, Mr. Pavoni-expert. I can tell you this -- I have, once again, tried to store them outside the fridge. Airtight container. Cold, dark spot. One day went by and I had to adjust my Vario Home v2. Not just a fine setting or two, but three or four (which normally changes it from 25/25 to 25/0 or 25/100 in the coarser direction). Needless to say, endless calibration was in order, multiple times a day. I don't like dumping 100g of coffee per day just to get three good doppio ristretti. YMMV
    The last batch of beans, I once again put in the fridge in an airtight container. Hardly any changes after a day or two in grinding settings. So... I appreciate your sentiments and you definitely state a reasonable point, but don't be offended if I use the technique that works best for me.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
  19. ryogrif

    ryogrif Well-Known Member Affiliate Vendor

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    The beans are going to oxidize regardless, all you can really do is slow the process down as much as possible, but there are honestly so many variables within beans that they break down by themselves, in the freezer, fridge or otherwise. I think any beans kept (fridge, freezer, or otherwise) around longer than a month after the roast date aren't worth the hassle of having to recalibrate to hell and back to brew, at best, a mediocre cup.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2013

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