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Lets talk about COFFEE

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Flambeur, Dec 2, 2009.

  1. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    Just read this and realized I've been using my filter all wrong. :facepalm:
     


  2. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    There are many places, and they're all pretty different, so what you may like depends on your tastes. A good place to start is http://www.coffeereview.com.

    Sweet Maria's is great if you want to get green beans to roast yourself, but if you're looking for roasted coffee beans, you should probably look somewhere else (though occasionally, they will sell roasted beans).
     


  3. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    No takers for iced coffee? Oliver Strand sums up the seeming cold-brew/ice-brew divide in iced-coffee methods:

    http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/06/ristretto-i-dont-know-what-you-did-last-summer/

    One of the interesting blog posts he cites talks about the Cambridge method:

    http://blog.barismo.com/2012/05/iced-coffee-is-trending-hot.html

    Has anyone here tried out the so-called Cambridge method of ice brewing? dwelltime is a shop that does this method.
     


  4. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Cambridge method sounds interesting. I actually like Blue Bottle iced coffee. As I have stated before I don't care for their brewed coffee.
     


  5. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    After a little bit of searching, here is the recipe for Cambridge brew:

    http://blog.barismo.com/2009/06/full-immersion-cold-brewers.html

    edit: more detailed instructions. They also demur on the Japanese iced method ("double-strength over ice").

    http://blog.barismo.com/2011/08/iced-coffee.html
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012


  6. CDHagg

    CDHagg Senior member

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    Supposedly, coffee tastes best at around the 7-10 mark (after roasting). I disagree, at least with regards to espresso. I've found that the older the beans, the more watery and 1-dimensional the shot. Thoughts? Opinions-spinions?
     


  7. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    A guy from a local roaster said that espresso roasts need 1-3 days to "settle". Is this true?
     


  8. pfurey

    pfurey Senior member

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    Cold brewing Stumptown's Ethiopian as we speak. Will be ready in the AM. Can't wait.
     


  9. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    So, I made a couple brewings with the Chemox so far. It looks great and tastes good -- for drip coffee, which I'm just starting to appreciate (until now I was disgusted by it, I only liked espressi or mixed with milk). I've had one weird experience though. Day one, I've had two cups in the morning, two espressi at noon. In the afternoon, I brewed a single origin freshly roasted (1-2 days old) Columbian coffee and had 2-3 cups. After that, I had an unpleasant, sour feeling in my stomach which lasted all evening long. I didn't crave coffee the next day because I still had a bad feeling in my stomach. Could this be due to chlorogenic acid? I've never had it so far. Does this mean the roastery roasts fast at high temperatures -- I think I've read that long and low temperature roasts reduce the level of chlorogenic acid?
     


  10. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    Beans are supposed to rest 48 hours after roast before you drink them. Espresso roasts perhaps a bit longer. I've found really fresh espresso roasts (like 48 hours out) to be kind of faceless, and I personally prefer 1 week for drip brew, but YMMV.

    I don't think CGA is reduced by lower roasting temperatures, because it's already present in the green bean. Maybe you just had too much coffee? Lightly roasted beans drip-brewed tend to have more caffeine than espresso, too.

    edit: don't discount the possibility of bad quality beans or bad quality roasting, too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012


  11. blahman

    blahman Senior member

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    Is good ice coffee possible? All the iced coffee I've ever had either taste completely bland or taste like one of those children's chocolate milkshakes loaded with sugar
     


  12. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Oh, I didn't know that they had to rest that long. That's actually great. One store around here regularly gets Caffé New York that is 7 days old (and in my fantasy that's still my favorite coffee, I loved it in Italy).

    The roastery (drum roaster) is one of the better ones in Hamburg, definitely the most "in" one. Their cafés are also very famous around here (Kaffee Elbold). They use Slayer's (Slayer 2.0). I'm not sure to what extent the personnel that is the roasting beans is qualified though (he seemed knowledgeable though). At least the espresso tastes decent, even if it often doesn't come out of the Slayer because it's regularly broken.
    1 liter coffee in a day doesn't seem like "too much" coffee, but that's the most likely reasoning, I think. I'm probably just not used to it.
    As far as I understand it, "massmarket"-coffee is roasted at very high temperatures for a short time. "Microroasteries" use a lower heat and therefore a longer time. The latter seems to denature more CGA than the further, simply because longer time is more important than higher temperatures. Again, this is just what I've read.

    Is it possible that you think ice coffee = coffee with vanilla ice? :p
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012


  13. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    This is heresy, but I actually like beans up to a month after their roast date. They do fade a bit, but for my tastes, they kind of peak 2 weeks or so out. When the roast is young, a lot of them can be either unbalanced or for espresso, a bit anonymous.

    Barista skill, especially their tastes and ability to diagnose a shot, count for a lot more than the equipment. The Slayer lets you do fancy pressure profiling, but if they can't pull a decent shot on a regular machine (like a La Marzocco GB/5), then a fancier machine is just more rope with which to hang themselves.

    I hadn't heard about the high temps vs. short roasting periods. Roasts do come about very quickly: at the very end, literally seconds are significant. It could be that mass market roasters use Robusta beans as well, which aren't great for coffee, but they need it to produce the volume of coffee that they do.

    I wonder if it's easier for you to get beans from Square Mile (in the UK) or a Norwegian roaster (Wendleboe) than it is for us in the US. They are two examples of really excellent 3rd wave roasters in Europe.
     


  14. Hiamber

    Hiamber Member

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    i like coffee with some sugar, it tastes great, but tea seems more healthy, and won't make you fat.
     


  15. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Square Mile = 10€ shipping for 1kg (12 month subscription of 350g Filter roast each month results in roughly 30€/kilo, which is an ok price if the coffee is really good; 500g espresso roasts/month for 35€/kg; one can probably ask for both and a reduction of shipping costs). Wendleboe doesn't specify in the Terms. 60€/kilo, :not bad:. Oh, they say "Please keep in mind resting times for coffee. 2-4 days for normal roasted coffee and 8-11 days for espresso roasted coffee.", too.
    I think whenever I get my espresso machine and a decent grinder, I'll give Square Mile a try as you seem to have a good opinion about them.

    The Hario "Woodneck" isn't by any means an ugly version of a Chemox, is it?

    I don't get it. Are these people spambots? But for what reason if there's no actual advertisement?
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2012


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