Leather Quality and Properties

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by VegTan, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Senior member

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    Last time I was in art school a typical #2 pencil was considered HB, the middle of the hard/soft graphite gamut. The most versatile of graphite grades.

    But I digress... :)
     


  2. wurger

    wurger Senior member

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    Exactly, most stores have a good return policy that covers new shoes that don't have creases.

    Imagine if a salesperson bend your shoes for you and then after trying on at home, the customer wants to return them and said the sales bent them. It's just too much complications, and even yourself didn't want to do it straight away when I first suggested, had to wait for more justifications and proof.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2013


  3. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    You digressed because I digressed after Patrick digressed, making him the clever one for setting the trap.
    I had a different baptismal. ...engineering, in a time when drawings were done by hand. From there I learned the industrial applications of paper, linen, mylar, ink pens and pencils. There was probably little cross-over to the art world proper so thank you for clarifying.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2013


  4. VegTan

    VegTan Senior member

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    A glazing jack and a glass cylinder. A glass jar of shoe cream would be a substitute.

    [​IMG]
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    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013


  5. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Senior member

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    Traditional is still the best in my opinion (not unlike shoe making). Now a days, talent is scarcely needed in too many technical/artistic fields. But yet again, i digress...
     


  6. VegTan

    VegTan Senior member

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    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013


  7. RDiaz

    RDiaz Senior member

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    I'm in Spain; there's no way Vass would be just $100 more, and AE is more expensive than Carmina here. However, while the construction of Carmina shoes has never looked great to me, I thought they used decent materials. Still disappointed, because basically they are the only "high-end" shoe I can afford and actually try on before buying [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2013


  8. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    A Fine Pair of Shoes has a Abbeyhorn bone folder on sale at 99p. They describe it as follows:


    'Made from a natural material these bone folders area must for any craftsperson or leather worker, smooths leather/ folds paper...' If someone wanted a (very cheap) substitute for deer bone, would this be it?

    [​IMG]
     


  9. Equus Leather

    Equus Leather Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    A good quality bone folder thats actually made of bone is a very useful leather work tool, its part of how we finish edges. I also use one for my long riding boots that are made in the traditional flesh side out manner to burnish out scratches Charlie
     


  10. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    A lifetime ago, when I worked in a print shop, we used one of these to produce a sharp edge to folded paper or card. As with the deer bone issue, I am still not sure why we needed to use a bone for this.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013


  11. Equus Leather

    Equus Leather Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    They are from the book binding industry originally AFAIK, perhaps bone was cleaner than metal/wood which would have been the alternatives at the time?

    Charlie
     


  12. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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    Yes, the bone would have been cleaner. I suspect that metal would tend to tear the paper. You needed to be able to press quite hard on the paper/card but not tear it or leave marks on it. I suppose that, over time, printers found that the bone was just the right density for doing the job. Again, a bit like using a deer bone on leather. I note that bones for printers and bookbinders are still available on Amazon.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013


  13. Equus Leather

    Equus Leather Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    Ive always though the tiny but smooth fissures and imperfections in the surface of the bone help to polish/smooth as well, certainly on leather though I dont know about paper.

    If any one is keen on getting a bone folder and the Amazon ones dont suit for any reason I can get some from our tool suppliers - happy to do so if it would help anyone

    Charlie
     


  14. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I bet the FED's go around interrogating overly shiny shell people in hopes they will bust the black market for human bone shell shiners.
     


  15. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I guess that's in the eye of the beholder.

    In fact "bullhide" or "bullhide shoulder"...AKA "shrunken shoulder"... is a poor cut of leather. And it is seldom, if ever, actually bullhide. It can come from any older bovine animal. [There's nowhere near the number of actual bulls in the domesticated cattle herds being harvested for leather as there are cows. Not enough to meet even the marginal demand of the western boot industry. This is an instance where truth in advertising has triumphed and the term "shrunken shoulder" is now used in preference to the misleading "bullhide".]

    It is leather that in better times would not be considered premium under any circumstances. Hides that, in a more knowledgeable era, would simply not have been used for anything but industrial purposes.

    When the industry found out that if they subjected the longer fibered, less dense hides to a chemical and mechanical process which "shrinks" and compresses the fiber mat, they could market hitherto worthless hides and, "bullhide" was created. Nevermind the fact that the shrinking is artificial and hence fundamentally temporary and/or unstable.

    Or that the "texture" is also artificial and imposed. The raw hides are as smooth as calf or ordinarily marketed cowhide.

    And "bullhide" is, by every objective standard, a corrected grain leather.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013


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