Leather Quality and Properties

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by VegTan, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. OzzyJones

    OzzyJones Senior member

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    DW. I came across a UK company selling pure mutton tallow dubbin as a boot treatment. What are your thoughts on the efficacy of using this as a conditioner/protector and would you be for or against its use on calf leather?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    No problem. the thing that bothers me about VC is that it has a poison warning on the side of the box and a disclaimer that it contains petroleum distillates and turpentine. I wonder why they would reference petroleum distillates AND turp if they aren't two different ingredients.So what is the other ingredient? It could, I suppose, be mineral oil. Which might explain Horween's preference for it.

    PS (on edit) now that I think about it turpentine is a distillate of wood products...seems to me I recall Rausch Naval Yards talking about turpentine being a by-product of pitch and pine rosin manufacture.

    --
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013
  3. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Great for work boots. Use sparingly for dress shoes and only when nothing else is available.

    Do you have a link for the dubbin?
     
  4. OzzyJones

    OzzyJones Senior member

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    Thanks!
    Here's the link: http://www.trestleshop.com/mutton-tallow-boot-grease/

    but its horrendously expensive from this company.
    You can get the same stuff (I presume) in the states for 3 bucks a tin
     
  5. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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  6. OzzyJones

    OzzyJones Senior member

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  7. Munky

    Munky Senior member

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  8. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I wondered...I have some of that. I've been using it on my tools--just as the write-up says it should be used. I like it fine for tools, never tried it on leather. That said, I have a pint of rendered sheep's tallow that I use occasionally for softening waxes and so forth. I have used it on leather but as I say only on leather that was already stuffed.
    Thanks...
     
  9. OzzyJones

    OzzyJones Senior member

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    So, good for chromexcel and featherstone, not so much for boxcalf?
     
  10. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    That would be my take. It's not even so much that it would damage the calf but rather that subsequent waxes would not adhere or, esp., shine up. The tallow might have a tendency to darken some leathers as well and such products tend to collect dirt and other fines and hold them in the creases of the shoe. I believe that contributes to cracking.
     
  11. OzzyJones

    OzzyJones Senior member

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    Makes sense, thanks
     
  12. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Patrick,

    I finally got my first look at GlenKaren products. I'm more impressed than ever. The paste wax goes on so smooth and yet builds up so quickly. Glenjay had a pair of Lobbs that he spit-shined with the GlenKaren paste and they looked terrific. Lots of carnuba.

    The cream waxes are a little stiffer than Saphir or Meltonian but they went on my alligator/calf balmorals easily and a minute or two later I was buffing it to a good shine. The GK creams use orange oil as a solvent and it evaporates three (?) times faster than turpentine, but is a better solvent and cleaner than turp.

    The cleaner and conditioner took a little longer than the cream to penetrate the leather...as would be expected...but when it dried, it buffed up nicely. It also picked up dead/oxidized black polish from the shoe (cleaning) which I saw on my fingers. I used my fingers to apply all of the product...except the paste while spit shining...and it was nice to know that I wasn't absorbing petroleum distillates through my skin.

    One nice thing, too, is that there's two to three times as much product in the little jars as with either Saphir or Meltonian. Yet the amounts needed (and recommended) are probably half of what you need for other products. And if you use your fingers you won't be applying more cream to the cloth than to the shoe. One of these demi-jars is gonna last a good long time.

    I am quite enthusiastic about GlenKaren products and intend to include a jar with every shoe order.

    Anyway...first impressions...but I just don't see a downside.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013
  13. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    Good to hear, maybe I will try it next time when my current Saphir runs out (in like 2 years...?)
     
  14. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    Thanks for taking the time to post a review DW, I really appreciate it.

    in regard to evaporation speed: One of the main factors in determining evaporation speed is the Vapor Pressure (in millimeters of mercury) it takes for the ingredient to evaporate. The vapor pressure for turpentine is 4 mmHg, and the vapor pressure for orange oil is 1.4 mmHg (both at 68F/20C).

    How well a solvent works is measured by its Kauri-Butanol (Kb) value (the higher the number the stronger the solvent). Turpentine has a Kb value of 56, while orange oil has a Kb value of 67.

    The purpose of solvent in shoe polish is to keep in relatively soft (not a solid block of wax) so that it can be applied to a shoe and spread around. Once the polish is on the shoe you want the solvent to evaporate so as no to impede the wax from setting. The faster the evaporation the better the wax sets up because of the cooling effect related to evaporation heat transfer.

    This also means that the polish can use less solvent to accomplish the same thing (or better) than polish using turpentine or naphtha.
     
  15. VegTan

    VegTan Senior member

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    I totally understand your complain. Accepting it means asking an administrator to delete this thread. I thought you knew how this thread started, but you don't seem to know it.

    It was suggested to me at The Official Shoe Care Thread to gather my excerpts on that thread together and post them as a new thread for convenience. I try to select as accurate information as possible. If you find mistakes, please correct them. If you still dislike and feel uncomfortable about this thread, how about posting a new thread? I promise I'll never post on your thread.
     

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