Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Leather Quality and Properties

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by VegTan, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    192
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Location:
    Bend, Oregon
    

    In the cases where EG, etc... are dying the leather themselves, do you know if they are adding an acrylic finish coat?
     


  2. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    They most likely don't from the feel of their shoes. They don't dye the leather *until* shoes are constructed, as opposed to dying the leather before construction.
     


  3. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,422
    Likes Received:
    3,002
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    A perfectly serviceable acryllic wax "top coat" could be added after the shoe has been completed. In fact, I suspect crust leathers would be the better candidate for such a finish than leathers that have already been given a finish coat.

    On the other hand, the likelihood that the maker will heavily wax the shoes...for instance, bulling the toe...would probably make a subsequent finish coat problematic. I suspect the acryllic finish coat would not stick to the carnuba in most polishes.

    And on yet another hand, high gloss acryllics can be significantly more flexible than a high gloss spit shine over the entire shoe.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013


  4. gyasih

    gyasih Senior member

    Messages:
    5,475
    Likes Received:
    853
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Thank you
     


  5. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    192
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Location:
    Bend, Oregon
    

    I have a pair of JLP shoes in Museum Calf (as well as some other high end brands) and I certainly can't tell from feel if there is a light acrylic finish on them. Perhaps my fingers are not as sensitive as yours. :D

    I suspect that a light acrylic finish is applied to protect the leather during shipping, storage, and so on. But I don't know for sure.
     


  6. VegTan

    VegTan Senior member

    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    92
    Joined:
    May 4, 2013
    

    I am not sure, but It is possible if leather is tanned and/or shoes are made in a low-labor-cost country.



    It is said that casein is used, but I've never seen it.

    http://www.leatherchem.com/leather-chemicals.html
    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    I have never seen photos where shoemakers use chemicals except dyestuffs and shoe polishes/creams on the finishing of crust leather.

    BTW, these discontinued Scotch Grain (Japanese rtw shoemaker) were made out of Italian crust leathers (black, brown, and beige) and its finishing was left to consumers.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Some experiments on a brown crust leather.

     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2013


  7. Munky

    Munky Senior member

    Messages:
    1,701
    Likes Received:
    467
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    I am not sure, but It is possible if leather is tanned and/or shoes are made in a low-labor-cost country.


    Yes, they are made in India.
     


  8. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,504
    Likes Received:
    8,866
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    DWF, are pegs pre-made, or do you have to make them yourself? Also what kind of wood do you use?
     


  9. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,422
    Likes Received:
    3,002
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    Pre-made. We get them from Germany...they're lemonwood.

    But pegging really gained traction here in the US during the 1800's. In fact, pegging machines were invented and used widely during and after the Civil War. Pegs were pre-made then as well--of hard rock maple.

    The problem with US pegs today is not only the dearth of hard rock maple but the fact that all the peg cutting machines in existence in the US are actual Civil War era machines. A bag of US made pegs is likely to be alder and with so many "mutants" that probably less that 2 out of five are useable. The only reason they are still manufactured at all is that they are used as some sort of polishing medium (I've been told but I don't remember).

    Earlier, pegs were made by hand...sort of . A block of end grain was needed and then a specialized plane was used to cut a "V" shape in the endgrain, first in one direction, then perpendicular to the initial pass. Then a heavy hand knife was used to split the pegs along the "V". And again to separate individual pegs.

    Somewhere I have a lithograph of that plane.
     


  10. chogall

    chogall Senior member

    Messages:
    6,564
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    

    PM sent
     


  11. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,422
    Likes Received:
    3,002
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    
    Click on image to see it full size.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2013


  12. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    454
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Location:
    Norway
    What is the positive and negative effects of using remedies such as Filson Boot Oil or Obenauf's Leather Oil on regular calf as used by C&J, AE, etc.? I use Filson oil on my rough boots, but I'm interested in what would theoretically happen if I were to use it on some more delicate leather. Would the oil do much more damage than harm? I have no plans of changing it out with my Lexol conditioner, but just wondering what theoretically negative effects it would cause.
     


  13. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,504
    Likes Received:
    8,866
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Well, I have used Obenuef's on calf in the past. Basically it soaks into the leather really well, but it also makes it near impossible to get a shine because it is so oily. Also, the oily texture that it leaves attracts a lot of dust and dirt.
     


  14. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,422
    Likes Received:
    3,002
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    If the leather is not an oil stuffed leather, keep such products away form your shoes. Not only will the oil permanently change the grain surface and make shining your shoe impossible, in some instances it will actually lift the finish.

    What's more, mineral/petroleum based oils are not good for the leather--suffocating it, and will rot non-synthetic threads as well.
     


  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,504
    Likes Received:
    8,866
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Obenaufs isn't mineral/petroleum based, fwiw. Apparently 100% plant derived.

    What do you mean, "lift" the finish?
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by