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Leather Quality and Properties

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by VegTan, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Interesting...two nations separated by a common language. I've never heard it called a "block."

    Let me ask you something...if the last had a standard hinge, like this, for instance:

    [​IMG]


    Or a "hinge" like this:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    What would you call the instep portion of the last?

    Or, perhaps more to the point, what would Springline call the instep?

    Over here, our lastmakers (and shoemakers) call it the "cone" of the last.

    Over there? (just curious)

    edited for punctuation and clarity
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  2. vmss

    vmss Senior member

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    @DWF thank you for your answer, much appreciated.

    @ntempleman

    I have seen some very nice split toes on your Instagram. I am curious to learn what thickness of leather do you prefer to stitch a apron with?
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  3. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior member

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    I've never dealt with Sprinline for anything so I've no idea what they call things, but the instep portion is just called the instep, as far as I'm aware. I also wouldn't call a hinged last "standard"; they're a modern concession for making factory work quicker and easier, I think I've only ever seen 3 or 4 of them in my whole life so nothing standard about them from my point of view.

    Sewing satisfactory butted seams has more to do with the body of the leather than the thickness, but a typical men's weight for most shoes would be in the region of 1.2mm. Sometimes a thinner leather will accept being seen that way without tearing, sometimes a thicker leather will pull through on the surface. I have a feeling that plated leathers are less forgiving, my theory is that cooking on the hot plate will alter the grain's structure and be less strong as a result.
     
  4. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    :paranoia: Yet Mobbs & Lewis are out of Kettering and those illustrations are from the early 1900's (Golding).

    Not classically Traditional but not really "modern" in the conventional sense of the word, either.

    Certainly older than you or me.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  5. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior member

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    More modern than a last with a block cut out of it. Mobbs would have been set up to serve the newly built factories in Northampton at the time, the hinged lasts probably developed as a result of finding ways to speed up production and avoid mixing up loose blocks amongst the thousands of otherwise identical lasts floating about. A big metal hinge in the middle of a last is the last thing you'd want when making bespoke pairs, as soon as you start messing about with the bottom you'll start hitting the metal. None of the West End firms would have used a company like Mobbs either, there would've been no need as there was already a huge industry of last and tree makers in the area to support it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  6. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Well, I guess I just have a hard time seeing concepts that are probably twice as old as I am (71) as being "modern." In any other field they would be "vintage," if nothing else.

    Just as an aside the lasts in the third figure above are very similar to what i use. The lastmakers over here call them SAS hinges. (I used to know what SAS stood for) but the key thing there is that when the last is broken (the hinge opened) the last actually gets shorter. You can have a good curve on the back of the last and a very narrow comb and a tight, tight topline and still pull the last with zero strain on the backseam.
     
  7. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior member

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    Comparatively more modern. Duchamp's Fountain is still regarded as modern art, after all.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  8. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Springline calls the cut for the conventional two-piece last 'scooped'.
     
  9. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Not the question...what do they call the "instep" area of the last?
     
  10. DesB3rd

    DesB3rd New Member

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    You'll be hard pressed to find a leather lined mountain boot;it's all a weird unwoven textile (soft but seemingly indestructible) over padding of various thicknesses. Looking at a couple of examples the "advertised thickness" seems representative of the greatest monolithic thickness. I understand that composite thicknesses are more pliable that monolithic, so that may need factoring in.

    Anyway, we're well off the main stream of this thread...
     

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