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Leather Jackets: Post Pictures of the Best You've Seen/Owned?

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by RatherAnOddball, Jul 17, 2008.

  1. proteinnerd

    proteinnerd Well-Known Member

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    If you don't like them, you didn't like them, no skin off my back. They definitely aren't for the androgynous hipsters if that's what you are into.
    As for celebs, from memory Daniel Craig, Leo DiCaprio, Johnny Depp, Dave Grohl, Hugh Laurie (whether he is a list is debatable lol), P Diddy and others I can't think of. Check out the Thurston bros thread here to see some examples of good fitting jackets (or at least the fit I like)
     
  2. Distorbiant

    Distorbiant Well-Known Member

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    I didn't say they were bad jackets, I just said they look bad aesthetically in most fits posted on the internet. Then again the main demographic for Aero seems to be overwhite old white men. I've seen a few good fit pics in the sheene and board racer on younger dudes but they are rare.

    It's not hard to find good Lewis Leathers fits on the other hand.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. magicalporks

    magicalporks Well-Known Member

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    lol

    Personally I'm a fan of Lewis Leathers. It's definitely stiff stuff though.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. proteinnerd

    proteinnerd Well-Known Member

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    Thats pretty much the androgynous hipster look that if you like, most Aero jackets probably won't be to your taste. The thickness of the leather they use is akin to real motorcycle jacket leathers...its just too thick for most fashion jacket wearers and doesn't give the drape they are after.
     
  5. Distorbiant

    Distorbiant Well-Known Member

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    You keep using that word.

    I do not think it means what you think it means.
     
    7 people like this.
  6. nicelynice

    nicelynice Well-Known Member

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    damn androgynous hipsters and their fashion jacket drape! :censored:
     
    11 people like this.
  7. Distorbiant

    Distorbiant Well-Known Member

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    REAL MEN wear REAL MOTORCYCLE LEATHER!
     
  8. proteinnerd

    proteinnerd Well-Known Member

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    an·drog·y·nous

    adjective \an-ˈdrä-jə-nəs\
    : having both male and female characteristics or qualities


    Thats exactly what I think it means and I think it describes that look perfectly. I'm not trying to be derogatory, if thats what you like, what do I care. Dress how you want.... how else would you describe it though?
     
  9. Distorbiant

    Distorbiant Well-Known Member

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    He doesn't look androgynous. Just Japanese. He has stubble on his face.

    Also androgynous shouldn't be an insult.

    Then again, I am responding to a guy who named himself @proteinnerd lmao
     
  10. ChrisGold

    ChrisGold Well-Known Member

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    To try to pull this back on topic, I believe the subject was quality, and not aesthetics. Aero is an almost exclusively MTM company, use very high quality leather (Horween and others), the jackets are made by single machinists (no assembly line) and when people have fit issues, the typical story is one of Aero saying no problem and either fixing the original jacket or crafting an entirely new jacket until the customer is satisfied. When you look at the stitch work on the jacket (noting that many period pieces are done in a contrast stitch, where mistakes would be glaring) they really are very well made jackets. In the world of $2500 to $3000 fashion jackets (and I don't use that derogatorily) some consider it a great bargain at $1000 - $1200 to get exactly what you want, especially when here in North America we can use the fit jacket program.

    In terms of aesthetics, to each their own. Aero's specialty is recreating period pieces... military, motorcycle, working jackets. Owning a Board Racer and a Ridley, I can attest that they can produce some great slim fit jackets also, but it's a smaller part of their business. (Ironically, on another forum, there is some debate about Thurston preferring TOO slim a fit, although I don't share that concern, since they are again, MTM) It should be noted that wearing a slim fit jacket made from their typical leathers would be uncomfortable for most consumers. Because Thurston has such great experience with motorcycle leathers, in my opinion they do a very nice job getting a fit that is balanced between slim and practical.
     
  11. Vordhosbn1

    Vordhosbn1 Active Member

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    If you're using celebs to gauge a jacket makers worth, then Lewis Leathers wins hands down... that and the racing history and cafe racer culture with it.
    I don't think they're easy brands to compare as they offer quite different products.
    Regards leather choices Aero offer a much larger range of options that have more character and have great aging potential. Lewis use a very uniform, fine grained cow hide that is suprisingly supple for the weight but provides a 'cleaner' appearance. On fit alone Lewis jackets have worked for me as they are slim in the right places. That said, design wise the cafe offerings from Aero look incredible.
     
  12. hokuto

    hokuto Well-Known Member

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    My Aero is coming next week and I'm really looking forward to it, I find my fashion tastes change more and more to classic menswear and I wanted something that would age well with me as I get older. If you're going to call a horse a horse and say that a lot of Aero's demographic is older heavier white guys than you got to admit at least the guy on the right is pretty androgynous and that to an athletic person both of those guys are pretty thin. Both of which in the end is really your own personal preference for body type as I'm sure the thin guys would do fine in a Aero cafe/board racer and a heavy guy can rock a double rider (and most likely be representative of an actual biker that wears one).

    Here's a pic of the Aero that Leo had in Inception


    [​IMG]
     
  13. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member

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    Moscow, Idaho
    
    Always try to imagine the product outside the context in which it's styled. That is what designers, and stylish dressers, do. Otherwise, you are always going to be limited by the imagination of others.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member

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    Stitch density, uniform tension, and consistency. Leather quality.
     
    2 people like this.
  15. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but how to do you arbitrate between two similar makers? Aero and Vanson, for example? Or to give other comparisons, MMM and RO, Buzz and Real McCoy, Cucinelli and Loro Piana, etc. I think this stuff is easy on the extremes, but not so much when you have two similar makers.

    The stitch density, IMO, gets a bit trickier with leather, as so much depends on the material you're working with. As you know, the higher the stitch density on a heavy leather, the more likely it's going to rip. The line between "good" and "bad" high stitch counts isn't something that's easy for a general consumer to discern.

    Few people on here are buying H&M leathers, so after a certain point, I assume the stitch count for all the makers talked about on this board is simply "good."

    For leather quality, I can only tell the difference between a smooth part of the hide and something that has more wrinkles, scars, or fat deposits. Other than that, a lot seems to be about taste, and whether the maker cut the hide well to accommodate the grain and what not. The second part is only discernible after a lot of wear, and again -- I think a lot of what ends up looking good is about taste and aesthetics. Not necessarily about quality.
     
    3 people like this.
  16. LaymanX

    LaymanX Well-Known Member

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    I've owned 2 Aeros (and sold them both due to fit issues). While the fit ultimately wasn't right for me, I can say that the construction, leather quality of my jackets were fantastic. You hold it and it feels like something you can pass onto your children, which is pretty amazing in a world dominated by trendy fast fashion.

    I've never owned a ToJ (sold my spot), but own a Schott and a Golden Bear, and Aero jackets aren't even in the same tier by a long shot.

    I'm currently in the queue for an Aero Sheene (eta early Dec) so here's hoping third time's the charm.
     
  17. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Well-Known Member

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    Weight and "solidness" seems to come up a lot when people discuss leather jackets, but what's commonly considered to be the Golden Age of vintage motorcycle jackets had a ton of unlined, lightweight pieces. 1920s-30s had lightweight suede and capeskins, often unlined, and meant to be worn like windbreakers. Here's one from the 30s, via Vintage Leather Jacket (the blog run the Himel Brothers guy). This would have felt incredibly lightweight:


    [​IMG]


    I'm not sure if weight and quality are the same thing. "Solid feeling" also seems to be another way of referring to weight (I assume that's what you meant when you said you could pass something on to your children).

    Perhaps also worth noting that on a lightweight piece like the one above, the stitches per inch count near that Talon zipper also doesn't seem too high. IMO, the stitch count for leather isn't as straightforward as it might be on other garments, like shirts.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014
    2 people like this.
  18. LaymanX

    LaymanX Well-Known Member

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    It's not just the 'weight' of the leather however. It's the reinforcement of high stress areas, the heavy duty Talon zippers, the fact that they are able to work with this heavy FQHH and make such precise folds and stitches with it. It's hard to describe, but it just feels without a doubt like 'high quality'. Everything just feels like it will last a long time.

    That said, it's definitely not everyone's cup of tea. The majority of Aero's cuts are not meant for the SF crowd, so you have to navigate carefully.

    Edit: Also I *believe* that Aero is the only leatherworker using Horween heavy FQHH. There is a pretty big difference between calf/lamb and Horween heavy FQHH.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  19. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Well-Known Member

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    Not to hound you, but wouldn't these things just be aspects of design? (Aside from "precise folds and stitches." I don't know what that refers to).

    There are plenty of jackets that many of us would consider to be high quality, but don't have reinforcements on high stress areas or Talon zippers. Some (gasp) even have YKK zippers. But we'd still call them high quality.

    I feel like when someone asks about whether something is "high quality," like that poster who asked earlier about MMM, they're asking for something more objective. What they get, however, are people giving their subjective opinions on design aspects (maybe they don't like washed leather or whatever).

    To give an extreme example, this is like someone asking "Is this high quality?" And someone answering "No, it is red, not blue."

    Quality and design seem to be separate things. At least in their ideals. I realize things kind of meld together in fashion, but it seems kind of useless if and when the topic of quality comes up, people just talk about whether they like the design.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014
    3 people like this.
  20. hokuto

    hokuto Well-Known Member

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    You're right in that it's partially design, but from my fit jacket it really is exceptional that they are able to work with materials this thick. It's like saying that a rolls Royce has a exceptional design but also has exceptional craftsmanship to assembly said designs.
     

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