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Learn from me...stay focused

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by william, Jul 10, 2009.

  1. william

    william Senior member

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    I've never hurt myself lifting weights...until today. I was squatting 225 using the Starting Strength program, and was concentrating on keeping my knees out and achieving proper depth. Too bad I forgot to keep my chest up and lower back tight. The end result was a muscle pull in my back that makes it hard to even walk or sit up that well.

    I'm learning the hard way to respect the weight I'm lifting and to keep everything tight at all times.

    I hope I'm good to go again in a week's time, but it could be two. This really sucks, as I was really starting to make some good progress.

    Another thing...in Starting Strength increases of five pounds per workout seem to the standard. That worked for a month or so but I think fractional plates and one to two pound increases are the way to go from here on out. I just think it's safer to progress slowly.
     
  2. turbozed

    turbozed Senior member

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    That sucks man. I thought I tore something in my shoulder while doing my OHP's a couple of days ago. I was seriously pissed. Turns out it was fully healed within 10 minutes and I was able to do the power cleans afterwards. I was pretty happy about that. Look up some rehab exercises and get a lot of food and rest.
     
  3. william

    william Senior member

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    Thanks man. It's actually already starting to feel a little better. Right after it happened I could barely get the weights off the bar.

    I'm definitely gonna drop back down to 215 and inch my way up with my new fractional plates though.

    I completed my 225x5x3 albeit with a pulled muscle, which probably doesn't count as successful. I find that it's pretty hard to keep all the points of the squat straight in my mind when the weight gets heavy (225 is heavy for me).
     
  4. Eason

    Eason Senior member

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    If it makes you feel better, I added 10 lbs successfully today. [​IMG]
     
  5. aoluffy

    aoluffy Senior member

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    yeah i remember listening to some michael jackson whilst squatting.

    i think it was beat it and my body just loosened up as if ready to dance. lol.
     
  6. LS7

    LS7 Senior member

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    Funny, suffered the same injury myself last Sunday, albeit at a lighter weight. I was back squatting by Wednesday and lifted again today at 10lbs below my highweight. Your strain sounds a little more serious so my advice would be to wait until you're fully healed.

    With you on the progression too. The plates are in kgs over here and the lightest are 1.25s, so I have little choice but to go in 5lb increments. It may be going against the advice of SS, but I've been staying on the same weight for a couple of workouts before progressing.
     
  7. Deluks917

    Deluks917 Senior member

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    Who said if you don't get hurt you aren't training hard enough?
     
  8. william

    william Senior member

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    Funny, suffered the same injury myself last Sunday, albeit at a lighter weight. I was back squatting by Wednesday and lifted again today at 10lbs below my highweight. Your strain sounds a little more serious so my advice would be to wait until you're fully healed.

    With you on the progression too. The plates are in kgs over here and the lightest are 1.25s, so I have little choice but to go in 5lb increments. It may be going against the advice of SS, but I've been staying on the same weight for a couple of workouts before progressing.


    That's exactly what I was thinking of doing until I found the fractionals at Iron Woody (ridiculous name I know). That way I can keep adding weight, even if it's just a pound at a time. They sell them in kilos too.

    Who said if you don't get hurt you aren't training hard enough?

    Well, if I wasn't pushing myself I probably wouldn't have gotten hurt, so I can see the truth in that.

    Also it's good that I learned this lesson at 225 and not 315+. I know a guy who does his sets across (last time I saw him lift) with 435lb/deadlift and 400lb/squat. He gets hella focused before the lift and won't talk to anyone. I actually see the usefulness in that now, as a fuckup in form with 400 pounds on your back could have dire consequences.
     
  9. why

    why Senior member

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    I've never hurt myself lifting weights...until today. I was squatting 225 using the Starting Strength program, and was concentrating on keeping my knees out and achieving proper depth. Too bad I forgot to keep my chest up and lower back tight. The end result was a muscle pull in my back that makes it hard to even walk or sit up that well. I'm learning the hard way to respect the weight I'm lifting and to keep everything tight at all times. I hope I'm good to go again in a week's time, but it could be two. This really sucks, as I was really starting to make some good progress. Another thing...in Starting Strength increases of five pounds per workout seem to the standard. That worked for a month or so but I think fractional plates and one to two pound increases are the way to go from here on out. I just think it's safer to progress slowly.
    Erm, progression isn't linear. Stop thinking that way. Starting Strength is not a complete program, it's just a way of learning exercises and basic programming until moving onto other things. Most basic strength programs just adjust volume and total weekly workload. In other words, something like five weeks progressing with the weights being incremented and then an off week or week with reduced volume (something like 3x3 or 1x5) before adding weight again. It depends where the trainee is at, the exercise, other goals, etc. I'll also add that most people add weight and don't actually do any extra work -- they just don't go down as far or mess with their form to wiggle the weight up. This is usually how injuries occur. When I used to train people these exercises there was always a benchmark for them to reach -- if it wasn't reached, no weight was added. I suggest people use something like the safety bars on the full cage to judge depth and incrementally add weights each time they lift instead of tossing on the plates their program calls for and getting started. Most people don't squat far enough at all and end up placing the majority of stress on their spine instead of the much stronger and more elastic hip and knee joints. EDIT: Oh, and you probably have a herniated disc.
     
  10. william

    william Senior member

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    Erm, progression isn't linear. Stop thinking that way. Starting Strength is not a complete program, it's just a way of learning exercises and basic programming until moving onto other things. Most basic strength programs just adjust volume and total weekly workload. In other words, something like five weeks progressing with the weights being incremented and then an off week or week with reduced volume (something like 3x3 or 1x5) before adding weight again. It depends where the trainee is at, the exercise, other goals, etc. I'll also add that most people add weight and don't actually do any extra work -- they just don't go down as far or mess with their form to wiggle the weight up. This is usually how injuries occur. When I used to train people these exercises there was always a benchmark for them to reach -- if it wasn't reached, no weight was added. I suggest people use something like the safety bars on the full cage to judge depth and incrementally add weights each time they lift instead of tossing on the plates their program calls for and getting started. Most people don't squat far enough at all and end up placing the majority of stress on their spine instead of the much stronger and more elastic hip and knee joints. EDIT: Oh, and you probably have a herniated disc.
    Interesting. I've actually been at SS for about five weeks. How would you approach SS? I see your recommendation above but would you use the five week then break protocol with any program you used? Also...how long might a herniated disc take to heal?
     
  11. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    ^ might never be the same.
     
  12. thekunk07

    thekunk07 Senior member

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    i see this every day. guy on the incline bench did 20 "reps" at 225 today, each rep ROM averaging about 6 inches


    Erm, progression isn't linear. Stop thinking that way.

    Starting Strength is not a complete program, it's just a way of learning exercises and basic programming until moving onto other things. Most basic strength programs just adjust volume and total weekly workload. In other words, something like five weeks progressing with the weights being incremented and then an off week or week with reduced volume (something like 3x3 or 1x5) before adding weight again. It depends where the trainee is at, the exercise, other goals, etc.

    I'll also add that most people add weight and don't actually do any extra work -- they just don't go down as far or mess with their form to wiggle the weight up. This is usually how injuries occur. When I used to train people these exercises there was always a benchmark for them to reach -- if it wasn't reached, no weight was added. I suggest people use something like the safety bars on the full cage to judge depth and incrementally add weights each time they lift instead of tossing on the plates their program calls for and getting started. Most people don't squat far enough at all and end up placing the majority of stress on their spine instead of the much stronger and more elastic hip and knee joints.

    EDIT: Oh, and you probably have a herniated disc.
     
  13. turbozed

    turbozed Senior member

    Messages:
    564
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    Mar 21, 2006
    Erm, progression isn't linear. Stop thinking that way.

    Starting Strength is not a complete program, it's just a way of learning exercises and basic programming until moving onto other things. Most basic strength programs just adjust volume and total weekly workload. In other words, something like five weeks progressing with the weights being incremented and then an off week or week with reduced volume (something like 3x3 or 1x5) before adding weight again. It depends where the trainee is at, the exercise, other goals, etc.

    I'll also add that most people add weight and don't actually do any extra work -- they just don't go down as far or mess with their form to wiggle the weight up. This is usually how injuries occur. When I used to train people these exercises there was always a benchmark for them to reach -- if it wasn't reached, no weight was added. I suggest people use something like the safety bars on the full cage to judge depth and incrementally add weights each time they lift instead of tossing on the plates their program calls for and getting started. Most people don't squat far enough at all and end up placing the majority of stress on their spine instead of the much stronger and more elastic hip and knee joints.

    EDIT: Oh, and you probably have a herniated disc.


    This is spot on and something I've noticed in my own experience with SS. I was making what I thought was remarkable progress until I hit a wall in some exercises. My form was a little off on the DL, squat, BP, and OHP (not to mention power cleans which I think I'll never perfect). I had to go back and relearn almost all of it. Now I feel a lot more comfortable with the lifts and I'm very strict on form and ROM. You want to eliminate as many variables as possible and keeping strict form will give you a better indication of how your body is responding. Now I'm making slower progress, but I know for sure that it is progress and not me cheating myself.
     
  14. william

    william Senior member

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    ^ might never be the same.

    Actually it's a muscle on the right side of my back so I doubt it has anything to do with my spine.
     
  15. Taxler

    Taxler Senior member

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    Also...how long might a herniated disc take to heal?


    It took me 6 weeks to get back to 100% the first time; it took closer to 6 months the second.
     
  16. why

    why Senior member

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    Interesting. I've actually been at SS for about five weeks.

    How would you approach SS? I see your recommendation above but would you use the five week then break protocol with any program you used?


    Not always. It depends on feel and it's something only experience really teaches. Just don't get stuck in your ways; adjust according to what's necessary and not what you feel like doing. If you lift 3x5 and legitimately keep adding weight, keep on going. If you stall at some point and miss a set, come back after a little rest and try again. If you miss again, reduce volume (cut reps but keep the sets is usually best) and then try again. It's not exact and you'll learn -- just be honest and forthright with yourself.

    Greatly varies from one week to never.

    Actually it's a muscle on the right side of my back so I doubt it has anything to do with my spine.

    If it's a pulled spinal erector this won't take long to heal usually. Herniated discs, however, often radiate pain since the entire area is extremely innervated and this makes pinpointing an origin difficult (think of getting kicked in the nuts and feeling it in the stomach -- it's a nervous system thing).

    A pulled spinal erector is pretty easy to diagnose since they're uncommon and the pain is clearly felt as if the muscle misfired. If the pain isn't felt until after the set it's usually a herniated disc because of the lag time involved with fluid leakage and inflammation buildup and such.

    Best of luck.
     
  17. ZackyBoy

    ZackyBoy Senior member

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    Don't fret. I've caused myself sciatica, pulled muscles by the dozens and numerous other back injuries. Just learn from it.
     
  18. jcool20010

    jcool20010 Member

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    I severely doubt that it is a herniated disk.
     
  19. bbaquiran

    bbaquiran Senior member

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    That's exactly what I was thinking of doing until I found the fractionals at Iron Woody (ridiculous name I know). That way I can keep adding weight, even if it's just a pound at a time. They sell them in kilos too.

    I too ordered a set of fractional plates from Iron Woody a couple of days ago. They should arrive in a week or so. In the meantime I'm using short lengths of chain clipped to the barbell collars for microloading.
     
  20. bbaquiran

    bbaquiran Senior member

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    I've never hurt myself lifting weights...until today. I was squatting 225 using the Starting Strength program, and was concentrating on keeping my knees out and achieving proper depth. Too bad I forgot to keep my chest up and lower back tight. The end result was a muscle pull in my back that makes it hard to even walk or sit up that well.

    That sucks man. I thought I tore something in my shoulder while doing my OHP's a couple of days ago. I was seriously pissed. Turns out it was fully healed within 10 minutes and I was able to do the power cleans afterwards. I was pretty happy about that. Look up some rehab exercises and get a lot of food and rest.

    Funny, suffered the same injury myself last Sunday, albeit at a lighter weight. I was back squatting by Wednesday and lifted again today at 10lbs below my highweight. Your strain sounds a little more serious so my advice would be to wait until you're fully healed.

    Rippetoe has some rehab advice here. I don't know if it's good or not, but might be worth a shot.
     

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