• Hi, I am the owner and main administrator of Styleforum. If you find the forum useful and fun, please help support it by buying through the posted links on the forum. Our main, very popular sales thread, where the latest and best sales are listed, are posted HERE

    Purchases made through some of our links earns a commission for the forum and allows us to do the work of maintaining and improving it. Finally, thanks for being a part of this community. We realize that there are many choices today on the internet, and we have all of you to thank for making Styleforum the foremost destination for discussions of menswear.
  • This site contains affiliate links for which Styleforum may be compensated.
  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

    Styleforum is supported in part by commission earning affiliate links sitewide. Please support us by using them. You may learn more here.

Lawyer, Law School, BigLaw FAQ

crazyquik

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 8, 2007
Messages
8,984
Reaction score
44
I'm guessing dropping at a bar to a lady that I just made GS15 probably isn't that effective
confused.gif
 

yerfdog

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2006
Messages
1,320
Reaction score
2
Originally Posted by crazyquik
Proctor & Gamble hire law students with no experience. One of those biotech seed companies (maybe Monsanto, or one of their competitors) also does. Companies who's business is to own land (oil companies, natural gas companies, perhaps some mining & mineral companies, and maybe the major home-builders) directly hire law students to be Landsmen, who check property titles to make sure they are correct and figure out how to quiet the title if needed. These are the exceptions, not the rule. Most major corporations prefer 3-5 years of law firm work.
I think I've heard of Cargill hiring new grads.

Speaking of oil companies, they also hire new grad attorneys for their tax departments. I have a friend who was hired by Texaco as a tax attorney, and I think he was starting out at $125K. In Houston that will buy you a nice size house.
 

Swag22

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2008
Messages
117
Reaction score
0
So I assume when people refer to private practice, they mean opening their own firm or working from home? How many years, if any, does it take to become successful in this area of law? Same question about possible salary and hours. Thanks
 

RedLantern

Distinguished Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2008
Messages
5,167
Reaction score
3,906
No, private practice is working in a private law firm. As in not gov'mint or in house counsel.
 

enigma7

Active Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
25
Reaction score
0
i wondering.....is it possible to land a job at a private firm making $100k plus after having attended a tier 2 to tier 4 school?
 

ziggysnorkel

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2008
Messages
64
Reaction score
0
Originally Posted by enigma7
i wondering.....is it possible to land a job at a private firm making $100k plus after having attended a tier 2 to tier 4 school?
Yeah it is...you can even work at a top tier firm making $160k right out of a tier 4 law school, but you have to be at very close to the top of your class. I have a couple friends who have done it.
 

odoreater

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
8,587
Reaction score
45
Originally Posted by enigma7
i wondering.....is it possible to land a job at a private firm making $100k plus after having attended a tier 2 to tier 4 school?

Yes, especially if said tier 2 school is in the state where the firm is located. For example, in New Jersey, the top NJ firms (that have starting salaries anywhere between $135k - $160k) hire pretty deep into the classes of Rutgers and Seton Hall (the two NJ law schools that are both tier 2).
 

crazyquik

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 8, 2007
Messages
8,984
Reaction score
44
Originally Posted by odoreater
Yes, especially if said tier 2 school is in the state where the firm is located. For example, in New Jersey, the top NJ firms (that have starting salaries anywhere between $135k - $160k) hire pretty deep into the classes of Rutgers and Seton Hall (the two NJ law schools that are both tier 2).

Alternatively, don't plan to graduate from the University of Alabama (which is a fine law school) and then work in San Francisco or NYC at a 160k firm (although a Cout of Appeals clerkship would make that move a lot easier). For the majority of law schools (and firms), hiring is regional. Atlanta, Nashville, Birmingham, and perhaps New Oreans would be the larger markets that Alabama would serve.
 

airportlobby

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2007
Messages
1,627
Reaction score
19
The logic behind the OP's questioning, IMO, represents the sort of reasoning that explains why so many lawyers are unhappy with their careers and why so many burn out of the profession early - you can't choose the law based on big firm starting salaries, or what career will be the quickest path to an M3. You should choose a profession based on an affinity for the work and for the people within the career. Lawyering well, whether at a 40-hour a week state government job or an 80-hour week NYC firm requires intellectual dedication.

Once you take out a loan to pay for the first semester of law school, it's just about too late to change your mind that you don't want to do this work or spend your working life with these people. You are already in the hole a **** ton of money and therefore, of course, need a career to pay off the debt. Get a job or internship where you can decide if you like lawyering and spending time with lawyers before you pay for that first semester. And do as well on your LSAT as possible (and it should be possible to be almost perfect).
 

Tardek

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2008
Messages
613
Reaction score
1
I am kind of glad in a way - law in one of the top three universities in my State (probably top 5 in the country) has only sunk me into between $50-60k of debt from start to finish.
 

mr_economy

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2006
Messages
176
Reaction score
0
Anyone here do work in constitutional law?

That's my passion, my interest. Has been ever since I took two semesters of conlaw as an undergrad. The "prof" wasn't a prof at all, but a lecturer with a JD who formerly worked for BigLaw in St. Louis. She told us from day one she would be teaching the class like a law school one, and she wasn't kidding - Socratic Method, law briefs, reading 150 pages of cases a week - it was intense, and I loved every minute of it.

But is there any money to be made in conlaw? I don't want to live the BigLaw life. I want to do public service work. My biggest concern would be finding a school with connections (court clerkships and such) that I could also afford to pay for with a public law salary.
 

bluemagic

Distinguished Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2008
Messages
2,974
Reaction score
1
Does anyone know something about environmental plaintiffs' firms?
 

DNW

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2006
Messages
9,976
Reaction score
6
Originally Posted by mr_economy
Anyone here do work in constitutional law?

That's my passion, my interest. Has been ever since I took two semesters of conlaw as an undergrad. The "prof" wasn't a prof at all, but a lecturer with a JD who formerly worked for BigLaw in St. Louis. She told us from day one she would be teaching the class like a law school one, and she wasn't kidding - Socratic Method, law briefs, reading 150 pages of cases a week - it was intense, and I loved every minute of it.

But is there any money to be made in conlaw? I don't want to live the BigLaw life. I want to do public service work. My biggest concern would be finding a school with connections (court clerkships and such) that I could also afford to pay for with a public law salary.


If your passion is ConLaw, accept the fact that you will not make a lot of money after you graduate. But, you can still make a decent living working for the DOJ, the ACLU, or clerking somewhere. So, your priority is to get into the best law school you can afford. If you go to a public school, it's going to be cheaper than a private school. But, you may be limited to the state that you reside in. Obviously, if you can get a big scholarship and financial aid to a private school, it would make it less costly for you to go to a public school.

In short, ConLaw is not the field that pays. If you're passionate about it, it will make your life more enjoyable even if you can't afford most of the stuff your corporate counterpart makes.
 

cheessus

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2008
Messages
2,462
Reaction score
3
I've heard that if you work for the government, a lot of, if not all, of your student loans may be forgiven. Also I've seen that if you promise to work for the government (in what capacity, I forgot), they will give you 50K straight up. Can anyone confirm or deny this?

I'm in law school right now, and I have little to no intention of working for the government, so I haven't really looked into this at all. I may be making up this whole thing, I don't know...
 

Featured Sponsor

How important is full vs half canvas to you for heavier sport jackets?

  • Definitely full canvas only

    Votes: 87 37.7%
  • Half canvas is fine

    Votes: 87 37.7%
  • Really don't care

    Votes: 25 10.8%
  • Depends on fabric

    Votes: 36 15.6%
  • Depends on price

    Votes: 36 15.6%

Forum statistics

Threads
506,638
Messages
10,590,995
Members
224,297
Latest member
vmanrob
Top