Law Schools - Where and Why?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by El Argentino, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Likes Received:
    98
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    [COLOR=FF00AA]Where?:

    1a. The highest ranked
    1b. The least expensive

    Why?:

    1a: Because you want a job
    1b. Because you don't want to be in debt for the rest of your adult life.[/COLOR]
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2011


  2. Ebichuman

    Ebichuman Senior member

    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    140
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Location:
    North and East from the centre
    ^^^

    Good points. Graduate level education in the US is very expensive but top schools' degrees virtually guarantee your employ. Also, something not to overlook is the amount of stipend, grants, etc one can get. Top schools (Harvard is one of them) actually forgive portion of your tuition if you agree to work in the non-profit area for a period of time (post graduation).

    I'd say go for the best you can get (based on your grades, LSATs, recommendations) because even though they can be expensive the payback time is the shortest once you land a good job.

    On the other hand there's a coming glut of law graduates so....
     


  3. sns23

    sns23 Senior member

    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    15
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2011
    GPA does not hold much weight. It's about the lsat, which has a questionable correlation to law school success.



     


  4. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Likes Received:
    98
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Although pretty much every field of employment sucks right now, law really sucks. It sucks unbelievably. It sucks so hard that Georgetown grads are stuck doing doc review in windowless basements for 20 bucks an hour with no hope of being picked up as an associate. I'm not kidding about this.

    There is an enormous supply of new lawyers coming out of American law schools every year and not nearly enough jobs for everyone. Unless you're going to a top &14 law school with good scholarship money (unless it's HYS), I would think long and hard about it.

    Go read about about Emory's 2011 class. Not pretty.
     


  5. silvere2

    silvere2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    

    Listen to this man, he knows. I wouldn't attend a school that's not T14 + UT, UCLA, Vandy and maybe BU at all, unless you're going completely free and don't mind losing 3 years of your life and possibly ending up unemployed. As LB said, look at Emory, look at Notre Dame, look at other schools in that range. These are fairly prestigious schools that are getting destroyed in this economy. There is a HUGE dropoff in hiring outside of the Top 17 or so, just look at the difference in employment statistics between Wash U or GW and Vanderbilt or Georgetown to get an idea at how big of a difference there is. There's no way I would attend a school outside the Top 6 at full price, and even that's a risk, at NYU for example a decent chunk of the class is having trouble finding jobs at the latest OCI.

    Also, check out www.lawschooltransparency.com for some more accurate employment stats. They're not perfect, but they're much better than the stats reported by US News.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2011


  6. sns23

    sns23 Senior member

    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    15
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2011
    lol at only attending top 6.
     


  7. silvere2

    silvere2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    

    At full price. Read more carefully.
     


  8. Ebichuman

    Ebichuman Senior member

    Messages:
    537
    Likes Received:
    140
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Location:
    North and East from the centre
    

    I disagree. I didn't know anyone that didn't have stellar grades and 90+ percentile tests at the top schools (Law and Business) I was at.

    The LSAT may not be predictor of success IN law school but a high score sure as heck is a must to get in.
     


  9. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Likes Received:
    98
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    

    I'd probably only attend a t6 at full price. You have to understand that full price for law school can easily hit 160k or more for three years, which basically means you have to land a market paying job afterwards to hope to repay your loans. A lot of schools towards the bottom of the t14 can't guarantee that anymore.
     


  10. silvere2

    silvere2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    

    Not to mention that the LSAT has more predictive value in terms of first year law school grades than any other quantifiable factor a law student may bring to the table, including GPA.

    http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1184302
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2011


  11. inq89

    inq89 Senior member

    Messages:
    457
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2009
    So glad I helped talk my brother out of law school, he dropped out after his 1L year from a low ranked school, and is now going into a completely different field. Think I saved him 2 years of his life and thousands of loan dollars.

    Do the right thing and go into the medical field OP. Same amount of studying, but at least you'll have a bigger chance of getting hired somewhere with more money lol
     


  12. ConcernedParent

    ConcernedParent Senior member

    Messages:
    4,234
    Likes Received:
    30
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Location:
    West Coast is back for all you suckas
    


    I'm talking strictly about getting in. All sources indicate GPA along with LSAT= in.




    :fu:. I'm fairly confident I will get in somewhere in the t14+UCLA, given that my work habits don't significantly taper off towards graduation or while studying for the LSAT. Money isn't really that big of a deal to me because I've been spoiled silly with a fortunate situation. I'm mostly worried about the bloodbath it is for newly grads; is it really that bad for a t14+UCLA grad (lets count UCLA since, Los Angeles is one place I know for sure I wouldn't mind living/practicing in)? The anecdote about Gtown grads I hope is more of a hyperbolic exception than the norm.

    This along with the fact that, lets face it, I'm going to graduate with an impractical humanities degree. Though I have nearly as much of a quantitative background as business admin or econ majors, a good gpa and I attend a good school ("great" here on the left coast), it's going to be hard to convince employers that I can do anything besides HR monkey work. I feel backed into a corner and unsure what to do. I've been told all my life that getting into a good college was the "ticket", then when I got here I was told getting into a good grad program was the "ticket"- now that that's beginning to line up, my naivety is starting to realize that not only are there no free lunches, but shit is brutal even towards the top. needmoarprozac.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011


  13. sns23

    sns23 Senior member

    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    15
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2011


    Of course you need both high grades and a high test score to get into the top schools. I was attempting to say that don't expect to get into a good school just because you have a high gpa. I have a friend who got into a top 20 with a sub 3.0
     


  14. MattR

    MattR Senior member

    Messages:
    671
    Likes Received:
    84
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    

    From what I hear, it really is that bad for just about everyone.

    Again, a lot of it depends on what you want to do with the degree. If you want to practice, find a practice area that's typically in demand and won't be as susceptible to the technology revolution (ex. domestic relations). But don't think that any school guarantees you a Big Law job.

    Use your alumni contacts. Obviously, not a guarantee, but most are usually happy to talk with you, and who knows where it leads. Similarly, take internships, especially if you can get credit (yeah, it sucks to pay to work, but it's usually one less test you have to take).

    Make it out of the first year within the Top 25% of your class, and hopefully better.
     


  15. silvere2

    silvere2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    

    Ok, then I think this is a good question to ask before giving more advice: Where do you most want to live, where would you not mind living, and where (if anywhere, usually people say midwest, or the south) do you absolutely NOT want to live?
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by