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Language Most Useful?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by dmash, Mar 5, 2011.

  1. aphextwin07

    aphextwin07 Senior member

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  2. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    Mongolian and Klingon.

    Doing business in China requires Mandarin

    +1

    It's more or less essential, especially if you're trying to sell them something.
     
  3. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    Ok now I am sorry for posting twice under the same thread, but I have to do this since both post addresses different issues.

    If you are actually interested in studying Chinese the "immersion way",


    There are many people in China who want to study English this way, and will pay good money to some quite expensive English immersion schools.
     
  4. Matt

    Matt Senior member

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    So really, the key is that you should know enough that they won't be sure what you know? If they know you know some, they won't be sure enough to openly do that crap in front of you (especially since a lot of language learners understand *far* more than they can speak)

    I do it all the time.

    Basically people turn and confer in Vietnamese in front of me a lot. My VNese is OK (tough fucking language btw) but certainly far from business-grade and I will sit there and listen, understanding enough to know what is going on, but not the details of it.

    When there is a point being made between them that I am 100 percent certain I understood, details and all, I interject and answer in English.

    Then time stops.

    Everyone assumes that I have understood absolutely everything.

    Then nothing happens in Vietnamese again for the rest of the meeting.
     
  5. Destination_Arubin

    Destination_Arubin New Member

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    I guess if you're going to a business level, which is pretty damn high I'd stick with something like Spanish or French because I think they're slightly easier to get good at than say Chinese or Japanese.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that they're easier, but I think the language sentence structure is more similar than Asian languages to English which makes learning them maybe slightly easier.
     
  6. SirGrotius

    SirGrotius Senior member

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    I'm actually going medical. I've got about a year of Spanish..........but I'm just wanting to learn a language for the fun of it.

    If for fun, I'd go Latin! Plus, it'll make learning medical terminology easier.
     
  7. rohde88

    rohde88 Senior member

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    Chinese for legal practice, Spanish for fun. Portuno if I'm feeling drunk.

    South Florida is great.
     
  8. dtmt

    dtmt Senior member

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  9. Eason

    Eason Senior member

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    OP is going medical, a lot of dr's need to know medical terminology both in English and Spanish. I'd say do spanish.
     
  10. timotune

    timotune Senior member

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    Mandarin all the way.
     
  11. Nereis

    Nereis Senior member

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    Spanish. Knowing passable latin terms from medical school will only help you out.
     
  12. L.R.

    L.R. Senior member

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    Bumping an old thread. I plan on learning some Russian via Rosetta Stone, so I can at least know the basics. How can I improve afterward? I'll be living in Toronto, so I suppose I'm afforded some opportunity to speak it, but certainly nothing compared to a immersion experience. And immersion would be a hard to come by option, as there are few chances to work there with such basic Russian, outside of poorly paid ESL schools.
     
  13. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    In order of importance (If you live in the Americas): English, Spanish, Mandarin / Cantonese.
     
  14. L.R.

    L.R. Senior member

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    In order of importance (If you live in the Americas): English, Spanish, Mandarin / Cantonese.

    Ideally, I'll be working within Europe. I can already read basic French, so I think I'll be fluent (ish) by next year. I'd like to know at least one more major European language, and I view French and English as covering Western Europe fairly well, and perhaps Russian for East. I'd actually prefer to learn Swedish (the culture of Sweden has always interested me), but the language has a limited usefulness.
     
  15. bigbjorn

    bigbjorn Senior member

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    I'd actually prefer to learn Swedish (the culture of Sweden has always interested me), but the language has a limited usefulness.
    Yeah, as I've said before, not much use learning a language that 9m people speak, especially when 8.9m of them also speak English. BTW as a Swede, I've got to know -- what about the culture of Sweden is interesting?
     
  16. rohde88

    rohde88 Senior member

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    Yeah, as I've said before, not much use learning a language that 9m people speak, especially when 8.9m of them also speak English. BTW as a Swede, I've got to know -- what about the culture of Sweden is interesting?

    Lutefisk, lingonberries, ice racing, tall leggy blondes in saunas?

    I'm a quarter swedish heia sverige!
     
  17. Mr Pelican Pants

    Mr Pelican Pants Well-Known Member

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    As an undergrad, what is the best language to start studying right now?

    Chinese? Spanish? Japanese?

    Discuss please.


    Well, if this is your second language, you should learn the one you're most interested in. Once you master one, really understand how it works and think in it, learning another language, even from a different family, is significantly easier. (Though obviously it's not nearly as easy, after you're fluent in French, to go to Mandarin as it is to go to Italian.)

    In any case, the language you're most interested in is likely to be the one you'll progress in the fastest. Learning languages is really about learning how language systems work, and making those systems part of your own second nature. From that point you tend to get interested in languages generally, and your ability to pick up new languages improves. You learn to just "feel" your way around a language rather than thinking consciously about how to say, "my postillion has been struck by lightning" or whatever.

    BTW, don't hesitate to start a third language before you've mastered the second. If anything it will help you with both.

    On the other hand, you could just learn the language of the country you think has the hottest chicks.
     
  18. HotlantaHoward

    HotlantaHoward Senior member

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    Most useful in business sense for next 30 years:

    1) Chinese
    2) Spanish
    3) Arabic
     
  19. k9n

    k9n Senior member

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  20. chevron

    chevron Well-Known Member

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    Bumping an old thread. I plan on learning some Russian via Rosetta Stone, so I can at least know the basics. How can I improve afterward? I'll be living in Toronto, so I suppose I'm afforded some opportunity to speak it, but certainly nothing compared to a immersion experience. And immersion would be a hard to come by option, as there are few chances to work there with such basic Russian, outside of poorly paid ESL schools.

    Maybe get a cute little Russian language partner on italki.com?
     

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