knife storage

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by itsstillmatt, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. tattersall

    tattersall Senior member

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    We have a big block and keep the extras in a drawer.
     
  2. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

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    I have four knives that are absolutely gorgeous. A Shun Elite 10 in Chef's, a Shun Elite 4 inch paring, a sashimi knife, and a Japanese veg knife. All were gifts from SF members, now that I think about it. But to me, they are just tools of the trade, and not something to show off in my kitchen. Besides, I have to move mine around too much to ever stop using a rollkit anyway.

    I respect your perspective as well as the logistics your knives regularly experience. And please don't get me wrong - I am not a brand whoring show-off, knives happen to be one of the mementos I get on my trips abroad and I love the aesthetics of the form which follows the function of my knives. Hell, I bought a set of 14 inch stainless steel chopsticks with ebony handles and oxhorn bolsters which, obviously, is indulgent but I use them all the time - from flipping bacon to placing caviar on top of deviled eggs.

    Unfortunately my deba knife, not so much concerning the frequency of use.[​IMG]
     
  3. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Unfortunately my deba knife, not so much concerning the frequency of use.[​IMG]


    The technique for filleting with a deba is really interesting, and you can get super clean cuts. I find it takes me about twice as long to fillet a fish with one than with a standard technique, so I don't do it since more time means the fish gets warmer, but you should see if it works for you, since you have the knife anyway.
     
  4. CDFS

    CDFS Senior member

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    I really dislike blocks, for some reason. And I absolutely hate magnetic strips. I think they are ugly and are a poor way to hold your knives.

    So for me, it's a choice between the lesser of two evils. Even the year I spent working FOH, I still kept my knives in blade guards and knife roll.


    How so. I have one and it's very easy to storage or get a hold of my knifes.
     
  5. svd

    svd Senior member

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    Carbon steel blades are in blade guards that has a soft lining and seems to pull any lingering moisture off the blade. The rest are in a regular block like the one posted above.

    I like these but my fiance squashed the idea because she thinks we'll look like serial killers:
    [​IMG]

    http://www.benchcrafted.com/Magblok.html


    I have one of these. The key to not looking like a serial killer is to simply point the blades down. Sends a completely different message.

    My one quality knife stays in a drawer where the kids can't reach.
     
  6. davesmith

    davesmith Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    I have one of these. The key to not looking like a serial killer is to simply point the blades down. Sends a completely different message.

    My one quality knife stays in a drawer where the kids can't reach.


    i also have a magnetic wall thing it is my favorite thing in the kitchen
     
  7. braised

    braised Senior member

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    I have a "drawer of death" that has probably two dozen sharp f-ers haphazardly strewn in. The plan is to rebuild as a knife drawer, probably two levels of thin drawers with the knives resting on blocks with magnets behind them for registration as opposed to vertically in slots. I'm not for the design of that "wave" thing and dont want the knoves sitting on their edges.

    I'll fab the magnetic blocks in the shop but there is a guy in PA who has the right approach on mag strips

    http://www.japaneseknifesharpeningst...p/magrack7.htm

    [​IMG]
    He has them made locally by a knifenut and it would be easy to order a long one without holes to enable a trim carpenter to fit/cope to any wall or drawer.

    B
     
  8. KJT

    KJT Senior member

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    I have one of these. The key to not looking like a serial killer is to simply point the blades down. Sends a completely different message.

    My one quality knife stays in a drawer where the kids can't reach.


    Seems dangerous. I don't know how strong those things are, but with a hard enough bump I'd imagine the knife could fall off and I'd rather have the blade pointing up when it falls.
     
  9. HgaleK

    HgaleK Senior member

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    Seems dangerous. I don't know how strong those things are, but with a hard enough bump I'd imagine the knife could fall off and I'd rather have the blade pointing up when it falls.
    I have a magnetic strip and they're on there tight. It would take one hell of a bump to get them to shift. I'd be more worried about reaching fingers. For those who don't like having the strip displayed, you can always just put in magnetic strip on the bottom of the knife drawer. It'll keep them from getting thrown around.
     
  10. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    I built a locking (birch) plywood box that fits just inside our drawer to where it's a bitch to get out. I did up two varieties of knife storage: one was vertical slots cut into a cedar block for edge-down storage of the less-finicky knives (German knives, etc), and two angled blocks glued to the top (fixed-half part) with inset magnets to hold the more finicky (and larger) gyutous so that only the heel touches the bottom of the box.

    The construction is kind of rough owing to a tight deadline, I told myself I'd re-do it with some spare mahogany lying in the garage when I had the time, but that has yet to happen, three years later.
     
  11. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Thomas, I just want you to know, I can sharpen my knives like a Samurai now. No guiding gizmo either, just me, the knife, and a stone.

    Bonzai!!!!!!!!!!1!
     
  12. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    Excellent! How did things work out with the bird's beak parer? Side note: I'd been wanting to do up a picture-type post about sharpening that and a serrated (bread) knife, but I've had a hard time finding really dull knives. Well, other than those belonging to my mother-in-law, but she won't let me touch her knives, because Sharp Knives are Dangerous. [​IMG]
     
  13. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    The bird's beak is OK, and the diamond steel is the only thing that works even marginally, but I cannot get it nearly as sharp as I can get my regular knives using the stone.
     
  14. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    I built a locking (birch) plywood box that fits just inside our drawer to where it's a bitch to get out. I did up two varieties of knife storage: one was vertical slots cut into a cedar block for edge-down storage of the less-finicky knives (German knives, etc), and two angled blocks glued to the top (fixed-half part) with inset magnets to hold the more finicky (and larger) gyutous so that only the heel touches the bottom of the box. The construction is kind of rough owing to a tight deadline, I told myself I'd re-do it with some spare mahogany lying in the garage when I had the time, but that has yet to happen, three years later.
    I like this idea. Any pictures? @Matt: Just gentle fun. It's funny that you mention Oxbow hay, as I just bought some at the pet store today.
     
  15. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    The bird's beak is OK, and the diamond steel is the only thing that works even marginally, but I cannot get it nearly as sharp as I can get my regular knives using the stone.

    Not surprising, given the limited grit options with diamond rods. Beyond that point you're looking at (generally speaking) a leather strop with polishing compound.

    I like this idea. Any pictures?

    (...)


    I think I posted a few pics of the construction (in progress) a few years back, but wouldn't know where to start to find the pics now. I'll try to snap a few this evening. It's a really bad habit I have with projects, where I take pictures to document what I did, and then lose them.

    I made a cedar bench/chest for a cousin's daughter maybe 7-8 years ago based on a pencil sketch, and was really happy at some of the construction ideas that came to me, but damned if I documented any of it. It was really nifty, mortise-and-tenon construction into 3-inch-thick cedar corner posts, floating panels, bottom drawer. I could stand on the lid of the chest, AND in the floating bottom above the drawer. Wonder how it's holding up.
     

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