Knife Set

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kmwrestle, Mar 11, 2011.

  1. SField

    SField Senior member

    Messages:
    6,278
    Likes Received:
    23
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    you sadden me, my comment was clear, just because you dont like cutco knives doesnt mean they are bad... you are wrong
    I don't like cutco knives because they are poorly made, do not keep an edge, are not terribly sharp to begin with, are not well balanced, and feel like shit in the hand of anyone that has ever used a real knife.
     


  2. SField

    SField Senior member

    Messages:
    6,278
    Likes Received:
    23
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    you know forget it, i was trying to help this guy, good day to you

    Believe me, you weren't helping him.
     


  3. sinnedk

    sinnedk Senior member

    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    2,427
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Believe me, you weren't helping him.

    you know maybe all you do is cut vegetables all day so thats why you dont know what a good knife is... try cutting some meat
     


  4. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

    Messages:
    17,863
    Likes Received:
    3,974
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Location:
    omicron persei 8
    If I were to invest in "the one" chef's knife, looking to spend perhaps $400-$600, what would you suggest? Currently all my knives are Shun, and they work just fine, but my Chef's knife has gotten seriously abused from overuse that I'm thinking of upgrading.
    you're looking for a watanabe honyaki gyuto. but it's like 100 to 150 above your price range. his regular gyuto is prolly fine as well http://www.watanabeblade.com/english/pro/pro.htm http://zknives.com/knives/kitchen/kt...ehkgy270.shtml goddamn if i was balling i would buy one would not go with nenox. their honyaki is a stretch to call honyaki. watanabe gives you the real deal. at op. i would just go with a bunch of misono knives. if you get 4 ux10s they should be within your budget (http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/UX10Series.html) also you honestly dont need a bread knife if you have a sharp knife. even if you did need one you would not need a top quality one as the saw would cut better than the edge itself i dont understand what you need a santoku for that you cant do with a gyuto my optimal kitchen knife set would be watanabe honyaki wa-gyuto misono ux10 petty a cheap bread knife from oxo maybe a sujihiki from misono right now it's prolly going to be misono ux10 gyuto hiromoto petty which i'm pretty happy with
     


  5. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    157
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    you sadden me, my comment was clear, just because you dont like cutco knives doesnt mean they are bad... you are wrong
    And just because you don't like J&M, Florsheim, or Aldo does not mean they are bad. Like the cutco, they work. They may have some aesthetic or quality differences from a higher end pair of shoes. I'm sorry I took the sarcasm approach rather than just saying that. It just seemed ironic and a bit of an easy target b/c you had a WTB C&J shoes in your sig. You would get a very interesting reaction if you suggested to a professional chef that he should buy an $800 pair of shoes. Different people, different priorities.
     


  6. mm84321

    mm84321 Senior member

    Messages:
    3,040
    Likes Received:
    7
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2009
    Look at boutique Japanese makers like Nenox or Hattori. Or someone from the US like Kramer. I don't think it's bad to find something comfortable and sharp, and even quite beautiful if you use it every day. Although I daresay that if your Shun is showing signs of abuse, you may want to reconsider buying a great knife. They are durable but the finer the knife, the more delicate their edge, in general. My knives from 10 years ago are worn but really don't show signs of abuse. Technique, as always, is the most important thing and if your knife is shot to shit it may be a sign that you shouldn't be buying something better until you improve your use of your current knife.
    Thanks. When I first got the knife, about 2 years ago, my skills were still pretty amateur. I used the knife to cut through some lobsters and crack through the shells and ended up with some weird indentations along the blade. Since then I've taken 2 courses on knife skills and have become much more comfortable in carefully handling knives, however my chef's knife just isn't what it used to be in terms of performance (I've had it sharpened since the lobster incident, and regularly hone it). I just sort of feel like I'd like to start fresh with a new knife.
     


  7. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,384
    Likes Received:
    2,047
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    you're looking for a watanabe honyaki gyuto. but it's like 100 to 150 above your price range. his regular gyuto is prolly fine as well http://www.watanabeblade.com/english/pro/pro.htm http://zknives.com/knives/kitchen/kt...ehkgy270.shtml goddamn if i was balling i would buy one would not go with nenox. their honyaki is a stretch to call honyaki. watanabe gives you the real deal. at op. i would just go with a bunch of misono knives. if you get 4 ux10s they should be within your budget (http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/UX10Series.html) also you honestly dont need a bread knife if you have a sharp knife
    I think people have no idea how much skill it takes to keep a knife like that sharp, and to use it correctly. 99.999999% of the people, it is a total waste.
     


  8. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

    Messages:
    14,457
    Likes Received:
    4,790
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Location:
    The Temple of Jawnz
    Aren't Japanese knives weighted and balanced differently than western knives? The knife cut motion in Japanese cooking is opposite that to western technique.
     


  9. sinnedk

    sinnedk Senior member

    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    2,427
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    And just because you don't like J&M, Florsheim, or Aldo does not mean they are bad. Like the cutco, they work. They may have some aesthetic or quality differences from a higher end pair of shoes.

    I'm sorry I took the sarcasm approach rather than just saying that. It just seemed ironic and a bit of an easy target b/c you had a WTB C&J shoes in your sig.

    You would get a very interesting reaction if you suggested to a professional chef that he should buy an $800 pair of shoes. Different people, different priorities.


    well i disagree w/you about quality since its what i have in my kitchen and its great
     


  10. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    157
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    you're looking for a watanabe honyaki gyuto. but it's like 100 to 150 above your price range. his regular gyuto is prolly fine as well
    Steel looks really beautiful. I'd love to try one of those out.. I'm looking at one and I don't love the way the tang gets really narrow so there's a gap between the end of the handle and the butt end of the blade. I like to have my ring finger resting against the butt. Pic for reference since I'm probably not using good words to describe: http://www.watanabeblade.com/english...o240keyaki.jpg
     


  11. mm84321

    mm84321 Senior member

    Messages:
    3,040
    Likes Received:
    7
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2009


  12. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

    Messages:
    11,479
    Likes Received:
    778
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Thanks. When I first got the knife, about 2 years ago, my skills were still pretty amateur. I used the knife to cut through some lobsters and crack through the shells and ended up with some weird indentations along the blade. Since then I've taken 2 courses on knife skills and have become much more comfortable in carefully handling knives, however my chef's knife just isn't what it used to be in terms of performance (I've had it sharpened since the lobster incident, and regularly hone it). I just sort of feel like I'd like to start fresh with a new knife.

    Fellow Maxwell, you are the weirdest 21 year old ever. I mean that in a good way.
     


  13. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

    Messages:
    33,652
    Likes Received:
    857
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    I think people have no idea how much skill it takes to keep a knife like that sharp, and to use it correctly. 99.999999% of the people, it is a total waste.
    Yep.
    Fellow Maxwell, you are the weirdest 21 year old ever. I mean that in a good way.
    Shoulda seen me three years ago bro. Christ, three years already. I'm getting old.
     


  14. SField

    SField Senior member

    Messages:
    6,278
    Likes Received:
    23
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    you know maybe all you do is cut vegetables all day so thats why you dont know what a good knife is... try cutting some meat

    Ok so you really are just retarded.
     


  15. sinnedk

    sinnedk Senior member

    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    2,427
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by