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Kitchen Tools

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by mgm9128, Dec 29, 2011.

  1. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    +1 to this. I use the pressure cooker mostly for stocks, beans, and grains. Mine is a Kuhn-Rikon, but I'm sure that other brands work perfectly well.
     
  2. hopkins_student

    hopkins_student Senior member

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    How about the Sous Vide Supreme? It's fairly reasonably priced. Also, how about the standard sealer that they sell for $79 compared to the chamber sealer they sell for ten times that much?
     
  3. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    I don't have a chamber vacuum. I know one of the advantages of them is their ability to seal liquids, but that's easily enough accomplished with a regular suction machine. The bags are also cheaper, but you'd have to live to be like 150 to break even on the cost of the machine vs. the cost of bags. I use a Caso that I really like.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012
  4. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    ITT: FOOD NERDS
     
  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Pressure cooked stocks are tastier, and cleaner, both in clarity and in production. Other than that, and the fact that there is some useful info, Modernist Cuisine is a pretty big disappointment. I get the feeling that Myrvhold has incredible knowledge and a terrible palate.
     
  6. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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    I think the amount of energy they've spent pimping that disgusting looking striped omelet is pretty good evidence of that.
     
  7. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Myrvhold's palate is just too modernist for you to understand.

    I thought that striped omelette looked swell.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  8. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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  9. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    nah those food saver bags are expensive. You can make up the difference within a couple years if you're going with something like the vp112, which you can get for $600 bucks. You don't have to get a BIG chamber sealer.


    It's possible. I haven't cooked any of the recipes yet and have just been reading it like a regular book so far. I think the book is really interesting but I'm a huge nerd and I'm excited by the same kind of things as Myrvhold is. I think there's a lot of knowledge you can get in the book that you can't get easily in other places. Some of it is actually useful for cooking and some of it not. It's interesting to the right audience nonetheless.

    The microbiology chapter is interesting and it doesn't contribute to your ability to cook something, but it is important imo.

    I also think you know FAR more than the average or even above average home cook, and that probably makes it less valuable to you. Still, it's early days and I won't have time to really dig in to it until i come back frmo vacation.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  10. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    guess what ms. fg got mr. fg for xmas. i'll let you know. i've got a chicken carcass in the fridge just waiting. so far, i've used it to cook wheatberries and ... oatmeal (it's got a warmer feature on it, so i can put the oatmeal on when i wake up ... take the dog for a walk and have breakfast when ig et back. revolutionary.
    eta: we got a fagor electric ... my test kitchen manager did a piece a month ago testing all of them and this works great ... doubles as slow-cooker and rice cooker.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    No, the problem is the degree of masturbation and "look at me I am rich" ramblings and the fact that while the information is top notch, the recipes are not very sophisticated. Or, I should say that the recipes are sophisticated in the original sense of the word, but not very interesting as far as flavor goes. They never fail to use a complicated technique when a simple one would be better, nor fail to use a complicated technique when nothing at all is necessary. For the info on how to make a sphere or a foam or how to make your own freeze dried container for cup of noodles it is great. Srs.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  12. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Sounds like you're having a good time with it. I wonder, since flavor extraction is more efficient with a pressure cooker, would that mean that you end up using less bones to produce the same flavor of more bones done conventionally? What about making large batches? I guess you're limited by the size of the unit. I have access to free veal and chicken bones, but it's often a bit cumbersome transporting 20lb bags of the stuff. But I always like making stock in large batches so I don't have to make it so often.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  13. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Same amount of meat and bones, less time.
     
  14. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    ^^ 6qt is kinda small for stock, no?

    And although everyone agrees with matt, I'd be interested in hearing your comments too! How much of a flavor difference is there really?
     
  15. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    seems like it to me, too. but if it's faster, maybe i'll make more smaller batches. to tell the truth, i hardly ever make stock anymore. just don't make that many dishes where it's a big component.
     
  16. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I have a very large pressure cooker stock pot. Like FG I don't make a lot of stocks, but unlike him I do make a good deal of chicken stock. The pressure cooker really is good with this. No skimming either.
     
  17. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    How many quarts?
     
  18. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Six inches soft, but I am a grower.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    Isn't that part of the point of the book? Showcasing modern techniques that haven't been explained/used much/at all in other books? I don't necessarily think it's bad that they showcase the new, even when it's sometimes unnecessary. I think that as people build up their skills, they'll be able to decide how/when to use a particular technique like we're doing discussing about pressure-cooked stock vs the way described in almost every other cook book.

    I don't think it's a bad thing to see new techniques used in many different contexts, even if each course doesn't satisfy your discerning palate. There are thousands of books that discuss traditional techniques already.

    I doubt anyone will finish reading MC and do everything the MC way all the time.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  20. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Much of the information provided in Modernist Cuisine should be disregarded due to the nature of Nathan Myhrvold's less than refined palate.
     

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