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Kitchen Knives

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Manton, Sep 15, 2007.

  1. tiecollector

    tiecollector Senior member

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    On a similar note, what do you all wear while cooking? I bought a chef's jacket but it is too big and will give it to my co-worker. The jacket may look pretentious but I think it is quite useful for covering up nicer clothes if you are cooking for a dinner party, etc.

    The brand I got was Chef Revival and the fabric is pretty heavy though a little pricey at ~$40 for the basic model. I would assume the heavier the fabric the better. I see some jackets online for as low as $10. Does it matter all that much?
     
  2. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    On a similar note, what do you all wear while cooking? I bought a chef's jacket but it is too big and will give it to my co-worker. The jacket may look pretentious but I think it is quite useful for covering up nicer clothes if you are cooking for a dinner party, etc.

    The brand I got was Chef Revival and the fabric is pretty heavy though a little pricey at ~$40 for the basic model. I would assume the heavier the fabric the better. I see some jackets online for as low as $10. Does it matter all that much?


    I don't guess for that price you're getting bespoke. [​IMG]

    That said, I don't wear anything specific, unless we're grilling and then I wear my grilling apron that I received from A&M with my name embroidered on it.
     
  3. Teacher

    Teacher Senior member

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    I don't usually wear anything special, but I should. I used to have a chef's jacket, but it got so stained that I eventually tossed it. I've thought of getting another one for the very reason you state but I haven't gotten around to it.
     
  4. ccc123

    ccc123 Senior member

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    WOW - I have learned many things here, I work for Victorinox who own RH Forschner - a very good commercial grade product, I want to thank the many posters who have provided very detailed and passionate facts ideas and concepts about the many different styles of knives, brands, as well as preferences - you guys are a treasure trove of information.

    I like the summary of sharp good dull bad - I'm not here to say anything other than thanks - and hope all find what works for them.
     
  5. eg1

    eg1 Senior member

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    I like the Globals, as much for the way they look as anything else -- both my wife and I are hacks with knives anyway. Puts me in mind of a term the butchers used to insult one another with at the meat-packing plant where I worked summers many years ago: "shoemaker"! [​IMG]
     
  6. sho'nuff

    sho'nuff Senior member

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    i love our henkels made in germany set.

    i sharpen my knives all the time using the sharpening steel. not as fast ast bill the butcher though but im getting there.

    i liked the henkels so much i gave a set to my mom
     
  7. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

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    I've got:

    Wustoff Classic Santoku
    Wustoff Classic carving knife and fork
    Forschner 10" Chefs
    Forschner Bread knife
    Forschner 6" Boning knife
    Shun 4" Paring knife
    Kyocera 6" Santoku

    I love all of these knives, but I find that the Forschner have some of the best metal - they don't lose an edge that quickly, but they certainly are easier to sharpen. I can get all my knives to the same sharpness, but the German ones seem to be harder.

    I make sure to use a bamboo or wooden cutting board as well, and I try not to cut anything resting on metal or ceramics because of the dulling of the knives.
     
  8. tiecollector

    tiecollector Senior member

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    I don't usually wear anything special, but I should. I used to have a chef's jacket, but it got so stained that I eventually tossed it. I've thought of getting another one for the very reason you state but I haven't gotten around to it.
    I believe the Chef Revival one I have is a 7oz cotton/poly twill material. The cheaper ones are probably much lighter. Have you noticed any stains soaking through a lighter fabric? I got a MAC 4" santoku paring knife but I don't really like it, it is too wide for detailed work and kind of pointless to have a separate knife for chopping small things because I can do that with my larger santoku. I'm looking forward to trying out a 9" chef's knife because I'm not sure how I feel about my 6.5" santoku. It feels a bit too middle of the road for me.
     
  9. Teacher

    Teacher Senior member

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    I believe the Chef Revival one I have is a 7oz cotton/poly twill material. The cheaper ones are probably much lighter. Have you noticed any stains soaking through a lighter fabric?


    I don't know how thick mine was, but it wasy way heavier than 7 ounces. I never had any problems with things soaking through, even in restaurant kitchens.
     
  10. rolex

    rolex Senior member

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    Using Globals.
     
  11. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    Actually, just pulled the trigger on a Togiharu Gyutou. I was looking at the Tojiro but the Togiharu seemed to be more highly recommended and the price was right. Korin has a 15% off sale on their knives (no affiliation). I'll have more to post once it comes in and I get to using it.
     
  12. tiecollector

    tiecollector Senior member

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    So, I've been using my MAC santoku for the past two weeks and it is a good knife, very sharp. My friend who just got into cooking with me got a MAC chef's knife and I have to say I like the chef's knife much more than the santoku.

    I tried out the Messermeister ME chef's knife at the store and the rocking action on it was quite nice. I'm thinking about picking up an 8" version, however, I do find something endearing about an old school K-Sabatier Au Carbone as well, though. I'm leaning towards the K-Sabatier, even though it requires a bit more maintenance keeping it dry and all that.

    Would anyone strongly advise not getting the K-Sabatier?
     
  13. amerikajinda

    amerikajinda Senior member

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  14. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    Actually, just pulled the trigger on a Togiharu Gyutou. I was looking at the Tojiro but the Togiharu seemed to be more highly recommended and the price was right. Korin has a 15% off sale on their knives (no affiliation). I'll have more to post once it comes in and I get to using it.
    I think the relatively small price premium of Togiharu Molybdenum or Inox lines over Tojiro DP is worth it, if only for better fit and finish.
    I'm looking at this Ittosai Shiro-ko Honyaki Gyutou: http://www.korin.com/models.php?cat=...nyaki%20Gyutou
    That's an extraordinary knife, having a 300mm blade, non-stain resistant steel and being rather pricey. At that price point you have a bunch of choices, including customs, as you are probably aware. Do you own other japanese knives?
     
  15. amerikajinda

    amerikajinda Senior member

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    That's an extraordinary knife, having a 300mm blade, non-stain resistant steel and being rather pricey. At that price point you have a bunch of choices, including customs, as you are probably aware. Do you own other japanese knives?
    I don't currently own any Japanese knives -- what I've been using for the past few years is a made in China set that I bought at Ikea... but now that I'm getting more into cooking, I know I have to step it up a bit, and my reasoning is that I might as well get something that I can grow into as my kitchen skills increase... is this a good start? I'd shy away from custom, as I have no idea what I want/need...
     
  16. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    is this a good start?
    No. Unless you're running your own Michelin-starred kitchen, why would you buy one of these to start? A set of decent Henckels or Wusthof would take care of 99% of your needs--for less $$$ this single knife. Seriously, who needs a $700 chef's knife?
     
  17. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    I don't currently own any Japanese knives -- what I've been using for the past few years is a made in China set that I bought at Ikea... but now that I'm getting more into cooking, I know I have to step it up a bit, and my reasoning is that I might as well get something that I can grow into as my kitchen skills increase... is this a good start? I'd shy away from custom, as I have no idea what I want/need...

    Jinda, my first knives - and current mainstays - are Victorinox/Forschners. I highly recommend them for their price and versatility. I've also got a couple of Wusthofs, but no chef's knife which is my primary knife. Not sure I'd use a Wusthof more than the Forschner. And at $25, nothing beats a Forschner.

    Funny enough, Dmax - the Tojiro DP and The Togiharu Moly were only a few cents' different. Not even a dollar, so I pulled the trigger on the Togiharu and hoped for the best. I went for the 240 mm and that will be my biggest knife in the kitchen. I am slightly worried since the Tojiro is a 50/50 bevel while the Togiharu is a 70/30 bevel, but then again it's not like I switch hands with the knife.
     
  18. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    C'mon guys, this is Jinda afterall -- it has to be Pure Asian Steel for him.
     
  19. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    I don't currently own any Japanese knives -- what I've been using for the past few years is a made in China set that I bought at Ikea... but now that I'm getting more into cooking, I know I have to step it up a bit, and my reasoning is that I might as well get something that I can grow into as my kitchen skills increase... is this a good start? I'd shy away from custom, as I have no idea what I want/need...
    Price aside, I would recommend against your choice for a couple of other reasons. 300mm is a really large chef's knife. Most European type chef's knife have an 8" blade (which is roughly 200mm). Most people are used to using an 8" chef's knife so a good step up would be 210mm or 240mm. Some knife enthusiasts certainly own 300mm chef's knives but I can assure you they bought several smaller sized knives first. You would also need a special place to store the knife, as most knife blocks would not accommodate a knife with a blade larger than 240mm. You would also need a large cutting surface made from proper material like polyethylene or wood. Rule of thumb is that your chef's knife should fit diagonally across your cutting surface in order to be used comfortably. The Ittosai Honyaki Guyto appears to be made from Hitachi white label steel (shiro-ko) which is not stain resistant. The steel will most likely discolor shortly after you begin to use it. This will not affect performance of the knife, only the appearance, but non-stain resistant steel will require you to wash and dry the knife right after cutting acidic foods to prevent corrosion and rust. I would recommend a knife similar to the Togiharu Molybdenum 240mm Guyto Thomas just got as an ideal first Japanese chef's knife. It is stain resistant, the size is substantial but not overwhelming and the price is right. There may be a difference in performance but you need to have a lot of experience with other knives to fully take advantage of it and provide the knife with the proper maintenance.
     
  20. speedster.8

    speedster.8 Senior member

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    My main issue with base/regular knives dreizach etc. are the "guards" at the end of the blade, where it meets the handle. If you wish to hoon the knife and maintain a propper edge throughout the life. [​IMG] I did that for my first couple of knifes, something im regertting to this day.
     

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