1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Justify buying a pair of EGs

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by zjpj83, Nov 12, 2004.

  1. xlhell

    xlhell Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Mission, SF
    One of my favorite clothing quotes:

    "The quality is remembered long after the price is forgotten."

    Go for it.
     
  2. shqiptar

    shqiptar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    81
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2004
    Location:
    Toronto
    It's difficult to say a definite yes or no. The kind of job usually determines the kind of clothes you'll wear. If you have an office job, then wearing a suit and dress shoes is almost a must (almost is for the offices that allow casual clothing). If you have a high paying office job, and a lot of power, then buying expensive suits and shoes is justifiable in the eyes of the collective psyche. Since childhood, unconsciously, we have been conditioned to associate succesful/rich/powerful people with expensive clothes, big houses, expensive cars, and the attention that goes to them. For some reason, if you have modest means, but spend a lot of money on expensive clothes, or shoes people tend to label you as phoney, trying too hard, snob, etc. No, matter what members of the forum might say, it's important to balance our social status with the appearance. I, personally, can't see myself spending $500 on shoes right now. First, I don't have a job where wearing expensive suits, shoes, accessories, etc will help me be more effective at what I do. Second, without a strong financial base I can't see myself justifying the purchase of such expensive shoes. When I make 70-80 grand a year, maybe I'll be willing to spend $500 on a pair of shoes. Maybe. There is a voice, deep there, telling me that an expensive pair of shoes will help me make a big impression at various formal occasions. Well, so far I haven't had many formal occasions to justify the purchasing of such shoes. If that changes, maybe I'll consider it. Again, maybe.
     
  3. My View

    My View Senior member

    Messages:
    107
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Location:
    Singapore
    For me, it's not easy to part with $500 for a pair of EG.  But when I wear it, the comfort - I am fortunate in that its 8.5/9 F202 fits me almost like a glove - and the beauty of it sometimes make me wonder why on earth do I want to get any shoes other than EG.

    (But I do come to my senses eventually so I still wear my other lesser shoes: Weston, Lobb, J&M, Alden, Sebago and I still dream of trying Vass, Grenson Masterpieces and the countless gorgeous Italian shoes if they make them in wide fittings that is.)

    So as many forum members have said before me, it really depends on your value system.  In mine, I will continue to buy EGs even though they cost more than many alternatives out there.
     
  4. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    33,468
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    I'll agree with this, um, toned down and altered version of my statement. About paying for the cleaning though, unless the damage was caused by a malicious or reckless act, I think that a real gentleman would not insist that the waitress pay for the cleaning (god knows they are not making much anyway.) In any case, at a good restaurant, the management will probably insist on reimbursing you. If you're not at a good restaurant, chalk it up to experience.
     
  5. xlhell

    xlhell Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Mission, SF
    "No, matter what members of the forum might say, it's important to balance our social status with the appearance."

    Sorry but I don't agree with this. I make a modest amount of money, but without a wife or kids I have a bit more disposable income than a family man who makes twice what I do. I like the way I feel when I'm wearing nice quality clothes but as a profession I'm close to being just a common laborer. If people want to call me a poser then that's their problem; the compliments and affirmations from strangers is enough to tell me that the money I spend on good quality clothes is money well spent.
    It's all about how the clothes makes YOU feel.

    I recently spent $600 on a little brass model railroad locomotive. Some might think that excessive but the joy I get out of watching my little Shay wind its way around a plaster mountain is well worth it to me.
    Everybody had their priorities on how they spend their money; if expensive clothing makes you feel good then do it.

    As Reggie Jackson said in an Old VW commercial "the only person I need to impress is me."
     
  6. Bic Pentameter

    Bic Pentameter Senior member

    Messages:
    796
    Joined:
    May 1, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle


    ZJ

    I don't know if I would agree that shoes are necessarily "smaller."  I order ready to wear suits, but am harder on them than I am on my ready to wear shoes.  I sit on gum at the pigsty called a university where I take night classes.  At the gym, I take my suit off and hang it on a flimsy wire hanger, then slam the sleeve in the latch on the locker.  I wear out the crotch of my trousers, and (someone's pet peeve from another thread) hang my briefcase on my shoulder from the shoulderstrap.

    Of course, I step in things while wearing my shoes, get caught in the rain, and occasionally scratch the toes, but I seem to cause comparatively more damage to my suits than I do to my shoes.  I can't imagine buying a $2,000 suit, but I can (almost) imagine buying a $2,000 pair of shoes.

    Also, on any given day, I can wear a suit or shirt that is a little too small or too large. Granted, I will look silly, and may be a bit embarrassed  (Today I am wearing a shirt I bought during my student days that has a touch of polyester in it. I am itchy, hot and not too comfortable), but no long term phsical damage will be done. I cannot walk half a block in shoes that are too tight or two sizes too big.

    Of course, just because a shoe is expensive does not necessarily mean that it will be the most comfortable on the market for a particular foot.

    Also, I note that you suggest that a custom suit feels and looks many multiples better than a standard old RTW mediocre suit.  Perhaps then a better shoe comparison would be a bespoke pair of EG shoes vs. $200 Grensons.

    I am considering bespoke EG's, but cannot imagine whether the added cost will be worth the benefit.  

    Bic
     
  7. Horace

    Horace Senior member

    Messages:
    1,447
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    I'd dissent from this view and agree instead with another message above. Â That is, the richest people I know dress in nondescript fashion and appear as if they'd been asleep in the hedges for the night. Â (And on occasion, I know this to be true.). I'd also agree with substance of LA Guy's msg: Â if you've got to worry about it (at least too much), you probably shouldn't buy it.
     
  8. marc37

    marc37 Senior member

    Messages:
    986
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2004
    Location:
    VICTORIA AUSTRALIA.
    For me, not only is it a lot of money, by any standard, but it's also a lot... smaller. Â Do you know what I mean? Â I mean, a suit that costs thousands of dollars makes sense (to me) because it pretty much covers your whole body. Â It is the major part of the outfit. Â Shoes stick out a few inches beyond your trouser. Â You feel a suit on your whole body. Â You feel shoes on a little part of your body. Â To me, a custom suit feels and looks many multiples better than a standard old RTW mediocre suit. Â It's worth that much more. Â I like shoes a lot, but are $500 EGs worth 2-3 times more than, says $200 Grensons? Â I'm sure some of you will take issue with my saying that shoes are a minor part of the outfit. Â I'm not sure that's exactly what I mean. Â but I really do see the value in an ultra expensive suit, whereas I have trouble seeing the value in ultra expensive shoes. Don't know if that makes sense. Looking forward to your responses.
    ZJ I don't know if I would agree that shoes are necessarily "smaller." Â I order ready to wear suits, but am harder on them than I am on my ready to wear shoes. Â I sit on gum at the pigsty called a university where night classes are held. Â At the gym, I take my suit off and hang it on a flimsy wire hanger, then slam the sleeve in the latch on the locker. Â I wear out the crotch of my trousers, and (someone's pet peeve from another thread) carry my briefcase by the shoulderstrap. Of course, I step in things while wearing my shoes, get caught in the rain and occasionally scratch the toes, but I seem to cause more comparative damage to my suits than I do to my shoes. Â I can't imagine buying a $2,000 suit, but I can (almost) imagine buying a $2,000 pair of shoes. Also, on any given day, I can wear a suit or shirt that is a little too small or too large. Granted, I will look silly, and may be a bit embarrassed, Â (Today I am wearing a shirt I bought during my student days that has a touch of polyester in it. I am itchy, hot and not too comfortable), but no long term phsical damage will be done. I cannot walk half a block in shoes that are too tight. Of course, just because a shoe is expensive does not necessarily mean that it will be the most comfortable. Also, I note that you suggest that a custom suit feels and looks many multiples better than a standard old RTW mediocre suit. Â It's worth that much more. Â Perhaps then a better shoe comparison would be a bespoke pair of EG shoes vs. $200 Grensons. I am considering bespoke EG's but cannot imagine whether the added cost will be worth the benefit. Â Bic
    Well said Bic. l have no problem in falking out $2,000 for a pair of shoes. But l find it hard to falk out over $3,500 for a suit. Of course E.G wouldn't be 3 times better than $200 Grensons. lt is more about buying the best shoes for your feet. l wouldn't even have a problem falking out $5,000 Aust for a pair of Edward Greens be-spoke. (Parting with $8,000 for a pair of Lobbs would be streching it though). l love to spoil my feet. Since you are on them everyday, spoil them with expensive shoos.
     
  9. Kaga

    Kaga Senior member

    Messages:
    382
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Location:
    KS Prefecture
    Have you ever spent $2000 on a pair of shoes? You talk all the time about your shoe collection, your clogs, and your outlandish boots, but for a self-professed "shoo" [sic] aficionado, you don't seem to have much in the way of actual quality shoe experience.
     
  10. ROT

    ROT Senior member

    Messages:
    121
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2004
    Location:
    Richmond, Virginia USA
    I remember a quote from a movie or something:

    "Food, shoes or sex...... money is no object."

    If you're going to wear them for years, they wind up costing pennies a day (and feel better with each wearing.)
     
  11. Mark Seitelman

    Mark Seitelman Senior member

    Messages:
    812
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Location:
    New York City
    [​IMG] Mr. Will mentioned that the Edward Green shop puts shoes on sale in January and July. Have any of you purchased them in this manner? Does one rely on past catalogues? BTW, when Bergdorf discontinued carrying Greens I was able to get some for 1/2 price. I did the same at the Oxxford shop. I trust that as a public service that if any of this esteemed company know of a Green sale you shall let your brothers know. Thanks. [​IMG]
     
  12. TimelessRider

    TimelessRider Senior member

    Messages:
    566
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2003
    Location:
    NJ, USA
    Yes. Bengal-stripe was generous enough to inform the forum a week or so prior to the last sale, and I immediately shot off an email to Edward Green requesting all shoes in my size that would be availble during the sale. I received a response with the list containg 7 or 8 pairs, to which I replied with which one I wanted, and included my credit card info. They reserved the pair for me and shoes shipped at the end of the sale. They typically have stock catalogue items but it's conceivable they may unclaimed special orders as well. If you do not recognize a model name, they have always been helpful in providing sketches and other pertinent information.
     
  13. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    33,468
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    Quite true. I know rich people who don't at all care about their appearance, and are quite happy walking around in polo shirts, khakis and sneakers all day (and these are not your thrifty "millionaire next door" types - they could shell out full retail on bespoke whatever and not bat an eye - but they would) and I know starving artists that forego sufficient food on a regular basis to wear Borrelli shirts. I also know examples of the converse of these cases. Let's just say that money and dress are not particularly well correlated except in what I consider exceptionally shallow company - I'm talking mostly about Wall Street salarymen and their British counterparts, who, despite earning well into six figures, are ultimately only just cogs in the wheel.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by