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John Lobb Paris Bespoke

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by longhorns74, Sep 7, 2014.

  1. longhorns74

    longhorns74 New Member

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    Anyone know the fee for first time bespoke to John Lobb Paris, not including the desired shoe
     
  2. Griffyndor

    Griffyndor Senior member

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    Right around $8000 all in if you are in NYC.
     
  3. marcodalondra

    marcodalondra Senior member

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    I do not want to start a new thread, however I came across these pictures today of a bespoke fitting at John Lobb Paris.

    Do anyone that know more care to comment on the practice of cutting off part of the shoe???

    @DWFII???
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2014
  4. Griffyndor

    Griffyndor Senior member

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    Lobb Paris does that as does G&G. They are trying to get a better view of where various parts of your foot hit in order to get a better fit. At both Lobb and G&G, my shoes where hacked up pretty good. The trial shoe is leather and the same model as your bespoke shoe and has a heel attached.
     
  5. marcodalondra

    marcodalondra Senior member

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    Thanks, I guess that, but if they remove the part all together, they have a less refernce on the exact points that could have been simply indicated by marks..., at least that is how I immagine it.
     
  6. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    It's not only these two firms (G&G has taken up that method quite recently) but also a number of Japanese firms do fittings that way.

    Here is a photo essay showing over some 100 photographs, JLP's method of fitting:

    http://openers.jp/fashion/fashion_special/photo_tokyo_elements10.html


    It can be argued, whether this procedure makes a significant contribution to the fit or is just a bit of show business. (Particular as the photographs I have seen, showed in every case quite a roomy pair of trial shoes.
     
  7. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    If a maker uses a pedograph to acquire a footprint (or some similar device/method) it may have less importance than if they just rely on measurements and a tracing of the foot.

    Cutting away portions of the shoe allows the maker to examine how the foot fits vis-a-vis the insole in the heel seat, for instance. Or the across the treadline. Or whether the medial ball joint is where it is supposed to be.

    If the maker does use a pedograph it is somewhat easier simply because the ink footprint can be used as a rough template for the insole. And then the girths and the stick pretty much determine everything else.

    --
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2014
  8. marcodalondra

    marcodalondra Senior member

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  9. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    You're welcome...:fonz:
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2014
  10. marcodalondra

    marcodalondra Senior member

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  11. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    G&G does not always cut shoes open.

    For my fitting done last October, my trial shoes were not cut open.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2014
  12. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Bottom line is that it doesn't matter, really, how the maker determines if you've got a got fit or not...as long as they're mindful of the need to meet certain criteria and as long as you're happy with the fit.

    I admire the makers that cut the shoe open. I think it's conscientious and analytical. I don't cut the shoe open.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2014
  13. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Cutting the shoes open does offer a rare glimpse of how the shoes fit visually inside. The effectiveness of which can be debated as last adjustments is not immediate and can be lost in translation/recording.

    I personally much prefer an actual mock-up shoes instead of the old semi-finished shoes without outsoles and with mock heels.
     
  14. Griffyndor

    Griffyndor Senior member

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    No idea why you are quoting me. "Always" doesn't appear in my post and I haven't implied that that always did it. They did it to my shoes. I assume yours didn't need it.
     
  15. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Dont know if that practice is implemented across the board. Dean didn't cut my shoes open.

    I think cutting shoes open is a good practice; it offer both the client and the fitter a glimpse of the internals similar to how hardware ODMs provide 3D CAD models for clients to verify the internals before prototyping or production run.
     
  16. VRaivio

    VRaivio Senior member

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    Prices for "luxury" clothing have risen greatly since the 1990s. I came across this price list from 2001 for John Lobb Paris bespoke shoes and had a look at historical currency rates. Apparently the first pair was around 19 000 francs or 2900 euros eleven years ago.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/_RJ9i0Lcax/
     
  17. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    That' pretty much in line with UK prices.

    I have an article from the 'Financial Times' in front of me. I'm not absolutely certain about the date, but presumably around 1997.

    The following prices are listed for bespoke shoes: John Lobb (SJ) £1490 *** Foster & Son £1110 *** New & Lingwood £1050 *** Cleverley £1000 *** Jason Amesbury £1000.

    Ready-to-wear shoes: John Lobb £385 - £420 *** Edward Green £365 - £425 *** Cleverley £225 -265 *** Church's £160 - 275 *** Crockett & Jones £180 - £250 *** Tricker's £195 - £210

    In the last 18 or so years, ready-to-wear has increased to about double, but bespoke has increased to almost triple.

    Also interesting to see that John Lobb (Paris) has different prices for different designs, while the West-End firms charge the same price for every design, although some uppers (those with lots of perforations and/or lots of hand stitching) are more expensive to produce than other (more plain) designs.
     
  18. VRaivio

    VRaivio Senior member

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    ...and then there's inflation and risen wages to calculate as well. Perhaps you have some articles about the "average" monthly UK wage from the end '90s to quote? I'm wondering if these shoes were much cheaper in the nineties compared to prices and wages these days.
     

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