Jobs in China.

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Jokerman, Jun 16, 2012.

  1. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    That's what I was thinking, because if it's a teaching position, you need a minimum of a bachelor degree and an appropriate teaching qualification now, in order to get a Z work visa for teaching in China. Although certificates and diplomas can easily be forged and/or the appropriate bribes made.

    BTW I am legit myself, but I do know some people that are teaching with phony documents.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2012
  2. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    OK just curious, doesn't sound like anyone I know.
     
  3. rokr32

    rokr32 Active Member

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    this is spot on. I have a friend who is currently teaching there and he said the exact same thing. For him, he wanted a change in his life and decided to move to China and said that he was basically an entertainer and not much effort was required for him to do his job. Luckily, he saw there was no future for him there, had his fun, and will be coming back soon.

    I remember when I visited China in December i could never imagine myself living there... People are super rude, the pollution is horrible, living conditions for the most part are bad.... But to each their own, right?
     
  4. dtmt

    dtmt Senior member

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    And I've never known the Chinese to be dishonest about their products.
     
  5. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    There's even less future in a dole queue, I wont be back in a hurry.


    They're not rude in Xilinhot, some of the nicest and friendliest people I know. They can certainly be rude in Beijing though, even standing in line is a completely alien concept to them. They can be animals there. Living conditions can widely vary wherever you are, I've had shit living conditions in the UK before now. No pollution in Xilin Gol League either, the air is clean and the sky is blue. :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2012
  6. rokr32

    rokr32 Active Member

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    He was able to secure a job through one of his father's friends and it seems like he'll be making decent money...

    And I agree, not all Chinese people are rude, as we met several super friendly people who went out of their way to help us. However, Beijing is the complete opposite. It seemed to me as though the ones from Shanghai were more friendly... but I'm not sure because I was only there for a couple of weeks.

    As a matter of fact, one of my parents' closest friends son moved to China 4-5 years ago and is absolutely loving it. From what he says, once you get to know the people, they're nice and make you feel like family (he got himself a chinese girlfriend). He's not living in Shanghai, Beijing or Guangzhou, so I don't know how his experience would differ had he been living in one of those places.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2012
  7. curzon

    curzon Senior member

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    I'm interesting a high paying job where I booze and schmooze with Chinese billionaires. Preferably those who won't later poison me. I think there's an opening presently if Mrs. Gu has learnt her lesson. Do you think speaking Chinese will help me keep my life?
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2012
  8. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    Beijing and Beijingers can be just horrible, I think what Eason posted about it earlier is very much true. Rather surprised he apparently lasted two years there. But then myself. I've found Hong Kong not to be a friendly place either, seems like someone always trying to swindle you.

    In Xilinhot, Inner Mongolia on the other hand, I can literally leave my front door unlocked and my windows wide open and still feel totally safe. Probably because it's such a small and quite remote city, many people know each other, and almost everyone knows my name and who I am now. Xilinhot is certainly not a poor city, unlike some. The state middle school I work in has facilities that many UK schools can only dream of. It's probably down to very favourable government spending in this region.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2012
  9. Hampton

    Hampton Senior member

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    Well I have worked in finance for 8 months in Beijing (long time ago) Do as you would do in US, apply online before you go there. I don't know about schools but when I was there they even paid my flight ticket :) What kind of job do you want and what education do you have?

    If I were you, stay in US.
     
  10. graphite

    graphite Senior member

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    i am still reading through this thread but..

    i am in Hangzhou right now. i concur with statements the likes of:

    "I feel that there has to be something wrong with somebody for them to like living in China."



    YMMV depending on the locations and circumstances of your work in China. it's competitive though, I don't think an american or whatever can just waltz in and immediately pick up status. my mandarin sucks and i am barely getting by doing normal things. I can't comment on the sexpats or any of the other creepers b/c i dunno.

    But i miss the USA :-(





    PS i have a legal business visa.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2012
  11. Eason

    Eason Bicurious Racist

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    Hang zhou is relatively nice though, enjoy your stay.
     
  12. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    Hangzhou is actually quite nice, certainly much better than Beijing IMO. Spent a year there in the Xiaoshan district. Prefer Inner Mongolia though.


    Business F visas are relatively easy to obtain, either the company you're doing business with arranges it or you go to a visa agency. Work Z visas can be much harder to get, depending on the kind of work you're doing, because there can be medicals, PSB interviews and other bureaucracy you have to go through.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2012
  13. graphite

    graphite Senior member

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    Yes hangzhou is pretty good. I'm really not complaining. It's the only city that I've experienced in China so I don't have anything to go by. I can tell it's a significantly wealthier region judging by the number of Porsches, BMW, VW, and Land Rovers I'm seeing.

    Also +1 on the F visa -- the company wrote me a nice letter when I applied and things went through completely smoothly. I dunno anything about the Z one, i'll take your word for it that's its much more difficult. Maybe in a year when I graduate I'll have to fight that battle.


    This is a good thread though. I wish I'd stumbled upon it before I got here.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2012
  14. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    Oh yeh, Hangzhou is quite affluent. LOL Although I'm staying in Inner Mongolia now for the forseeable future, because I see so much development and opportunity here. Xilinhot where I'm based is certainly not poor, has more than it's fair share of BMWs, Mercs, Porsches and Land Rovers, mostly with Beijing license plates, because that's where they buy them.


    I think they work on the principle of, can a Chinese national do the work that a foreigner is doing? After all there's a heck of a lot of people in China, who might be looking for employment. My employer arranged my Z visa, but I had to do the medicals, interviews, documentation, form filling, etc. I'm sure Z visas can be bought with the appropriate bribe, but if one is caught it means probable deportation.....or worse.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2012
  15. Bagel

    Bagel New Member

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    I spent 2 years in China after graduating from college in 2009 and thoroughly enjoyed living there. There are a lot of things to enjoy about China other than its facilitation of alcoholism and lechery. It seems a lot of people don't like China or Chinese people though (it's all a matter of opinion). The problem is that while the people who don't like China but don't have major character flaws just leave China, the people who hate China but love booze/prostitutes/laziness all stick around because there is nowhere else better to pursue their habits.

    So if you like China and want to live there, but you also want to have a social life, you have to choose between fully assimilating into Chinese culture or hanging out with transients and bums who have no Chinese friends and speak little Chinese. There doesn't seem to be much in between. Assimilating is kind of a bitch, in that you have to marry someone.

    I have friends in Shanghai and Beijing who claim it's better there--that there are more and more young professional foreigners who actually bother to learn Chinese and even Chinese people who socialize outside of work and family.

    Also, China is a big fucking country and not London, Hong Kong, Singapore, or Tokyo. Going there without being able to speak Mandarin will close a lot of doors. Imagine someone who didn't speak any English moving to the US. Even in New York, that would suck, and pretty much anywhere else would be boring as hell.


    P.S. Eason is right that teaching in China is useless on a resume.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2012

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