Jewelry on men...

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by javyn, Sep 23, 2006.

  1. Aureus

    Aureus Senior member

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    Watch and Masonic ring.
     


  2. kitonbrioni

    kitonbrioni Senior member

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  3. Ivan Kipling

    Ivan Kipling Senior member

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    European nobility used to wear a fair amount of rings, and possibly a bracelet since pocket watches were common in those days.
    Prince Charles still wears a signet ring, I think. Philip, as well. Frank Sinatra wore one, too. I think all the members of the Rat Pack, wore signet rings.
     


  4. Stu

    Stu Senior member

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    I don't like the term "Latin" referring only to Hispanics anyway. ALL of us raised in a western culture are really Latin; espcially Americans. What can be more "Latin" than living in a Republic?


    OK, but you know what I meant.
     


  5. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    Yeah, I don't mean to nitpick, I'm just sayin' [​IMG]
     


  6. whoopee

    whoopee Senior member

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    I do the cross on a chain sometimes, and I'm not Latin. Well, I'm white, but was raised a Catholic. I don't like the term "Latin" referring only to Hispanics anyway. ALL of us raised in a western culture are really Latin; espcially Americans. What can be more "Latin" than living in a Republic?

    Anyway, back to the topic...I'd like a carnelian ring, I think.


    Actually Latino does refer to some non-Hispanics, too. Not English-speaking Americans, because English, unlike Spanish and other romance languages, does not derive from vulgar Latin.
     


  7. Augusto86

    Augusto86 Sean Penn's Mexican love child

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  8. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    That dragon has a lot of majesty.
     


  9. johninla

    johninla Senior member

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    Less is more. Someone had to say it!
     


  10. Tck13

    Tck13 Senior member

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    I wear this ring for the impressive mark it leaves after I punch someone in the head (or when I post in the Current Events forum). [​IMG] [​IMG] Other cool rings and men's jewelry at King Baby. Only for those who are about to ROCK.
     


  11. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    I was about to remark that the imprint left by the ring would be backwards, but then realized it would be perfect for when the victim beholds his battered visage in a mirror.
     


  12. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    70 or 80% of our vocab derives from Latin.
     


  13. Stu

    Stu Senior member

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    70 or 80% of our vocab derives from Latin.

    I'm not an etmologist, but as I understand it, English is a Germanic language, where the Romance languages, i.e. Italian, French and Spanish, are considered Latin languages, hence Italians, French and Spaniards are considered Latins. At any rate my comment pertained to the fact that I grew up in Southern Indiana, but spent my whole professional career to date in Central America and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, and you are a lot mre likely to see Man Jewelry in the latter than in the former.
     


  14. epa

    epa Senior member

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    I think that English is basically a mix of Latin and Germanic languages, at least it appears to comprise two sets of vocabulary, one of Latin and one of Germanic origin. It appears to have something to do with Saxons and invading Normands. It also causes a lot of problems for those of us who have to learn the language. I think that the missing link between the way words are written and the way they are pronounced is partly due to this double origin of the vocabulary.
    In Spain, wearing a lot of jewelry is normally considered low class or gypsy style. Flashy jewelry such as thick gold chains can also be seen on some very rich people who made a lot of money doing dodgy real estate business.
     


  15. tiecollector

    tiecollector Senior member

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    What about the almight turquoise ring? I love it when burly dudes put them on their pinkies.


    PS I thought we get our latin words from when the Romans conquered England. From learning spanish, I can often guess the right spanish word by using the latin root. There are still a LOT of latin words in english. The grammar is different sometimes though with word ordering and stuff.
     


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