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Japanese Shoes: Bespoke & RTW Super Thread

nutcracker

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bengal-stripe

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Can someone enlighten me what the 'blind' here means?

No broguing. No gimping.

Actually, in English shoemaking terms (don't know about Japanese), a Blind Brogue is a faux brogue. Toe cap and heel counter are not separate pieces of leather laid-over, but solely a decorative double row of stitching with perforation in between.

We had recently (in this thread) a beautiful sample of a Japanese "Blind Brogue" (but I can't remember the shoemaker's name). So, here is a picture of EG Inverness. Look, it's actually a plain toe with added wing-tip decoration.



The shoe by Ryota Hayafuji featured here are a variation on an Austerity Brogue, where, during the last war, perforation on shoes was considered wasteful of men hours and without any practical purpose and was thus not allowed. (just as, for example, turn-ups on trouser bottoms).
 
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nutcracker

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Actually, in English shoemaking terms (don't know about Japanese), a Blind Brogue is a faux brogue. Toe cap and heel counter are not separate pieces of leather laid-over, but solely a decorative double row of stitching with perforation in between.

We had recently (in this thread) a beautiful sample of a Japanese "Blind Brogue" (but I can't remember the shoemaker's name). So, here is a picture of EG Inverness. Look, it's actually a plain toe with added wing-tip decoration.

The shoe by Ryota Hayafuji featured here are a variation on an Austerity Brogue, where, during the last war, perforation on shoes was considered wasteful of men hours and without any practical purpose and was thus not allowed. (just as, for example, turn-ups on trouser bottoms).

Fascinating! Somehow I always thought blind brogue = austerity brogue. :facepalm:


Here's another example of faux brogues / blind brogues by Shoji Kawaguchi He does indeed call them blind brogues.





I've previously posted another pair by Ryota Hayafuji which has a similar 'austerity brogue' design as the one post above. He also called them 'blind brogues.' Interesting because he is also an English trained maker.
 

chogall

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Actually, in English shoemaking terms (don't know about Japanese), a Blind Brogue is a faux brogue. Toe cap and heel counter are not separate pieces of leather laid-over, but solely a decorative double row of stitching with perforation in between.

We had recently (in this thread) a beautiful sample of a Japanese "Blind Brogue" (but I can't remember the shoemaker's name). So, here is a picture of EG Inverness. Look, it's actually a plain toe with added wing-tip decoration.



The shoe by Ryota Hayafuji featured here are a variation on an Austerity Brogue, where, during the last war, perforation on shoes was considered wasteful of men hours and without any practical purpose and was thus not allowed. (just as, for example, turn-ups on trouser bottoms).

You are right. It's whole cut with perforations. I remember a cleverley model of the same thing. But I though the technical term for that is imitation brogue.

p.s., I would love a whole cut imitation semi brogue. Maybe my next bespoke project.
 

bengal-stripe

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nutcracker

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English Guild, supplier of industrial grade leather finishes to English shoe manufacturers JLP, C&J, Churches and others... have released a collection of shoe creams for consumer use in Japan. These would be sold nationwide, alongside the ubiquitous M.Mowbray brand polishes (distributed by the same company R&D)



Bees Rich Cream: available in neutral and black (more colors to follow)
¥2100 ($21 USD)

Shoecare FANS
 

nutcracker

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Today, I walked into Berlutti's Tokyo bespoke show (at their flagship store in Aoyama), and bumped into Anthony Delos. Didn't get to talk to him (he was tending to a bespoke order), but nevertheless, a pleasant surprise.

M.Delos is currently doing his rounds across Asia, so check your local Berlutti if he happens to be in your neighborhood next :)

 

meister

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Here's another example of faux brogues / blind brogues by Shoji Kawaguchi He does indeed call them blind brogues.
Jeez that's one sleek sharp shoe.... Tarsal strapping mania.
 
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meister

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The names that are listed on my OP post are really just a portion of all the separate cordwainers active in Japan, but they are the ones who have distinguished themselves from the pool. btw Bolero is on my OP list, and he is also featured on the new issue of LAST magazine.

I suspect that it doesn't take too much other than a strong desire for a young cordwainer to open a shop.

Just to give an idea, there are about 4 or 5 large shoemaking academies/schools (typically a 2yr curriculum) in Tokyo alone that primarily teach handmade shoemaking methods. From each school, dozens of students graduate each year (the Guild academy alone has 40 or more graduates each year), and I presume every one of them aspire to make a name as a shoemaker. Some of them take their training further (via apprenticeship), and many of them go right ahead and open a shop.

Veteran shoemakers that I've talked to seem quite aware that the market is being saturated with upstart shoemakers, and they find this situation to be quite unfortunate. They know how tough it is to make a living out of making shoes, and they feel that many of them are too inexperienced and won't last a few years.

Regardless of how tough it may be for newcomers, I believe some are bound to distinguish themselves, and I'm eager to see what they can come up with!! :)

There are actually a few I'm keeping an eye on (yet to be introduced here).....

Is this why lots of themo do internships in Europe?
 

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