Japanese Shoes: Bespoke & RTW Super Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by nutcracker, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. nutcracker

    nutcracker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The Summer 2013 issue of MEN'S Precious, possibly the finest classic menswear publication in Japan, is on sale today. The theme of the issue is 'French Dandism', and there is a good amount of French shoes being featured.

    Unfortunately, no digital version is available at this time.
     


  2. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    The average sushi in Taiwan can go from poor to quite good depends on where you get it. The top place in Taiwan are not as good as Japan, the value proposition is from medium to high, assuming you go to the right place in Taiwan, it's just as good as Japan, cheaper, and serve more. At the highest end, there is no comparison between Taiwanese made Japanese cuisine and real Japanese cuisine (sushi or not). Taiwanese ones won't bother with all the details that is not necessarily food (i.e. presentation/timing of the food on your table/waiter knows when exact to deliver etc.), but makes a meal from great to amazing. You will find the average Taiwanese sashimi chef (at least old school ones) cut their portion on the generous side, sometimes almost too generous (i.e. it destroy the possibility of chewing the whole piece). That is a fault and a charm I suppose...
     


  3. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    We all have different experiences, but I think the pertinent point of your comment is "assuming you go to the right place". In Japan all you need to do is find a place that usually has a queue at lunch time. Sushi is not complicated all you need is fresh rice, the right kind of vinegar, fresh fish, and good knife skills. I don't think the vast majority of Taiwanese places can offer this, however a place that has 2 or 3 guys doing 500 to 1000 plates an hour can not help but have this. And in Japan you can get it at multiple shops near almost any relatively busy train station for about 115 to 150 yen per plate. From there to the very up market places the only real difference is in presentation, and the rarity/exclusivity of the produce. Once again my experience in Taiwan is limited but the three regular places I went to served old rice, the wrong kind of vinegar and yesterdays fish, like something you'd find in an airport convenience store. They were I recall about the same price as my local cheapo shop (which is superb). I was taken to the fancy place in Taiwan by my wife's boss's father who is very rich (owns a pharmaceutical company), he also owns a seafood restaurant so I guess he knows what he is talking about. It was quite expensive and about on par with my local cheapo place as far as the actual sushi is concerned, presentation was excellent.

    I think one of the differences is people's perception of what sushi should be, you mention "presentation/timing of the food on your table/waiter knows when exact to deliver etc.), but makes a meal from great to amazing. " I really couldn't disagree more, I don't expect an "amazing" experience when I eat sushi, for me it is almost like peasant food, and at its best when it is at its most simple, all the rest is an unneeded distraction. Again fresh rice, the right kind of vinegar, fresh fish, and good knife skills, that's all it takes. Throw in a drop of shoyu, a smidge of wasabi depending on the fish, and a cup of tea and you have perfection.

    We should ask nutcracker to butt in, probably has more experience in both countries than most.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013


  4. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    Why are you surprised the average sushi restaurant in Japan is better than the average in Taiwan? I think what I am trying to say is a value proposition (mid to high), and yea most Japanese place in Taiwan f*ed up on vinger (less so on rice, on the rice part it's more because they're lazy or cheap, not because they don't know how to do it right). Sashimi is probably a safer bet in Taiwan. The old saying in cooking that 70% is ingredients and 30% skills is always true, though even more so in this case.

    And off topic: Japanese food is one of the easiest to learn, and the same time one of the hardest to master. It's easy to make something looks like Japanese, but taste far from it. On a superficial level sashimi is really easy to learn, but certainly hard to master (killing the right fish in the right season, then slice it the right direction for different part, then slice the right proportion for the right taste, then send to customer in the right order and time so they're not conflicting etc.)

    Yea, I am sure nutcracker should have the most experience...
     


  5. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Less talk about dead fish meat. More talks about fish leather. :)

    ps, what clee said is very Taoism and Zen. Which is exactly why G&G or Corthay bespoke are not the best if the best. Or why sprezz is not sprezz when it's sprezz
     


  6. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    Can't disagree with this.
     


  7. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    speaking of which, wasn't there a stingray make up by either G&G or Corthay or some other bespoke operation. I remember seeing it on SF a long time ago and I love it (a seamless wholecut I think).
     


  8. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    G&G, probably owned by CDMoore. It's awesome because its simple. Not like all those painted shoes in inorganic lasts.
     


  9. onepiece22

    onepiece22 Member

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    I remember that thread I think it was Riccardo Bestetti....nvm found the thread: http://www.styleforum.net/t/251332/riccardo-bestetti-bespoke-projects
     


  10. mimo

    mimo Pernicious Enabler

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    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013


  11. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    Nutcracker's stingray is hard to pair if you ask me, I much prefer the other one color wise, black washed out the nice texture on a stingray. I can't say I like the sharkskin in the other example though.
     


  12. onepiece22

    onepiece22 Member

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    Any info on the black stingray wholecut?
     


  13. mimo

    mimo Pernicious Enabler

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    Clee, the stingray on the Bestetti shoe looks like it's sanded, whereas the G&G one is still fully "pimpled". I think that's what makes them look so different. I personally dislike the Deco last as too long and pointy, but I do like both textures equally I think; hard to choose between the more subtle Bestetti, and saying "fuck subtle, it's stingray!" with the G&G!
     


  14. nutcracker

    nutcracker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Geez you were up late last night!

    Talking 'bout kaiten(spinning)-sushis...... I remember back in the days (maybe 2 decades ago) when those cheep sushis (¥100) were notorious for containing parasites (that apparently swim up to your eyeballs?). The quality of cheap sushis has gone up drastically over the years due to popularity and demand (probably thanks to the deflation)

    The very best sushi joints in Taiwan ($100 USD+) are usually manned by Japanese chefs (usually trained at some reputable ones in Japan), and use catches shipped overnight from Japan. They really try to go for that authentic look..
    However, most Japanese joints in Taiwan are.....well, quite localised in taste and presentation. In Taiwan, the perennial favourite at almost any high end Japanese restaurant is a lobster with drizzled cheese......I've never seen that in Japan, but they don't taste bad.

    Sorry I'm not really a sushi kinda guy...... but Taiwanese cuisine is quite awesome aren't they? :)



    While you won't find much sashimi-grade fishes in local markets in Taipei, a short drive to a port (like in Yilan's Suao Harbour) can get you some really high grade chunks of tuna for a fraction of the price you pay in Japan.

    For high-end sushi joints (in Japan), I think you also pay $$$ for the experience of having the master personally prepare/direct a meal right in front of you. The experience will improve as you develop a relationship with the chef and him understanding your taste and preference.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013


  15. nutcracker

    nutcracker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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