Japanese Shoes: Bespoke & RTW Super Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by nutcracker, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. BespokeMakers

    BespokeMakers Senior member

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    Spigola Spectator,made from Calf and Hippopotamus.
    like vintage...
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    Vintage Esquire Magazine
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2013


  2. mimo

    mimo Pernicious Enabler

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    ^^ Things like that make me want to dance and sing. Thank you. :)
     


  3. nutcracker

    nutcracker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Outstanding. Love that double line Norvegese
     


  4. Ilovelobbs

    Ilovelobbs Senior member

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    ^ Agree.... Must be my favourite Friday post...
     


  5. nutcracker

    nutcracker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Visit to Edoya, Nihonbashi, Tokyo

    Edoya, manufacturer of exquisite brushes, is located at the tradition-rich Nihonbashi. Founded in 1718, they're currently operated by the 13th generation owner from the same family. Long considered as Japan's premier brush maker, much of their work are done in-house by hand under severe QC. While their repertoire includes over 3000 kinds of brushes, their clothes brushes and shoe brushes have gained much attention in recent time as more people are willing to invest in nicer suits and shoes.

    Edoya hand-threaded shoe brushes were first sold over 20 years ago (mainly for pro use), but have gained immense popularity among shoe aficionados in recent years. Top repair shops and shoe shiners such as Ball Works and Brift H swear by the Edoya Brushes, and they both sell their own custom versions (using different wood/stain etc...).

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    Built in 1926, the wooden structure (with concrete facade) is full of retro-charm.

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    Brushes galore....from kitchen brushes to tooth brushes and back scratchers.....

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    The ceiling is quite a sight. In the back: Mr.Toda, the charming sales manager.

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    Handmade clothes brushes and shoe brushes. The suede brush in the front is a hidden gem.

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    Oval shoe brushes: horse mane hair (dusting), goat hair (final polish), short horse hair (polish), and pig bristle (polish)
    The stocky dauber above are available in bristle and horsehair.

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    Rectangular shoe brushes are smaller but are surprisingly comfortable. They are slightly curved/bowed.

    Edoya shoe brushes are ¥5040 yen ($50), and suede brushes are ¥3150 ($31) direct from Edoya. However, they are so popular that their monthly re-stocks are usually sold out in few days.

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    Mr.Fukuhara: Always there to help. Thank you!
     


  6. wqvong

    wqvong Senior member

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    Can you do a proxy for the goat hair brushes?

    Thanks,
     


  7. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    WTB Edoya brushes as well. Saw on Men's Ex that Edoya brushes density is much higher that what I have access to here. Do they have hard bristle brshes as well?
     


  8. FlyingMonkey

    FlyingMonkey Senior member

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    Really, really not a fan of exotics, especially from species that are in decline. It's just unecessary.
     


  9. wqvong

    wqvong Senior member

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    Yes they do. They have one with white hair horse that is harder bristles than the goat hair.
     


  10. VRaivio

    VRaivio Senior member

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    ...well, now, here I sit, thinking that I've really seen it all, and then Spigola ups the ante. Gorgeous example of man's victory over leather.
     


  11. nutcracker

    nutcracker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Visit to Marquess, Tokyo

    Had an opportunity to visit Marquess (Shoji and Yuriko Kawaguchi)'s atelier last weekend.

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    These are as Classic and British as you can get in Japan: Simple lines and impeccable craftmanship. Or is it the impeccable craftmanship that brings out the simple lines?

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    Kawaguchi is very keen to source the very best (top tier) leather he can get hold of, directly from Europe. Marquess shoes are also noticably free of fancy finishing and antiquing. He prefers the quality of the leather to speak for itself, and age gracefully over time...just like the old English way.....

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    Classic Proportions: (from the Left) Marquess Square, Marquess Round, Marquess Chisel. Would look best in classically cut trousers.

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    The country Oxford in the Classic Round last (right) is quite stunning. You don't often see an Ocher calf finished to such smoothness.

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    Marquess trial shoes. This pair has been worn for 2 months. I am inclined to believe that take home shoes (for extended test period) is among the strengths of Japanese Bespoke.

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    Kawaguchi's prized collection of old English shoes

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    VIntage Henry Maxwell and Tuczek

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    Shoji Kawaguchi in his work garb

    Many thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Kawaguchi for their incredible hospitality!
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2013


  12. TehBunny

    TehBunny Senior member

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    Marquess are my absolute favorites from what I've been seeing on this thread and his philosophy is just the way I like my shoes! If I where to ever go bespoke in Japan it would definitely be with these guys.
    Also those vintage shoes are absolute HNNNNG!
     


  13. clee1982

    clee1982 Senior member

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    dumb question, why does the cap on cap toe looks slanted, I think I have read it somewhere, but forgot the real reason...
     


  14. nutcracker

    nutcracker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'm not all that familiar with the benefit of a more contoured or 'twisted' last, but it could be a way to put the center of gravity off centered towards the big-toe ball (to support a more natural way of walking)? I also heard elsewhere that it helps reduce creases on the vamp :) Please correct me if I'm wrong

    This Marquess sample shoe was on a soft surface (couch), so you can see how the contoured shape help put the center of gravity off-centered.
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    Last edited: May 18, 2013


  15. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Still have some doubts about Marqueses qualifications as they claimed to work for JLP on their website but at their interview with Last magazine, they worked for Paul Wilson of Newcastle and then as out workers for west end makers.
     


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