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Japanese Shoes: Bespoke & RTW Super Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by nutcracker, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. kallun

    kallun Senior member

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    Thanks for taking the time! Very interesting to read.

    /K
     


  2. nkapped

    nkapped Member

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    Bespoke shoemaker Hiro Yanagimachi is doing a trunk show in Singapore this weekend. Was pleased to catch up with him and pattern maker/closer Konomi Egawa whom I last saw at their workshop in Sendagaya, Tokyo. The MTO burgundy adelaides I ordered earlier this year are wearing in very well.

    Also had the chance to try on his new fitting loafers. He's still refining the last based on customer surveys and will debut this for MTO and MTM orders soon. I tried my usual size but there was a fair bit of heel slippage and this was only somewhat addressed by adding two additional insoles. As loafers are currently only available at the bespoke tier, this is something to keep in mind for future commissions.

    Here are some scenes from the trunk show, organized by local menswear store L.C. Via.

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    Last edited: Oct 14, 2017 at 12:17 AM


  3. daizawaguy

    daizawaguy Senior member

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    Visited Seiji McCarthy at the World Footwear Gallery in Jingumae just a short walk from Harajuku. Great passionate artisan with down to earth attitude and great customer service. Fantastic range of classic shoe styles with MTO, MTM and bespoke options. Fluent English for overseas customers and passionate about his craft. A great experience. Superb finish and great classic styles. Standard lasts with fitting shoes for MTO and modifications for MTM and bespoke too with wooden lasts built to customers specifications. A fantastic experience and well recommended.

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  4. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Damn.
     


  5. ThinkDerm

    ThinkDerm Senior member

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  6. coloRLOw

    coloRLOw Senior member

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    sorry for my silly question:

    how do they hide the welt stitch? i want to ask this question for a long time....:-(

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  7. ThunderMarch

    ThunderMarch Senior member

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    For a number of the Japanese bespoke makers, the outsole stitching is so fine, stitched so close to the uppers, and the welt so tightly fudged down, possibly along with the fact that their outsole stitching thread might be slightly finer, that it can be pretty hard to discern the individual stitches on the welt.

    Another technique, mainly used among the AH makers, which I've also seen in Jan Kielman, is that a thin flap (somewhat like the channel flap cut on the bottom surface of the outsole) is cut on the top surface of the welt, raised, and the outsole stitching is then done. The flap is then lowered and cemented down over the outsole stitching, thus concealing them. And then the fudging is done on top of this flap. So you see the fudging, but not the stitches.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2017 at 7:02 PM


  8. coloRLOw

    coloRLOw Senior member

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  9. Stefan88

    Stefan88 Senior member

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    Edward Green does the same as Kielman on some lasts and models
     


  10. ecwy

    ecwy Senior member

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    Blind welt on a GYW shoe?? Doesn't sound logical to me.
     


  11. ThunderMarch

    ThunderMarch Senior member

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    It's not exactly a blind welt.

    Blind welting refers more to how the waist is constructed, whereby the entire welt is as concealed as possible by being close to / beneath the uppers.

    The above "technique" is more of concealing the outsole stitching, the welt is still left very much exposed.
     


  12. ecwy

    ecwy Senior member

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    Actually, I'm referring to the German welt as opposed to the English welt. I thought your Kielman pair was a German/Blind welt that you are referring to. Maybe we are talking about different things :X
     


  13. Stefan88

    Stefan88 Senior member

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    What he described was not a blind welt, rather the stitching being hidden much like in a closed channel of the outsole.
     


  14. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I believe, in English shoe making this technique is called a 'dress welt'. It used to be quite popular, maybe up to the 1960s, but has become pretty rare. As a technique it's open to abuse: use big, maybe even untidy stitches underneath the flap and then cover it up with fine and delicate wheeling on top of the flap.

    'German welt' (I've only ever seen Marcell Mrsan using the term, but, for all I know, that might be the standard Hungarian name) is the same as 'blind welt' in English shoe making.
     


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