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Is this the new style for suits?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Bexcellence, May 30, 2012.

  1. Bexcellence

    Bexcellence Senior member

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    I picked up an Armani Collezioni suit and I noticed the shoulders seem a bit higher than the rest of the suit. Here's a pic example from another Armani suit on the website ($1,800)

    [​IMG]

    I know this differs from the flat, streamlined look, similar to this:

    [​IMG]



    So is this just an alternative way of wearing your suit jacket? Similar to cuffed/un-cuffed pants?
     
  2. othertravel

    othertravel Senior member

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    What you're noticing on the shoulder is roping. It's an alternative (British?) inspired style.

    Where did you get the suit from?
     
  3. burningbright

    burningbright Senior member

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    I thought it was called a Neapolitan shoulder, as in Italian-inspired.
     
  4. Bexcellence

    Bexcellence Senior member

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    bloomingdales
     
  5. jrd617

    jrd617 Senior member

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    It's not Neapolitan. Roped shoulders are Roman/Milanese/English military style. Neapolitan/Anderson & Sheppard/Scholte shoulders are lightly padded and typically "bald."
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2012
  6. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    Yeah, not new at all. I just had a suit made with slightly roped shoulders - I rather like the look.

    What is more concerning is the model with both buttons buttoned and the very closed quarters.
     
  7. David Reeves

    David Reeves Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    Yes it is the future although my clients are rather unnerved by it generally for now. Its of course of English origin.

    Here is one of my Bespoke pieces with a rather typical Savile Row shoulder line and light roping:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    You can get more roping on heavier cloths like tweeds:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I think closed quarters and longer coats are on the way back as well.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2012
  8. Bexcellence

    Bexcellence Senior member

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  9. Sanguis Mortuum

    Sanguis Mortuum Senior member

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    This type of roped shoulder is about as far from a Neapolitan shoulder as its possible to get, they're almost polar opposites.
     
  10. Xenon

    Xenon Senior member

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    The shoulders of the suit are not just roped but they are narrower than the wearers shoulder providing a tapered appearance upwards (and also narrower then the hips). In the second photo the suit shoulders seam to end where the wearer's shoulders end, making them look wider ( and wider than hips)

    All that said roping is always beautiful when done with precesion and not to much shoulder padding. Unfortuneatley some tailors seam to have difficulty creating a roped shoulder that is only lightly padded or unpadded. This is OK for men with normal to sloped shoulders but if you have square shoulders it can look top heavy with too much padding.
     
  11. Geezer

    Geezer Senior member

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    The ever-ebullient Eddie Rowlands made me an odd jacket some years ago featuring a fairly soft shoulder and a heavily roped sleevehead. It's the only one I have like it and I'm quite fond of that styling feature.

    The older I get, the more I find myself moving away from The Drape and admiring a firm shoulder with a roped armhole. It doesn't work if you are already boxy, but on tall thin chaps like me, it has its advantages.

    BTW, the suit in the OP's picture has so much wrong with it that I hardly know where to begin.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2012
  12. duggyald

    duggyald Senior member

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    Is it really a new style? I think I've seen this in previous years.
     
  13. TM79

    TM79 Senior member

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    Looks like a very short jacket length in pic 1 of the OP, no?
     
  14. GBR

    GBR Senior member

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    Short coats were last year's hideous 'must have' for those of little knowledge. Hopefully the sill habit will disappear soon and folk will not waste their hard earned money on such short term fashions.
     
  15. facet

    facet Senior member

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    Sweet, I can just keep my old navy suit and don't have to buy a new one.
     
  16. allaboutshoes

    allaboutshoes Senior member

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    It'll still look somewhat dated
     
  17. facet

    facet Senior member

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    Yeah, I was being somewhat facetious.
     
  18. allaboutshoes

    allaboutshoes Senior member

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    I know :satisfied: but teh n00bs may not realize
     
  19. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    There is a lot of confusion and conflation in this thread.

    There are two things going on here: the concave shape of the shoulder line, and the roping of the sleeve head. The two do not always go together.

    The shoulder line you depict is concave and called a "pagoda" shoulder. It refers to the curvature of the shoulder's line between the collar and the seam between the sleeve and jacket body. It does not include the sleeve or sleeve head and is defined completely distinct from them.

    "Roped shoulder" is commonly used to describe the mounded sleeve head in the picture. However, the term is a little confusing, as it it refers to the shaping of the sleeve head (the top of the sleeve, where it meets the jacket body) and has nothing to do with the shoulder line. Note, there is no actually roping in a roped shoulder. It just looks that way.

    You do not need to combine a roped sleeve head with a pagoda shoulder line, though they are often paired.

    Finally, though it has become common to use "Neapolitan" to describe a certain sort of shoulder treatment, that is also misleading. What is commonly commercialized as a "Neapolitan shoulder" is a sleeve head set into the shoulder seam as one would a shirt sleeve ("spalla camicia" means "shirt sleeve"). Why is that wrong? Because over the course of Neapolitan tailoring history, many different treatments of the sleeve head have been popular--including roped shoulders. Also, the terminology ignores the shape of the shoulder line. Common "Neapolitan" RTW brands like Kiton and Isaia sell jackets with very straight shoulder lines. There is nothing wrong with that, but today's Neapolitan bespoke tailors seem to either prefer a much more naturally rounded shoulder line (most common) or a pagoda-type shoulder (more rare).

    There is nothing about roped, pagoda shoulders that is more English or Savile Row than Neapolitan. Unless, of course, you are relying on GQ-level tailoring terminology.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2012
    1 person likes this.

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