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Is this green and blue plaid shirt an eyesore or fashionable?

jwolfe890

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I'm having a difficult time determining whether or not this green and blue plaid shirt from Barbour is a total eyesore or vibrant and fashionable.

These are colors that typically look good with my skin tone, but not sure about them paired together like this. I know some people believe that green and blue should never be paired directly together. Interested to hear others' opinions on it.

eyesore.jpeg
 
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dieworkwear

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I wouldn't call it an eyesore, but also wouldn't call it pleasing.
 

TheChihuahua

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Eye sore. Hurt my eyes.
Something about it pops too much. Like the colors are too stark a contrast. Nothing against either color individually but together it’s real loud.
Could probably be fine in the right setting though
 

johng70

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I'm also in the camp of that shirt looking ugly.
 

mak1277

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Looks fine to wear to a backyard BBQ or something. I wouldn't wear it to the office.

Also, if you're on the fence, why even sweat it? Just move on to something else that you know you like.
 

TheIronDandy

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If you have to consider if something is an eye-sore, I strongly suggest not wearing it.
 

rjc149

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I'm not really for or against the color scheme, which I think is totally inoffensive for casual settings.

I'm not a fan of the cut, which I've found to be consistent with Barbour's offerings, especially their jackets. The shirt appears to be too long and too narrow, particularly in the chest and shoulders. I believe men's shirts should accentuate or at least give the appearance of a V profile, like a jacket/sport coat.

In my opinion, I also think button collars accentuate the head, whereas regular collars, by directing visual lines outward, accentuate the chest and shoulders, which is more flattering.

It could be the dainty build of the model, not his shirt.
 

dieworkwear

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I believe men's shirts should accentuate or at least give the appearance of a V profile, like a jacket/sport coat.
How would a shirt give a v-shaped silhouette? Assuming the wearer doesn't already have one himself?
 

rjc149

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How would a shirt give a v-shaped silhouette? Assuming the wearer doesn't already have one himself?
I imagine it would be cut slightly more trim around the midsection, and roomier around the chest and shoulders, to thus form a gradual taper down to the waist? Ie. a "tailored" fit? Maybe that doesn't work on skinny men, I don't know. I lift, bro.

I believe this particular model would look more flattered if the shirt were slightly shorter or tucked, if he unbuttoned the top button, and went with unbuttoned collars. Yes the man clearly eschews weight lifting, which is whatever, to each his own, but the long parallel lines of the shirt elongate his torso and accentuate its narrowness.
 

jwolfe890

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That's a good point. What sorts of shirts do you feel capture that look though?
 

dieworkwear

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I imagine it would be cut slightly more trim around the midsection, and roomier around the chest and shoulders, to thus form a gradual taper down to the waist? Ie. a "tailored" fit? Maybe that doesn't work on skinny men, I don't know. I lift, bro.

I believe this particular model would look more flattered if the shirt were slightly shorter or tucked, if he unbuttoned the top button, and went with unbuttoned collars. Yes the man clearly eschews weight lifting, which is whatever, to each his own, but the long parallel lines of the shirt elongate his torso and accentuate its narrowness.
You can certainly create different silhouettes with shirts. But you can't create a v-shaped silhouette because there's no structure inside. Unless you naturally have a v-shaped figure, an extended shoulder line is just going to flop off your shoulder joints. And you can only take in the waist as much as the body allows.
 

rjc149

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That's a good point. What sorts of shirts do you feel capture that look though?
So I've recently taken many of my bespoke dress shirts to my tailor, to be converted into untucked short-sleeve summer shirts. They were originally made for my torso, so they retain that V fit. I think they look great and I get a lot of compliments on them.

I like wearing long-sleeved linen button-down shirts in the summer, with 2-3 of the top buttons undone and a wifebeater beneath. The larger V opening at the neck would either compliment the V torso shape on someone like me, or give the impression of one on someone skinnier. The collars spread out, pointing at the shoulders, creates the impression of larger, more impressive shoulders.

For a button-down shirt, they're best worn untucked when they've been cut that way. The shirt above appears like it should be tucked. Shortening the appearance of the torso relative to the legs also better proportions its appearance. If this shirt were tucked and unbuttoned at the top, it would create a taper at the waist which would flatter the model's skinny upper body.
 

rjc149

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You can certainly create different silhouettes with shirts. But you can't create a v-shaped silhouette because there's no structure inside. Unless you naturally have a v-shaped figure, an extended shoulder line is just going to flop off your shoulder joints. And you can only take in the waist as much as the body allows.
In terms of visual proportion, this model would do best to tuck his shirt, or wear a shirt cut to be worn untucked. Shortening his torso would proportionally widen it, which would make him appear less skinny and narrow.
 

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