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Is there a difference between style & well-dressed

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by johnnynorman3, Dec 22, 2004.

  1. ernest

    ernest Senior member

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    I'm asking myself :

    1) " why does a woman want to talk about men's clothes on a forum" ?

    2) " How did she arrived here " ?
     
  2. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (Phil @ 22 Dec. 2004, 2:26) I dont get why people are so concerned with how they are viewed in their offices with respect to their clothing. Â I get the sense most people walk around on eggshells because they dont want to offend the boss, offend the coworkers, offend the clients. Â It seems a bit silly to me.
    I agree with you to a certain extent, but I think at least in the legal field (and from my perspective) what people think IS important- it is very much a part of your business and your profession. Â You sound like you dress quite conservatively, so I imagine it's rarely of any issue to you anyways in your business.
    it is pretty simple - you need to decide if you are comfortable doing business with somebody you don't know. "doing business" might be buying a paaper from him, or it might mean letting him plan your families estate. if you are buying a paper, the trust doesn't have to be that great. if it is something very high in importance, you are going to want to understand a little bit about him, and if you can trust him. you don't have that much info, so how he dresses gives you hints. in theory, anyway. so, to a large extent, people are dressing to fit the stereotype of what their potential business partners or mates might be looking for. and think about it, if you are talking to a banker about your mortgage, and he is wearing a hell's angels jacket and fishnet stockings, you would be totally freaked out. that is an exageration of the normal situation - people are looking for subtle clues like ties, shoes, cut of suit, to understand if they can really trust people that they don't know very well.
     
  3. Phil

    Phil Senior member

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    I agree with that assesment Globetrotter. I think you are right, people look for subtle clues when assessing someone, from business to the dating scene. However, dressing stylishly or well shouldnt be held against you in the trust dept. In fact, it should be the other way around. The lawyer our company works with is so deplorably dressed that I have a hard time taking him seriously. In his case, "dressing like a lawyer" hasnt helped his business at all.

    I have been told dozens of times over the years that I have gotten business because of the way I dress. This is what some of my clients have said:

    1. I remembered you over other sales people because you were dressed so nicely.
    2. Seeing how you are dressed makes me think you have a greater attention to detail because of of effort and detail you put into your dress.

    Concerning the legal profession specifically, some of the most successful lawyers could be considered stylish in their own right (although certainly not MY style) - Johnny Cochran and Jerry Spence come to mind.
     
  4. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    phil,

    I agree, I have actually used this argument many times to justify why people should dress well for work, but I think that it also can be used to understand why too much personal style might not be such a good idea. I think that one of the first bond books mentions not trusting anybody who wears a Windsor knot (and bear with me if I am making a mistake, I read them about 20 years ago) - the infurance being that anybody who took so much time and effort to tie his tie, and did it differently from the rest of his class, was not to be trusted.

    this is a real borderline issue. I would expect a bow tie, for instance, on somebody who was in a staff position. I would feel unsure about a line manager in a bow tie. I (myself, personally) would be uncomfortable about trusting somebody, for instance, in a 5 botton single breasted suit, or a purple suit, or in a white suit in winter, etc. some people might think that those are perfectly acceptable personal style statments, in the same way that I wear contrast collar shirts and double breasted suits and some people might not trust that.
     
  5. Phil

    Phil Senior member

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    Fair points, but in reality, I would wager an awfully large amount of money that 99.99999999% of american men have no idea what a windsor knot is, much less be able to recognize someone else wearing one.
     
  6. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    agreed, but I bet if you came into a meeting in kansas with a matching bow tie and pocket square, and a double breasted suit and spectator shoes, people might not know what it was, but they would know it was unusal.
     
  7. Phil

    Phil Senior member

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    well said. But the question is, would that person be treated worse as a result? I dont know that answer. But I sure as hell know I ever have to go to Kansas, I am not wearing white socks and a short sleeve dress shirt just because I might fit in better.
     
  8. Eric

    Eric Senior member

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    I really think sometimes we overestimate the importance of apperance. People form opinions of others based on more than just apperances.

    Two different people could get completely different reactions when wearing the same outfit.

    Eric
     
  9. Bradford

    Bradford Senior member

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    With tact like that - to think I ever wondered why Ernest is unemployed  [​IMG] Bradford
     
  10. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (Phil @ 23 Dec. 2004, 08:13) well said. But the question is, would that person be treated worse as a result? Â I dont know that answer. Â But I sure as hell know I ever have to go to Kansas, I am not wearing white socks and a short sleeve dress shirt just because I might fit in better.
    I really think sometimes we overestimate the importance of apperance. Â People form opinions of others based on more than just apperances. Two different people could get completely different reactions when wearing the same outfit. Eric
    Eric, maybe you are right. but in many situations where we have a short time to create an impression, apperence is the only form of comunication that we have. it also seems, according to many studies, that first impressions are very difficult to change. and yes, 2 people could get very different reactions while wearing the same outfit - look at danny divito and Arnald wearing the same outfit in the movie "twins".
     
  11. Eric

    Eric Senior member

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    Globetrotter, good points. To each his own right? Neither school of thought has to nessecarily be wrong.

    Eric
     
  12. leroy

    leroy Active Member

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    well-dressed might not mean stylish. what we choose to wear reflects our personality, whether being well-dressed, poorly dressed or stylish.

    example is my boss who is traditional and conservative has all along been well-dressed with perfectly tailored suits and dress shirts + well-made classic ties. but we can never expect anything stylish from him. because he will never try something more like check patterned dress shirts with window-pane suits. it is also the reflection of his personality base on his choice of dress-up: conservative.

    instead the younger group of colleagues would attempt to go for something stylish. their tailor-made dress shirts are full of patterns with wide spread collars. they are keen to play around with clothing. however, whether these stylish attempts turn out to be well-dressed can be difficult to judge and depends on whose point of view: mine or my boss'. naturally, my boss would scan us from head to toe and shake his head in disagreement.
     
  13. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    so wearing check shirts with window pane shirts is the difference between stylish and well dressed?
     
  14. gorgekko

    gorgekko Senior member

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    This is why I work for myself. I don't need someone who can't dress passing judgment on me.
     
  15. SmartDresser

    SmartDresser Well-Known Member

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    Dress to be appropriate. In court, in office, Friday night mixer. All have a specific use. Some are for the pleasure of others, some are for self-expression. Hope this helps. I know it is vague. [​IMG]
     
  16. Jeannine

    Jeannine New Member

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    Originally Posted by Fabienne,23 Dec. 2004, 01:38
    (OK, I'm a woman, but still.)
    I'm  asking myself : 1) " why does a woman want to talk about men's clothes on a forum" ? 2) " How did she arrived here " ?
    ernest, I've decided to de-lurk just to answer you. I'm approx. 75% responsible for the wardrobe of the man in my life. He's in a profession/situation where he has to be well dressed, stylish and appropriate at all times. Besides suit fitting which he goes in for, I pretty much ransack stores bringing home what I think will either fit into his wardrobe or steer it into the direction he's wanting to take it. He tries on, next day I return the unwanted pieces. I think a lot of women have come by this role one way or another so I don't think it's odd at all that women are on this board. There are probably a lot more of us than you'd think - we just usually lurk. :)
     
  17. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    I think an example will illustrate the difference between being "stylish" and being merely "well dressed." Any man (or woman,) can learn (and be taught) how to dance tango steps. He can learn basic steps, intermediate sequences, even entire, intricate dances, but his repetoire will always be limited to what someone else has taught him. A real dancer, however, understands and can create something new from the basic elements everytime he steps onto the floor.
     
  18. Jeannine

    Jeannine New Member

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    la guy -

    ha ha, I love that analogy.
     
  19. tiger02

    tiger02 Senior member

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    Jeannine, you'll find that once you de-lurk, there's no going back. Â [​IMG] -Tom, who rode the pine for a year before signing up
     

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