Is being a sportsfan a sign of plebeian tastes and culture?

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by Soph, Sep 24, 2006.

  1. dusty

    dusty Senior member

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    "Sophistication" without a common touch and a love for the "plebeian" is boring and one-dimensional.

    Mm, well said.
     
  2. Rome

    Rome Mr. Chocolates Godiva

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    Sophistication doesn’t need a “love” of the plebian per se but an understanding of it if only to differentiate.

    I find fanaticism of any sort to be an escapist ruse.
     
  3. Ivan Kipling

    Ivan Kipling Senior member

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    Plebeian types can be found anywhere. No reason to single out those who enjoy sports.
     
  4. Young Scrappy

    Young Scrappy Senior member

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    Of course, some theorists would maintain that large-scale sports events were devised to keep the masses at bay, and generally satisfied; same with religion.

    What theorists are these?


    This is a great question. I think it doesn't lie in the choice of sport but on how one appreciates the sport. There are nuances and strategy in almost every sport. Essentially, every sport can be a thinking man's game. On the other hand, there are people who watch basketball for dunks, boxing for knockouts, NASCAR for wrecks, etc. which is low-brow in my opinion. Sportstalk radio, Sportscenter, and fantasy sports have bastardized the major sports. Its given sports a perception of a statistical driven male soap opera. And we all know soap operas are undoubtedly plebeian.
     
  5. ATM

    ATM Senior member

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    Some sports change over time. I believe bowling was exclusively upper-class originally.
     
  6. countdemoney

    countdemoney Senior member

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    Some sports change over time. I believe bowling was exclusively upper-class originally.

    Don't forget golf.

    There's nothing like the sound of, "IN THE HOLE!!!" the moment a ball even reaches the green.
     
  7. Dakota rube

    Dakota rube Senior member

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    If one's definition of plebeian is restricted to "common" there is probably some truth to the OP's question. But the term seems unfairly pejorative. When one witnesses 100,000+ at a college football game, at a soccer match, at a Nascar race, "common" seems proper terminology.

    But to equate that large attendance with tastes of a common sort (as opposed to us terribly cultured, stylish and discriminating gentlemen here) is unfair.

    I'd forward for consideration the sponsors sporting goods attract, both on-site and through advertising tie-ins. Obviously many consumer goods manufacturers have attached themselves (see Nascar paintjobs, etc.) but when I see who PGA golfers (for instance) are sponsored by, I see companies that are as far removed from plebeian as I am from young and handsome.
     
  8. countdemoney

    countdemoney Senior member

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    Where you referring to Buick, Nike and the, "Big Bertha?"

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  9. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    I think not being a sports fan is a sign of wussiness. Tell your friend to hike his skirt up a bit.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    It seems the more "personal"-oriented sports or individual type sports like riding or golf are more attentive to a person's development whereas large-scale spectator sports like American football, tends to obscure personalities thus conjuring the mass mentality.
    True. You end up with bland ciphers like T.O., Chad Johnson, Joe Namath, Dennis Rodman, Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, and the like.
     
  11. Stax

    Stax Senior member

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    I think not being a sports fan is a sign of wussiness. Tell your friend to hike his skirt up a bit.
    [​IMG]


    co-[​IMG]
     
  12. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Yeah, stupid classless U.S. sports fans!
    [​IMG]
     
  13. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    I hate sports, but have many other lowbrow tastes. I'm a pleb in spite of myself.
     
  14. Brian SD

    Brian SD Moderator

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    I only like classy sports like Golf and Polo. I need to appear sophisticated to all my friends.
     
  15. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    True. You end up with bland ciphers like T.O., Chad Johnson, Joe Namath, Dennis Rodman, Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, and the like.
    I don't mean the actual athletes but the fans.
     

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