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Ironing - I can't stand it!

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by gregory, Feb 15, 2005.

  1. gorgekko

    gorgekko Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you on this one...ironing takes my mind off seemingly intractible problems and gives me time to decompress. I can go back to writing easier after a couple of shirts have been subjugated by their cruel master.
     
  2. Thracozaag

    Thracozaag Well-Known Member

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    Ironing and doing the dishes is therapuetic for me. [​IMG] koji
     
  3. bch

    bch Well-Known Member

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    I wash and iron all my shirts. You need a decent weighty iron with good steam output. I use a $100 Rowenta. You also need to make sure that your iron pad is not so thin that the holes in your ironing board won't be imprinted on your shirt. Magic Sizing (not starch) sprayed on the shirt before ironing makes ironing a breeze and gives the shirt a little body and wrinkle resistance. As far as I know, sizing does not have the same destructive properties over time that starch has. Starch also is sticky and a pain in the ass because it flakes. I found this to be a good primer: Here Usually takes me less than 10 minutes per shirt. So, figure an hour per week.
     
  4. Fabienne

    Fabienne Well-Known Member

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    (philosophe @ Feb. 15 2005,21:37) I confess that I find ironing fairly relaxing. Â I'm working on a book and find that ironing is much-needed instant gratification. But it does take time.
    I agree with you on this one...ironing takes my mind off seemingly intractible problems and gives me time to decompress. I can go back to writing easier after a couple of shirts have been subjugated by their cruel master.
    I used to 1) listen to music 2) watch television while ironing. Now my husband does a lot of my ironing without my even asking. [​IMG]
     
  5. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Well-Known Member

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    A member called to R.S.V.P. for the Sartorial Excellence event today with a great idea. Net result - I'll be bringing an iron, a spray bottle ... and my laundry ... to the event. Demonstrations will take place every hour on the half-hour. That is, until someone shows up with one of those la-de-dah red wines advertised in the Black Suit thread. No, Chuck. I shall be demonstrating on my laundry, not yours. But nice try.
     
  6. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Well-Known Member

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    For some odd reason when I iron, no matter how new the iron is, the shirt seems dirty to me. Is it my imagination or do irons give shirt a very slight ting of grunginess.
     
  7. johnw86

    johnw86 Well-Known Member

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    And the rest of the shirt...?
     
  8. linux_pro

    linux_pro Well-Known Member

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    THank you for that excellent post.
     
  9. 4Mica

    4Mica Well-Known Member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  10. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Well-Known Member

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    Most likely your washer is not completely removing the detergent. Try washing 2x and do the second cycle without detergent. Detergent tends to look brownish when ironed.
     
  11. Fabienne

    Fabienne Well-Known Member

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    (Fabienne @ Feb. 16 2005,12:12)
    I used to 1) listen to music 2) watch television while ironing. Â Now my husband does a lot of my ironing without my even asking. Â [​IMG]
    I iron all my clothes (which I find to be relaxing) and for a while I ironed my wife's as well but finally gave up because I dislike ironing around the darts in women's shirts. Â Ironing men's shirts=relaxing, ironing women's shirts=pain in the a**.[/quote] I do have a few items that are complicated to iron, no doubt. Still, he loves me. On the other hand, I am too afraid to iron his shirts. I exchange for other services.
     
  12. 4Mica

    4Mica Well-Known Member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  13. Doctor Crane

    Doctor Crane Well-Known Member

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    Alright, here's my problem: I actually don't mind ironing shirts but I find the results always horrible. Whenever I put the thing on, it immediately crinkles and wrinkles, especially in the arms and around the stomach where the shirt moves the most and is the most susceptible to creasing. In fact, it seems the starch only serves to help make the creases that develop that much stiffer. However, whenever I send the shirts out to get starched, I can go an entire day without looking like I'm wearing a linen shirt. Certainly I must be doing something wrong. Is it the type of starch I'm using... or how I iron... or a lost cause?
     
  14. j

    j Well-Known Member

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    What is your method, Dr.?
     
  15. Kai

    Kai Well-Known Member

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    Don't dry the shirt. Wash it, then iron it while it is damp.

    I send out most of my shirts to the cleaners, but my formal shirt I iron myself. Ironing while the shirt is damp makes it much easier.
     
  16. Doctor Crane

    Doctor Crane Well-Known Member

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    Normally when I iron my shirts they're bone dry as I've never really seen a need to dampen them on the account of the steam iron I use and the starch as I figured they moisten the shirt enough. Recently, after spraying the shirt with the starch I wait about a minute or so until I start ironing to let the fibers soak everything up, though in the end it doesn't appear to change anything.
     
  17. j

    j Well-Known Member

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    Steam iron alone won't do it. You need to either leave them damp or redampen them with a spray bottle, and then roll them up and let the water soak in a bit. Then iron out, I use medium steam. Once you have done a panel, let it sit on the board for a few seconds to "set", then peel off and move on. Using this method you can probably forego the starch.
     
  18. stache

    stache Well-Known Member

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    If you put the shirt in the dryer make sure that the dryer is not stuffed, and pull out the shirt when it is slightly damp. Even if you can't press it right away, put it on a hanger. This makes pressing out whatever wrinkles are there much easier.
     
  19. Gatsby

    Gatsby Well-Known Member

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    I feel like I'm definitely part of the anti-ironing crew.. The problem is that perfectionist tendencies cause me to spend almost 20 minutes on one shirt and it'll still never turn out that great. It feels even worse when you wear the shirt and about an hour later you notice all the wrinkles in the sleeves for normal movement... it's just a never-ending cycle of pain. This has led me to buy thicker 'durable' fabrics (Polo oxford shirts are amazingly wrinkle resistant, but blousey..)

    That said, my local cleaners are the nicest people, the prices are decent, but the quality is only so-so. I would stop going but they are just so close to my place. If only they hand-pressed...

    BTW: Do any quality RTW shirts (Borelli, Barba, T&A, et al.) use non-iron fabrics??
     
  20. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Well-Known Member

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    I'm not surprised. It takes me 27 minutes. Mull that.
     

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