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Investing in Quality vs. Senseless Waste of Money

Artisan Fan

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The only thing that goes wrong for men these days is that some invisible power tells them to pretend not to care which perpetuates the ignorance and ultimately the disappointment when they market they buy from sells them marked up things that are not a "manly" quality.
Very true. Most of my friends who appreciate good clothes rarely discuss it in public among strangers.
 

LARon

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Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant
There's no shortage of research showing that interview style (clothing, grooming) deemed inappropriate results in not getting the job.

I don't think anyone would dispute that "inappropriate" dress has a tangible downside. But thats not the subject of the thread.

The question here is: of the different levels of appropriate dress (i.e., dress that presents well in an interview, to invoke your context), does it make sense to spend $4,000 when the same presentation/look can be had for $1,000 (particularly if the price difference is driven by craftsmanship or marketing features not discernible to the average Joe)?
 

thinman

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Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant
Also, quality shoes can save money by preventing costly foot injuries.

This is why I buy quality shoes. Did I mention that my MTM Oxxford suit also protects me from costly and potentially debilitating injuries. When I wear it I only cross the street in cross-walks to avoid unsightly blood stains on the suit. Imagine the potential benefits of going bespoke!
nod[1].gif
 

jmonroestyle

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I would think that with interviews, dressing "too well" can actually be a negative. I would think that if one's attire is way beyond the "standard" of the company it may make the interviewer feel uncomfortable. Of course this is a case by case basis.

I would say this can apply to social situations also. I think one should always find the line that separates looking sharp and making others feel uncomfortable.
 

masqueofhastur

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Originally Posted by DocHolliday
MIC, this is my favorite sentence posted on SF this week. It should be someone's tag.

Heh, I'm not sure they could prevent injuries, reduce cramps yes.
 

mensimageconsultant

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There definitely is such a thing as dressing too well for an interview. It sounds right that wearing cheap items (even those that are in good condition, fit well, and are of basically the correct type) can hurt employment chances (think polyester). However, while clothing quality has been shown to affect treatment while shopping, researchers probably have not bothered to explore its effect on interviews. (Actually, it's a matter of funding. There is a lack of money for clothing studies.)

Quality shoes can protect the feet, if the quality is reflected in sturdier soles.
 

masqueofhastur

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Unless you're stepping on a nail, sturdier soles aren't going to prevent foot injuries, and stepping on a nail isn't costlier than an average trip to the drugstore assuming you don't get an infection. That's still quite unlikely. A good pair of shoes might help prevent foot, leg or back problems, but you're not going to have any injury prevention unless they're steel toed with solid ankle support. I've never seen a pair of dress shoes like that.
 

Film Noir Buff

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Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant
There definitely is such a thing as dressing too well for an interview. It sounds right that wearing cheap items (even those that are in good condition, fit well, and are of basically the correct type) can hurt employment chances (think polyester). However, while clothing quality has been shown to affect treatment while shopping, researchers probably have not bothered to explore its effect on interviews. (Actually, it's a matter of funding. There is a lack of money for clothing studies.)

Quality shoes can protect the feet, if the quality is reflected in sturdier soles.



No, but there was a time when the trial lawyers association (or something like that) spent a lot to see the reactions different jury demographics exhibited when exposed to certain types of clothes. The trial lawyers are very concerned with reactions elicited by what they or their clients wear. I have no idea if they still conduct this research or how one can get their paws on it but it would be an interesting read.
 

mensimageconsultant

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You're saying that shoes can prevent foot problems, but the soles aren't part of that? Why not? Assuming the fit is okay, the upper isn't going to affect the structure of the foot. Okay, soles and arch support aren't the same thing, but inbuilt good arch support ought to keep weak arches from falling, for example.
 

masqueofhastur

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Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant
You're saying that shoes can prevent foot problems, but the soles aren't part of that? Why not? Assuming the fit is okay, the upper isn't going to affect the structure of the foot. Okay, soles and arch support aren't the same thing, but inbuilt good arch support ought to keep weak arches from falling, for example.

I'm saying a problem isn't an injury. Foot cramps, blisters, corns, bunions, etc. are all not injuries.
 

Quirk

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Originally Posted by epa
I do a lot of computer work, and the cuffs are the first thing that become worn out on my shirts. Especially French cuffs on colured shirts rapidly feature white worn-out portions where the free edges get together (the down-facing side of the cuff).

Originally Posted by Quirk
You could always wear them as folded-back barrel cuffs with links.

Originally Posted by epa
How?

As in example #2 on the website linked below. The example #1 variation might also help you conceal the worn edges of the cuff.

http://www.manligt.net/viewtopic.php?t=13151
 

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