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Incorrect terminologies

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by uriahheep, Mar 12, 2005.

  1. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    I'm not Alex either (duh) but I think your assumption in correct. I also have a few linen and linen / cotton mix shirts that use folded fabric and they look similar to the shirt in question.

    Jon.
     


  2. MCA

    MCA Well-Known Member

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    Hi uriah,

    Although my comment centered on the "see through" aspect of the cloth, vis-à-vis the Irish linens I've seen, and not on what is showing through, either the cloth itself or interlining, I appreciate your observation.
     


  3. uriahheep

    uriahheep Senior member

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    The darker-than-usual mannequin could be part of the reason for the "sheer" effect.
     


  4. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    No. Â See Fowler and entries in OED. Â And might as well consider the entire tradition of literature in English. As for the pedantic fora -- One would expect then, those who argue for fora over forums (I'll stick to forums) to decline the noun properly in all uses.
     


  5. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    [​IMG] You're not serious?? The idea of strapping my shirt to my socks sounds really uncomfortable at the very least...
     


  6. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

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    Hummmph. Another breakable under penalty of rulered knuckles caveat of Grandfather's beautiful British education struck down. I shall also immediately begin to say Tooosday rather than Tewsday. I stand sadly bested, rejected, and corrected.

    And I shall remain boringly correct.
     


  7. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

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    You are seening the multiple layers of linen used to provide strength to the button/buttonhole areas of the front and to provide the support necessary for the collar. No interlining is used in the fronts.

    And, yes, there are dozens, perhaps hundreds, of weights of Irish linen in use today ... though, these days, the majority of it is either Belgian or Chekoslovakian linen.
     


  8. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    The use of "blazer" to refer to any and all odd jackets.  A true blazer is navy blue, with metal buttons.  Purists will say that it must be DB as well.  Hard-core sticklers will go further and say that it must be 4x2 DB with open patch pockets.  I'm not sure I'd go that far.  In any case, a tweed jacket is not a blazer.
     


  9. wja

    wja Well-Known Member

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    Horace says:
    The second declension neuter nominative plural "fora" sounds awkward, but is as correct as the day is long. Can you give an example of improper usage? Re-reading this I wonder if it is this one moment in life for which the Latin nun was setting me up. [​IMG]
     


  10. StagRaven

    StagRaven Well-Known Member

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    Such is life in a system where everything fits properly but the shirts, and yet we're held to a strict standard of wear anyway. It's not really uncomfortable once you figure out the right length to make them, the problem is that they shave all the hair off your legs in an X pattern. Then again, the trousers we wear take off all the hair on the front of our legs, so it's not like that's anything new.
     


  11. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

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    I was in complete agreement until I reached 'open patch pockets'. Seems a bit incongruous, no? Somewhat like a vintage Cadillac with blackwall tires. Or a Big Mac and fries with a Diet Coke. [​IMG]
     


  12. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    No, that is the classic blazer. Not sure why. I've never run accross even an attempt at an explanation.
     


  13. naturlaut

    naturlaut Senior member

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    I agree with the patch pockets on a classic blazer, though I'm not quite sure why you call them 'open' patch pockets. Is there such thing as a closed patch pocket?

    I think the proper term for a jacket is 'jacket' instead of 'coat'.

    'Trousers' and 'pants' are the same thing. 'Pants' is the American corruption of the Italian word 'pantaloni', which means trousers.
     


  14. naturlaut

    naturlaut Senior member

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    And since we are on terminologies, is there a name for the 'James Bond shirt cuffs' --- a folded back cuffs but cutaway on the edge to give way for two buttons?

    The English (or rather, at Turnbull) always call their French cuffs 'double cuffs'.
     


  15. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

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    Yes. Given the obvious Francophobia, doesn't it continue to surprise that the Chunnel actually made it to completion?

    The James Bond cuffs have at times been referred to as "M" cuffs, an appelation derived from one of their popular shapes.
     


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