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In this thread you ask how to behave in restaurants and other locations, and people who have been ou

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by itsstillmatt, Aug 1, 2011.

  1. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Food truck operating costs are also way lower. Just sayin. Then again, I don't eat from food trucks so I never encounter this problem.
     
  2. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    Food trucks are awesome. You're missing out.

    Speaking of which, I should hit up Halal Guys this weekend :slayer:
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2013
  3. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I fucking hate food trucks. So annoying clogging up the streets, and creating mobs of people. Plus, I have no desire to stand on the street and eat.
     
    2 people like this.
  4. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I never feel obligated to tip a cashier for takeout.

    However, if it's a place I frequent, and the cashier is very friendly to me, then I might consider it.
     
  5. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    perhaps. I have a friend who is starting one in San Francisco, and the cost of entry is amazingly high. It's not just the cost of a truck + cost of food + finding a spot to park. A lot of food trucks aren't only trucks, but also restaurants or catering businesses. Both of these are really done out of a kitchen and not a truck.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2013
  6. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    If you can't run your food truck out of your truck, where is the benefit? Just reaching out to more customers?
     
  7. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    1) Learn proper pronoun use, shitbird.
    2) Stop being a pretentious assmunch.


    Unless you're in a place like NYC with with a strong pedestrian culture and there are carts to cater to walkers, the idea is stupid. Especially when you have "Food Truck Parks" which are just outdoor food courts with no seating.
     
  8. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    the truck is the selling point. Some cooking can be done there, but not all cooking. You don't see the halal guys mixing schwarma or steaming rice at their stand, all of this stuff is done offsite.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2013
  9. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    But why is a stationary food truck a better selling point than a brick-and-mortar restaurant? Apparently, you need to lease the physical space anyway.
     
  10. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    2 people can run everything. in a restaurant you need a whole staff, and you have to deal with people that eat at restaurants, which sucks. In the truck, you're not cranking out as much revenue, but expenses are lower as well. And, from what I gather, there's usually plenty of places that'll rent out kitchens for a few hours (a fact that I was not aware of).
     
  11. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I was speaking specifically to food trucks that are run out of existing restaurant/catering businesses, per your earlier post.
     
  12. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    You can get a tiny 300 sq ft production kitchen for a food truck. Way cheaper than brick and mortar plus a dining room plus glassware plus silverware plus wait staff. Restaurants are incredibly expensive ventures.

    Nvmind, just saw your follow up post
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2013
  13. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    as has been repeatedly stated, startup costs are WAY lower (in LA, you've gotta spend probably $500,000 to get going in a brick and mortar). there are a couple of reasons existing b&ms do trucks: it might be a good way of building buzz (trucks and social media go hand-in-hand); it's a way of reaching customers who might be outside of your normal draw; and probably more important -- because everyone else is doing it. when i saw a sizzlin' sirloin food truck, i knew the trend was just about played out.
     
  14. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    So never.
     
  15. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    lol
     
  16. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    Yep. At least in DC there are actually quite a few restaurants that have startted their own food trucks (one for marketing and two for market share) and many food trucks that have opened up restaurants.
     
  17. wootx

    wootx Senior member

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    You sit down, unfold the napkin (but not entirely), put it on your legs and keep it there until the end of the meal.

    When standing up for whatever reason you place it on the side of your plate, without folding it. However, if you are having the meal in a place in which you are supposed to eat more than once the napkin should be folded and placed beside the plate -- I'm thinking somebody hosting you for some time here.

    The napkin-on-legs "rule" was not intended with the purpose of keeping you clean, but rather preventing your tablemates from seeing any of the filth on the napkin: THAT would be gross on a table.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2013
  18. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    That is the point. A used napkin is unappetizing to others. So, I'd rather leave it on my seat than put it next to my plate, should I get up from the table for any reason.
     
  19. Svenn

    Svenn Senior member

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    I don't like the idea of something that may touch my mouth again, being placed on an area that has seen so many buttocks... who knows what kind of residual fecal matter could be on there. I quickly fold or crumple the napkin to a clean part then put next to the plate before leaving.
     
  20. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    I leave mine on the seat as well. I also fold the napkin as I use it, so no one is ever exposed to the horrors on the inside, so long as we're dining.
     

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