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Images from The London Cut

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by voxsartoria, Jun 23, 2009.

  1. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Senior member

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    I think this is the Bianca/Mick homage.

    [​IMG]

    In reality, they are remakes of Edward Sexton's white wedding three-piece suits for Lord and Lady Montagu. You can see he 1971 originals hanging behind in this shot from the Florence exhibit:

    [​IMG]

    Thanks, Vox, for posting these.

    You're welcome.

    English tailoring is inventive and deep in a way Italian tailoring is not.

    Yeah: I said that. Who wants to fight me?


    - B
     
  2. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    [​IMG]


    [​IMG] For the class, the suit on the left demonstrates how a women's jacket is supposed to fit.
    Awesome


    I do like those lapels.
     
  3. Parker

    Parker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Amazing. Amazing. Amazing. Thank you.

    And sweet redemption for all those critique my Jantzen threads.
     
  4. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Senior member

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    I do like those lapels.

    I would assume that you might be facile with Lord Montagu trivia.

    - B
     
  5. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Senior member

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    Amazing. Amazing. Amazing. Thank you.

    And sweet redemption for all those critique my Jantzen threads.


    Did I post one of those?

    If so, I apologize, although I have never ordered anything from them.


    - B
     
  6. pejsek

    pejsek Senior member

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    English tailoring is inventive and deep in a way Italian tailoring is not.

    Yeah: I said that. Who wants to fight me?


    - B


    If this is the manifesto, I'll sign. It's a good (if mildly provocative) way to put it. I reach for Italian clothes as much as anything these days, in part precisely because they are less loaded and complicated and, hence, more easily understood. English tailoring can be downright odd and perplexing and I guess that's largely because it draws from a deeper well of both experience and creativity. One may be the master; the other the facile pupil and craftsman.

    Am I walking the line?
     
  7. Parker

    Parker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    No, no. I just meant in general. It's nice to have threads like these (good quality images, historical significance) occasionally to remember how inspiring great clothing can be.
     
  8. axe

    axe Senior member

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    If this is the manifesto, I'll sign. It's a good (if mildly provocative) way to put it. I reach for Italian clothes as much as anything these days, in part precisely because they are less loaded and complicated and, hence, more easily understood. English tailoring can be downright odd and perplexing and I guess that's largely because it draws from a deeper well of both experience and creativity. One may be the master; the other the facile pupil and craftsman. Am I walking the line?
    That isn't particularly fair to the Italians, since the country itself is a remarkably recent creation. I think the medieval city-states of the Italian peninsula had better things to do than busy themselves with pretty clothes, at least in comparison to the Britain of the time, which was relatively safe in its isolation, and was probably the richest and most powerful nation of the period. The people of renaissance Italy seemed drawn more to fine art than clothing, anyhow. The Britons never matched them in that regard.
     
  9. tutee

    tutee Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    It is about 20x better looking than the average, closed up A&S jackets, at least to my eyes.

    +1000! Still even I like it better if the front quarters are rounded when cutaway like yours, especially for sport coats.
    Matt if only all of your posts were this sensible. [​IMG]

    Man Good Heavens! I just realized you have 20000+ posts in 3 years? How do you manage this?

    BTW Kudos to Vox for posting these. Good images, although many are impractical for us but still a visual treat.
     
  10. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Man Good Heavens! I just realized you have 20000+ posts in 3 years? How do you manage this?
    They include the amount of thought that goes into 1000 posts by a normal person.
     
  11. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Senior member

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    No, no. I just meant in general. It's nice to have threads like these (good quality images, historical significance) occasionally to remember how inspiring great clothing can be.

    I was just kidding.

    That isn't particularly fair to the Italians, since the country itself is a remarkably recent creation.

    The people of renaissance Italy seemed drawn more to fine art than clothing, anyhow. The Britons never matched them in that regard.


    I wasn't trying to be fair or unfair, just accurate.

    If this is the manifesto, I'll sign. It's a good (if mildly provocative) way to put it. I reach for Italian clothes as much as anything these days, in part precisely because they are less loaded and complicated and, hence, more easily understood. English tailoring can be downright odd and perplexing and I guess that's largely because it draws from a deeper well of both experience and creativity. One may be the master; the other the facile pupil and craftsman.

    Am I walking the line?


    Yes, you are. I think that what explains it is that English city and country tailoring arose from a stable anthill culture, with forms that were mature, settled, and geared to the complexities of class and position. Yet, even into the modern age, you can see an exuberance and verve to the English bespoke arts that are almost entirely absent from Italian bespoke makers.

    In contrast to the source, the Italians became oddly dour after their immitative period between the great wars.

    Yeah: I said that. Who wants to fight me?

    Man Good Heavens! I just realized you have 20000+ posts in 3 years? How do you manage this?

    Even more startling, 93% of those posts were within the last three months. I have already contacted the authorities, and they are sending the white van for him.

    BTW Kudos to Vox for posting these. Good images, although many are impractical for us but still a visual treat.

    My pleasure.

    - B
     
  12. No.XIII

    No.XIII Member

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    Sooo... maanyyy... niceeee... sartorial... pieces...under..a... roof
    Must...resist...living.. with.. the.. mannequins.. [​IMG]

    Thanks for sharing, Vox! The sight of morning coats and redingotes makes my heart melt.
     
  13. axe

    axe Senior member

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    I wasn't trying to be fair or unfair, just accurate.
    No worries, I was just trying to flesh out the possible historical explanations for your observation (which I agree with, FWIW, although its conclusion seems counter-intuitive at first glance)
     
  14. oscarthewild

    oscarthewild Senior member

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    TOKYO ,,, [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] - B
    These tweed suits are amazing. Any chance of a close up? -
     
  15. uppercase

    uppercase Senior member

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    It's not an A&S if it doesn't have closed front quarters.

    This 'Astaire' model was specifically made for Pitti Uomo a few years ago for display on a mannequin, to relate the A&S legacy to its former client Fred Astaire and for promotional purposes at a trade show.

    If you like the Astaire cut, you like something other than A&S because this isn't what A&S makes.

    What you like is a Neapolitan drape cut made in beautiful English cloth.

    And you are right, the Astaire is a beautiful coat. I tried it on at A&S in its basted form and it is magnificent though certainly not as open as it appears in the photo.

    I have never seen A&S subsequently produce another Astaire but only the default closed, straight, louche London sack.

    However, if you want this silhouette with its dramatic curves, life and movement, the only place I know to find it is Naples.

    The English cannot make it: their joints are too stiff and they think linearly.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I get open quarter drape from an English tailor. No problem.
     
  17. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Senior member

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    It's not an A&S if it doesn't have closed front quarters.

    That's what my guy said, although it wasn't the quarters that made him say that. He did say that if one of the departed head cutters at A&S saw it, they would have put the "shears through it."

    I have never seen A&S subsequently produce another Astaire but only the default closed, straight, louche London sack.

    You should see one shortly since whnay asked for this cut. We'll se...

    However, if you want this silhouette with its dramatic curves, life and movement, the only place I know to find it is Naples.

    The English cannot make it: their joints are too stiff and they think linearly.

    [​IMG]


    Hmmm...

    [​IMG]

    ...not A&S...


    - B
     
  18. PandArts

    PandArts Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  19. manofstyle

    manofstyle Senior member

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    However, if you want this silhouette with its dramatic curves, life and movement, the only place I know to find it is Naples.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Hmmm... [​IMG] ...not A&S... - B
    But with stiff joints. Nice stiff joints, like an old English codger back in town for the day.
     

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