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If you could only have one blazer what would it be?

MRAnd

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For a man who has a very casual lifestyle, even more so now, what is one blazer/sportcoat you would choose?
I was thinking of Navy, but am more drawn to a lighter, brighter blue to have it feel less office-like and because I live in a warmer climate and Navy sometimes seems a bit dark and heavy, especially in the daytime. Ideally want something that I can wear for up to 10 years without it looking dated.
Recommendations on brands, fabric, construction, etc. appreciated. Budget is around $1,000.

As a bonus, what is the second blazer/sportcoat you'd own?
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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Yes, navy.

Construction will depend on your body type. Some people look better in a slightly more padded jacket; others in a softer jacket.

If you can bump your budget up to $1,500 for a sport coat, I recommend No Man Walks Alone's Sartoria Cararra line or The Armoury's Model 3.

If $1,000 is a hard budget, then there's Spier & Mackay.

For a second sport coat, I would do a brown tweed in a subtle pattern, such as Donegal or herringbone. If you live in a very warm climate, then I would do a brown wool-silk-linen blend in a chunky and airy plain weave.
 

Phileas Fogg

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If one, navy hopsack. Unlined, 2 button and dual vented.

As a second, that then depends on what would be most useful to you given your social life, profession and how you would wear it.
 

TheIronDandy

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From my personal collection, if I could only keep one: 490g navy flannel, heavy canvas, single button (this is a personal preference, all my jackets are single button), notch lapels 10cm wide, flap pockets. Extended, rounded shoulder.

This was bespoke (and cloth from Fox brothers) so quite above your budget, but if I could own only one of my jackets, that would be the one.

If I had to start from scratch, using your budget, I would save up an extra 100-200 and go to Cad&The Dandy and get exactly the same jacket made bespoke, but with a less hyped up fabric. I could get that for 1100-1200.

My second one would be a similar one, but made from a Marling&Evans undyed wool tweed, woven in a subtle diamond pattern in dark brown and black. Also doable for 1200 from Cad.

But this is based on living in Sweden, where heavy flannel and tweed is wearable 3 seasons (and quite often part of the 4th as well). With your conditions, I would go with Phileas Fogg's suggestion above and change the flannel for hopsack. Still navy. Navy is the most flexible color for a jacket, if you want to brighten it up you can wear it with cream trousers (or if you're the type, bright white jeans). But you can't really tone down a brighter shade of blue by wearing darker trousers. For a second jacket in your situation, I'd probably go for Irish linnen, tobacco, patch pockets.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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Will caveat this by saying that, as a practical matter, nearly all this info is arcane, even by enthusiast standards. Most people will just see you in a sport coat -- some might not even be able to distinguish the difference between a suit jacket and a sport coat. So take this as you will.

Since the OP said he lives a very casual lifestyle, it might be useful to review what goes into the formality of a coat.



tumblr_olqvxrBI8M1rf1jvro1_1280.jpg
tumblr_p039pceIUJ1rf1jvro1_1280.jpg



I think the easiest way to conceptualize this is by remembering that evening clothes sit at the top of the formality pyramid (technically, white tie is more formal, but it's all but disappeared).

The classic dinner jacket is a single-breasted coat with peak lapels, jetted pockets, and a single button for fastening. Just under this in terms of formality is the double-breasted dinner jacket with the same configuration, or a single-breasted coat with a shawl collar. (The differences here are subtle and nuanced, but essentially – a full dress vest and stiff collar will go with a single-breasted, peak lapel jacket in a way that they won’t with other styles).



tumblr_nkadb7T9pt1qa2j8co1_1280.jpg



The closer your jacket approaches traditional evening wear, the more formal it’s considered. So notched lapels will look less formal than peaks or shawls. Two buttons are less formal than one (and three less formal than two). Welted flapped pockets are less formal than jetted. Patch pockets less formal still. And flapped patch least formal of all.

Italians sometimes add their own casual details – prominent pick stitching along the lapels and pockets; shirring at the sleevehead (aka spalla camicia); and fewer buttons at the sleeves (four is traditional, but sometimes three, two, or even one button is used to make a sport coat look more casual).


EEWij7IX4AAUQBI.jpeg
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For a navy sport coat that's very casual, I would do:

- Navy hopsack or serge (hopsack is a plain weave, serge is a twill). If you live in a very warm climate, Mock Leno may be better, but it's typically only available in custom tailoring. Mock Leno is very breathable.

- Patch pockets (if you want to move it slightly up in terms of formality, get welted).

- 3 roll 2 (if you're an American, this should be a matter of national pride)

- Contrast buttons if you want. Contrast buttons in MOP (white or smoked) or metal (silver or brass) can make a navy sport coat look more casual. However, many people prefer the more subtle look of matte brown horn.

- Dual or single vents, your choice. I do dual, but hook is more American

- Single-breasted for versatility

- Notch lapel

- Swelled edge

Many of the construction details, such as the shoulder construction, chest construction, etc will feed into the silhouette, which will be a matter of your body type and style. Some people look better in a slightly padded coat; others are better in a very soft construction.
 
Last edited:

MRAnd

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Thank you.
Will caveat this by saying that, as a practical matter, nearly all this info is arcane, even by enthusiast standards. Most people will just see you in a sport coat -- some might not even be able to distinguish the difference between a suit jacket and a sport coat. So take this as you will.

Since the OP said he lives a very casual lifestyle, it might be useful to review what goes into the formality of a coat.



View attachment 1595849View attachment 1595848


I think the easiest way to conceptualize this is by remembering that evening clothes sit at the top of the formality pyramid (technically, white tie is more formal, but it's all but disappeared).

The classic dinner jacket is a single-breasted coat with peak lapels, jetted pockets, and a single button for fastening. Just under this in terms of formality is the double-breasted dinner jacket with the same configuration, or a single-breasted coat with a shawl collar. (The differences here are subtle and nuanced, but essentially – a full dress vest and stiff collar will go with a single-breasted, peak lapel jacket in a way that they won’t with other styles).



View attachment 1595845


The closer your jacket approaches traditional evening wear, the more formal it’s considered. So notched lapels will look less formal than peaks or shawls. Two buttons are less formal than one (and three less formal than two). Welted flapped pockets are less formal than jetted. Patch pockets less formal still. And flapped patch least formal of all.

Italians sometimes add their own casual details – prominent pick stitching along the lapels and pockets; shirring at the sleevehead (aka spalla camicia); and fewer buttons at the sleeves (four is traditional, but sometimes three, two, or even one button is used to make a sport coat look more casual).


View attachment 1595851View attachment 1595854View attachment 1595855View attachment 1595856

For a navy sport coat that's very casual, I would do:

- Navy hopsack or serge (hopsack is a plain weave, serge is a twill). If you live in a very warm climate, Mock Leno may be better, but it's typically only available in custom tailoring. Mock Leno is very breathable.

- Patch pockets (if you want to move it slightly up in terms of formality, get welted).

- 3 roll 2 (if you're an American, this should be a matter of national pride)

- Contrast buttons if you want. Contrast buttons in MOP (white or smoked) or metal (silver or brass) can make a navy sport coat look more casual. However, many people prefer the more subtle look of matte brown horn.

- Dual or single vents, your choice. I do dual, but hook is more American

- Single-breasted for versatility

- Notch lapel

- Swelled edge

Many of the construction details, such as the shoulder construction, chest construction, etc will feed into the silhouette, which will be a matter of your body type and style. Some people look better in a slightly padded coat; others are better in a very soft construction.
Extremely helpful.
 

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