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Idiots in job interviews

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Eason, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. sinnedk

    sinnedk Senior member

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    actually dude it was not silly question at all, i was simply inquiring why interviewees see you getting out of a car, meaning why arent you in an office waiting for an interview, the fact that you didnt understand that my question was serious (i admit a bit sarcastic) is not my fault, so by you answering with randomness you made yourself look like a creeper

    good stuff murderous craigslist interviewer
     
  2. stevent

    stevent Senior member

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    so much :facepalm: in this thread
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

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    You gotta admit, the question about the abandoned warehouse was a bit silly! Your first question wasn't, though. To answer seriously, this was a second interview. I'm in academia, where second interviews take place on campus. At the end of the day, the interviewers and the candidate go out to dinner (which is still part of the interview, although less formal.) It is in that context that the applicant saw my car and scoffed at it.
     
  4. sinnedk

    sinnedk Senior member

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    you know if you wrote this right away, there would of been no serial killer discussion in the first place
     
  5. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

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    I think there was an episode of the original Star Trek where the crew encountered a race of people who understood all linguistic expressions at face value. (I never watch Star Trek, but I've been told there's such an episode.) That was probably a pretty funny episode.
     
  6. passingtime

    passingtime Senior member

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    I would add try and make it look like you want to work there:
    * Know what the company does
    * Have some idea about what the position entails (although a good question is how the vacancy came to exist)
    * Have to decency to at least pretend that you are gagging to work here.

    Generally I would say:
    * Have a folder for notes and questions you want to ask (it makes you look engaged).
    * Wear at least a jacket and tie. Contrary to what you might read in these forums nobody cares what you wear beyond that (although avoid novelty ties)
    * Don't badmouth your previous employer, you are always leaving them with regret since this is such a wonderful opportunity...
    * Emphasis on collaborative approach, teamwork, that sort of stuff.
    * Have some questions to ask, or look at your folder and tell them you had questions but they have covered them all.

    On a personal note:
    * Try to avoid interviewing on a Friday - it means I have to be in the office and I would rather not be.
    * You can screw up initially or have a bad appearance and still get the job if you can demonstrate actual relevant experience.
    * I don't care about thank you letters, once I have told HR what I think my interest in you is over unless you get the job (in which case it's not going to matter anyway).
     
  7. Texasmade

    Texasmade Senior member

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    I would say if Friday is the only day to interview, you better try to schedule your interview in the morning. Scheduling to have your interview Friday after lunch is asking not to get hired.
     
  8. Philip

    Philip Senior member

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    Damn that is rude, also said person must be deluded if they think they'll have enough dough to drive something fancy in academia. What positions do you normally interview for?
     
  9. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Lol, maybe you should have them drive.
     
  10. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

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    I'm just interviewing for faculty positions in the humanities. I'm not interviewing candidates for the chancellor position or anything like that. So yeah, the people I participate in hiring aren't going to make really big money.

    This is nothing more than anecdata I've collected, but IME people who pursue Ph.D.'s in my field often come from fairly well-off families. A lot of them have better cars in grad school than I have now. I don't think the candidate was really trying to be an ass; I think he genuinely couldn't believe I was driving that car. That doesn't make it any less of a faux pas, of course. It really pissed me off.
     
  11. Nereis

    Nereis Senior member

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    Some people in academia, despite extensive education/qualifications, seem to have a disconcerting ivory tower concept of the world. These are quite literally trust fund babies who grew up with multiple vacation homes and cannot understand that a nice car, rather than a must-have, is a rather bad investment and quite a bit down on the list of priorities.

    Was this candidate coming straight from undergrad to grad school and then to a PhD program? This might explain the lack of awareness of just what 'normal people' do with their money.

    It may also help explain the complete lack of social mores that one would have developed quickly if they had worked before.
     
  12. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I've had a couple of funny ones -

    this one guy, he interviewed well, and then I asked our HR woman to come in and ask a few questions and within a few questions he started talking about his religious beliefs and trying to get us to embrace them. it was weird, like a fast trigger and he just exploded into craziness

    recently I interviewed some people in a hotel lobby at an airport. everyone knew that I was intervewing more than one person. at 10 am, I was still with my 9 am and didn't see the 10 am guy. I stand up, walk around the lobby, nobody makes eye contact with me, I go back to my 9 am and we keep talking. I do the same after about 10 minutes, then again 10 minutes later. at 1040 I say goodbye to my 9 am (who I ended up hiring) and walk ouf of the hotel with my bags and head to the attached airport, check in and go through passport control and security. at 11:30 the 10 am guy calls me, he was in the lobby the whole time but dind't want to interupt me. he saw me leave and still didn't want to interupt me. this is for a sales managment position.


    my sister is horrible with this shit - she is in dire straights, a while back she was invited for a job interview on the day of her wedding anniversary and she had already made plans with her husband to celebrate so she told the interviewer she couldn't come in that day. he told her that he would then schdule somebody else, but that they had decided to make an offer to the first person that they liked, and she never got called back for the interview. another interview called her in (for an education position) and after a short interview they asked her to go to the different classrooms and talk to the teachers and get impressions of what was going on to discuss. the lack fo structure pissed her off so she walked around and didn't interact with anybody, and then said something more or less like "what was the point of that?" to the guy who had planned the interview.
     
  13. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Passingtime has some very good points. If you bad mouth your former employers and/or supervisors what do your perspective employers and supervisors think you're going to say about them in the future? If you do not know what my organization does, why I am hiring you, there is no reason to hire you. If you do not show up on time, are not dressed well, and do not know how to act in an interview why should I expect you to show up for your job on time, well dressed, and able to act appropriately on the job?
     
  14. JayJay

    JayJay Senior member

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    If I introduce myself as, say, Robert, then don't call me Bob throughout the interview. It's rude, and I won't hire you.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2012
  15. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

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    I don't actually know the answer to that question. I do think it's interesting, though, how much our social and economic classes of origin shape our spontaneous responses to situations. I grew up in a very poor, rural family, for example. When I got out into the wider world, I was talking with someone who was complaining that the city we were in lacked good museums. I was genuinely confused: I honestly had no idea that people would spend money to see paintings and historical artifacts. That money had to be saved for things like rent and groceries!


    This kind of thing never ceases to amaze me. The job market in my line of work is brutal. (Not unique to my line of work, of course.) The people I'm interviewing almost certainly need the job very badly. And yet I see them getting all judgmental about us and our interview process, as if we really need them and not vice versa. My rule of thumb is that if you can't get through the 50 minutes of the interview without being an ass, there's no way you'll get through years of being my colleague without being an ass.
     
  16. Blackhood

    Blackhood Senior member

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    There is a similar attitude in the Aviation World; You're only cut out to be a Pilot when I can sit next to you for 10 hours then still want to grab a beer at the bar with you.
     
  17. cptjeff

    cptjeff Senior member

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    As somebody living in (well, near) DC, people pay money for museums? :p
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2012
  18. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

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    :mad:
     
  19. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    +1

    my sister graduated from grad school 12 years ago, she's had 4 or 5 jobs in a field where you are supposed to have jobs for no less than 5 years each, and she still doesn't get that she has an attitude problem. fuck it, I am going to be supporting her for the rest of my life....
     
  20. Fuuma

    Fuuma Senior member

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    Some people in finance, despite extensive education/qualifications, seem to have a disconcerting ivory tower concept of the world. These are quite literally trust fund babies who grew up with multiple vacation homes and cannot understand that a nice car, rather than a must-have, is a rather bad investment and quite a bit down on the list of priorities.
    Was this candidate coming straight from undergrad to mba and then to an investment bank? This might explain the lack of awareness of just what 'normal people' do with their money.
    It may also help explain the complete lack of social mores that one would have developed quickly if they had worked before.

    Some people in law, despite extensive education/qualifications, seem to have a disconcerting ivory tower concept of the world. These are quite literally trust fund babies who grew up with multiple vacation homes and cannot understand that a nice car, rather than a must-have, is a rather bad investment and quite a bit down on the list of priorities.
    Was this candidate coming straight from undergrad to law and then to a white shoe firm? This might explain the lack of awareness of just what 'normal people' do with their money.
    It may also help explain the complete lack of social mores that one would have developed quickly if they had worked before.

    etc.
     

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