Identify hat type

Discussion in 'Menswear Advice' started by gb1986, May 8, 2016.

  1. gb1986

    gb1986 New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    Hopefully, this is the right place to post this request. I was just wondering if anybody could identify
    what type of hat this is.

    [​IMG]

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  2. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    It is a flat-crown, flat-brim hat. I don't know the exact terminology, but this style was very popular in the 19th century. Just for fun, I had one made up for me, but I thought I looked kind of silly in it and relegated it to service as a rain hat.
     


  3. Clive Black

    Clive Black Member

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  4. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    I thought a "porkpie" in the modern usage had a narrower brim, higher crown and usually softer construction than the hats in the OP's posts.
     


  5. Clive Black

    Clive Black Member

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    From the cursory research that I have done, there is some variation in what qualifies as a "pork-pie hat", depending on the time period.

    I have included a screen shot from the ad which shows the hat from a different angle. The crown tip ( a.k.a. the top) of the hat is not completely flat. There is a crease along the edge. It is the presence of the crease that distinguishes it as a pork-pie hat. The pic posted by the OP is a still from the Stella Artois "Be Legacy" ad campaign. The short film/advert. is set in the early 1700's. I can only assume that the costumer attempted to dress the cast in a historically accurate attire as possible.

    There is conflicting information about when this style of hat first became known as a pork-pie hat. According to an online etymology website, there is documentation of the existence of pork pie, the food, as early as 1732. The earliest documentation of the term pork-pie hat was in 1855.



    .[​IMG]
    Also, here is a picture of a pork pie, courtesy of wikipedia. See the vague resemblance?

    Cheers,

    Clive
     


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