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"I wear what I like"

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by jiomitori, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. montecristo#4

    montecristo#4 Senior member

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    If you were in Nantucket and they had navy blue embroidered whales on them, they'd be very trad.
     
  2. VENDER

    VENDER Active Member

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    Of course, I state my rule not as a universal law. I mean, that generally, that's how it is. I'm very skeptical of those who elevate their clothes to a high moral ground: "Those other people, they dress to belong, while I dress to express my true self." Our true selves must be small things indeed, if they can be expressed by clothes.

    The clothes we wear, we wear for a purpose. Beyond protection from the elements and comfort, we want our clothes to evoke a reaction from others. Most of the time, to signal that we belong to some group. That group may not be who we are friends with.



    Point respected. I agree that many people dress to belong to a certain group. But, don't you feel in a society where looks and personal appearance weigh so heavily (as superficial and disgusting as it is), clothing magnifies our personal traits.
     
  3. mensimageconsultant

    mensimageconsultant Senior member

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    Sorry if this interrupting, but the subject is this company's specialty.

    To quote Conselle, "you cannot not communicate." Clothes always say something about the wearer, though it goes through observer filters and might not be what somebody wants to say. (People who realize they are communicating badly and don't know how to change it often become disinterested in style and sometimes even socially avoidant.)

    But clothing does not necessarily magnify traits. For example, it can be used to counter messages sent by the physique and face.

    Because of that and the complexity of personality, simple outfits like tee shirts with jeans (the default for many fashion-averse American men) often don't communicate effectively.
     
  4. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    I disagree. In fact, I would say that something simple and universally worn like a t-shirt and jeans, and which the majority of men are comfortable in, comunicates extremely effectively. The fit and brand of the jeans, the fit of the t-shirt and any graphics or embellishments on it, are much more likely to communicate someone's personality than, say, a suit and tie, which I would say the majority of men feel is a sort of costume.

    A guy in a relaxed fit plain tee and GAP jeans, a guy in embellished Diesel jeans and a tight ASOS tee, and a guy in a fitted Jil Sander tee and raw, slim jeans clearly belong to different "social tribes" and espouse different aesthetics.

    Sorry if this interrupting, but the subject is this company's specialty.

    To quote Conselle, "you cannot not communicate." Clothes always say something about the wearer, though it goes through observer filters and might not be what somebody wants to say. (People who realize they are communicating badly and don't know how to change it often become disinterested in style and sometimes even socially avoidant.)

    But clothing does not necessarily magnify traits. For example, it can be used to counter messages sent by the physique and face.

    Because of that and the complexity of personality, simple outfits like tee shirts with jeans (the default for many fashion-averse American men) often don't communicate effectively.
     
  5. Get Smart

    Get Smart Senior member

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    The fit and brand of the jeans, the fit of the t-shirt and any graphics or embellishments on it, are much more likely to communicate someone's personality than, say, a suit and tie, which I would say the majority of men feel is a sort of costume.

    A guy in a relaxed fit plain tee and GAP jeans, a guy in embellished Diesel jeans and a tight ASOS tee, and a guy in a fitted Jil Sander tee and raw, slim jeans clearly belong to different "social tribes" and espouse different aesthetics.


    true, but then you can have 3 guys wearing suits/tie and look completely different from one another, showing that the 3 suited guys have zero in common, socially. Whether or not anyone admits it, EVERYONE belongs to a social tribe of some sort. Even those who choose not to be "fashionable" are engaging in a fashion of sorts.
     
  6. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    true, but then you can have 3 guys wearing suits/tie and look completely different from one another, showing that the 3 suited guys have zero in common, socially. Whether or not anyone admits it, EVERYONE belongs to a social tribe of some sort. Even those who choose not to be "fashionable" are engaging in a fashion of sorts.

    I agree, but I think that a greater fraction of men are more comfortable in jeans and tees, and wear suits and ties only because their work requires it, so the suit and tie is a uniform, rather than an expression of personality. They couldn't care less, and it shows. On the other hand, they would wear jeans and tees given the choice, and so their choices in those articles show their personalities more. There are, of course, many exceptions to the rule (many of them on this board.)
     
  7. mensimageconsultant

    mensimageconsultant Senior member

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    I disagree. In fact, I would say that something simple and universally worn like a t-shirt and jeans, and which the majority of men are comfortable in, comunicates extremely effectively. The fit and brand of the jeans, the fit of the t-shirt and any graphics or embellishments on it, are much more likely to communicate someone's personality than, say, a suit and tie, which I would say the majority of men feel is a sort of costume.

    A guy in a relaxed fit plain tee and GAP jeans, a guy in embellished Diesel jeans and a tight ASOS tee, and a guy in a fitted Jil Sander tee and raw, slim jeans clearly belong to different "social tribes" and espouse different aesthetics.


    Hello,

    If a suit and tie is treated as uniform, then it probably will be less telling than t-shirt and jeans.

    T-shirt and jeans, however, are for most men "casual" in the sense of being convenient. Whatever is available at Wal-mart, whatever items in the closet are clean. T-shirt colors usually are bland and any designs muted.

    If very loose or tight, the fit of jeans communicates a lot. That is also true of t-shirts.

    Designer versus non-designer also sends messages.

    Many other clothing messages are not obvious to the average man. A problem with casual wear is semiotic "effectiveness." For example, it seldom communicates above-average intelligence or power.

    For maximum communication, there are outfits that are neither casual nor business uniform.
     
  8. Brian SD

    Brian SD Senior member

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    Part of the underlying focus of this board is rejecting the notion that t-shirts are comfortable and convenient. Wear everything you have like it was made to be worn that way. If it's torn up, old, if it's got short sleeves or long... Take the same item and wear it on two different days with different functions in mind, yet still wear it effectively to show you put that get-up on purposefully.

    The greatest and most difficult part is finding something that is uniquely your own, accepting and taking advantage of your imperfections and your old junk. Some people are afraid of wearing certain styles because they don't feel comfortable in something so different from their normal method of fashion. I saw a dude who worked at Barney's LA who was wearing a tight-ass waistcoat and dress trousers in trad colors, but he looked so self-conscious it was awful. A testament of wearing expensive and trendy clothing but not being able to pull it off.
     
  9. tangerine

    tangerine Senior member

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    ...

    Many other clothing messages are not obvious to the average man. A problem with casual wear is semiotic "effectiveness." For example, it seldom communicates above-average intelligence or power.

    ...


    It also seldom communicates arrogance, egotism or a sense of entitlement.
     
  10. Geowu

    Geowu Senior member

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    it's nice to hear ideas different than our own.

    for some circunstances there can be things better than t-shirt and denim, but they are good for everyday, relaxed environment.
     
  11. mensimageconsultant

    mensimageconsultant Senior member

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    For some people, "I wear what I like" means "I wear what I'm used to and am afraid to change." As a rule, style change for men works best as a gradual process. The stereotypical American male style of t-shirt and jeans is easily tweaked.
     

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