I want a milk tie!

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by guyver00, Nov 15, 2011.

  1. guyver00

    guyver00 Senior member

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  2. cptjeff

    cptjeff Senior member

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    :facepalm:

    Would it kill the author to keep the units consistent? It's a two sentence paragraph. Either it's two liters for the milk or 2,500 gallons for the cotton.


    As for the actual substance, neat. An artificial protein fiber is a pretty cool thing, especially how you can control the gauge of the fiber. Fibers as fine as the best cashmere or as thick and strong as the heaviest wools. It'll be interesting to see the economics of this develop, if this stuff can be cost effective at larger scales, it could be revolutionary.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2011
  3. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    Or just stop using archaic units like pound and gallon. Perhaps the author is from Burma.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2011
  4. Naka

    Naka Senior member

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    I wonder how much a spider-silk tie would cost...
     
  5. TomAlso

    TomAlso Active Member

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    Considering that there is only one piece of spider silk cloth in the world... probably too much for any of us here.
     
  6. Pawz

    Pawz Senior member

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  7. Sam Hober

    Sam Hober Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Interestingly Nicholas Storey and I have been working - very slowly on just such a project for a couple of years. He is in South America and has found some interesting spiders which he is trying to collect the silk from.

    We would then probably spin the silk into fabric here in Thailand on our fram as reeling may be too difficult, and then make ties.

    The cost of the ties will be very high.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2011
  8. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Is a pearl necklace the equivalent of a milk tie?
     
  9. guyver00

    guyver00 Senior member

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    :rotflmao:
     
  10. musicguy

    musicguy Senior member

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    Daffy's had a bunch of sweaters made out of this fabric. Felt like a soft thin cotton. The brand was, get this, Milk.
     
  11. Pawz

    Pawz Senior member

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    http://shine.yahoo.com/fashion/why-peta-upset-over-gold-cape-144100799.html

    Gist:

    You're looking at the largest item of clothing ever made from spider silk. This gold cape was a four-year project involving more than one million spiders. And not just any spiders. These guys are a rare species from Madagascar with golden filaments that produce the blindingly saffron product you see here.

    [​IMG]

    This fashion statement is currently on display at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. Actually, spider silk is a hot commodity in the art world right now. Last year, another, slightly less ambitious spider silk garment -- an 11-foot scarf -- was exhibited in museums from New York to London.

    Part of the fascination with the process comes from the craftsmanship. The scarf alone required a commitment from 70 people with the ability to work on machinery not really employed since the 19th century in France. But Madagascar spider silk also has some otherworldly properties. For instance, it's virtually weightless so it doesn't feel like anything. It's as close as you'll get to an invisibility cloak at this point. Amazingly, the material is also stronger than Kevlar. There's actually been research into developing a synthetic version for the military.
     
  12. jrd617

    jrd617 Senior member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2012

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