I have a jean...(The Ultimate Jean Thread For Beginners) - ask questions here.

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by whodini, Jan 28, 2008.

  1. Flight Bird

    Flight Bird Senior member

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    Is it true, as prepidemic says, that the longer the inseam on a model of jeans, the narrower the leg will be for two pairs with the same waist size. I like the 501 STF, but would like it to be slimmer in the leg (i know there are other options $$$). I'd be looking for the longest inseam, hopefully 40. Has anyone done this?

    OK, there's a secret way to get a fit for no extra cost!

    All you have to do is size down. (shhhh... it's a secret! [​IMG] )
     
  2. LukeZZ

    LukeZZ Well-Known Member

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    LukeZZ, maybe RRL slim bootcuts are what you want.
    Thanks again! Any idea where RRL slim bootcut can be found? I dont see them on the RL online store.
     
  3. Flight Bird

    Flight Bird Senior member

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    Thanks again! Any idea where RRL slim bootcut can be found? I dont see them on the RL online store.

    [​IMG], RRL store on Bleeker Street in NYC
     
  4. Flight Bird

    Flight Bird Senior member

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    I'm hoping to find some APC jeans in the philly area, does anyone know a store that stocks them?

    Sugarcube is the only store. Check sugarcube.us
     
  5. connor

    connor Senior member

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    jamays all of those will look alot better with a hem or cuff

    Is it true, as prepidemic says, that the longer the inseam on a model of jeans, the narrower the leg will be for two pairs with the same waist size. I like the 501 STF, but would like it to be slimmer in the leg (i know there are other options $$$). I'd be looking for the longest inseam, hopefully 40. Has anyone done this?

    as far as i know, no.

    I believe that is correct

    Here's redcast:

    [​IMG]

    and here's greencast:

    [​IMG]


    wrong wtf are you talkin bout? selvedge line doesnt mean shit as far as color cast, any denim could have a different tint to it

    Thanks again! Any idea where RRL slim bootcut can be found? I dont see them on the RL online store.

    rrl isnt sold online, check ebay or b&s on here
     
  6. Flight Bird

    Flight Bird Senior member

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    wrong wtf are you talkin bout? selvedge line doesnt mean shit as far as color cast, any denim could have a different tint to it

    I the selvage corresponds to the cast, but look carefully the red cast denim has red hue and the greencast a sea greenish hue.
     
  7. KitAkira

    KitAkira Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!

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    That looks like post-processing to me, and the selvedge line has nothing at all to do with the denim (KMW uses both a red- and blue-line selvedge for the exact same denim)
     
  8. connor

    connor Senior member

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    yeah man thats just a color balance issue with the photo
     
  9. KitAkira

    KitAkira Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!

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    That being said, you're right about the -cast being used to refer to color toned denim. Colors are added to the dye to correct or change colors (usually green or red are added to reach the desired hue), which is why many of the denimhead brands will wax poetic about how they don't add color to their dye ("pure indigo"). Then again, if the desired color isn't supposed to be like indigo, then the added coloration is perfectly fine (red- and green-cast denim).

    And another way to get a similar effect is to use colored weft threads (Acne did a Max with green weft that gave a slight green-cast without changing the warp threads)
     
  10. connor

    connor Senior member

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    or those cool purple ones PBJ (i think) did
     
  11. dissapointedengineer

    dissapointedengineer Active Member

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    this is in all likelihood stupid but i'll proceed anyway:

    1) ordered a pair of Sams through a proxy.
    2) tracked the order via EMS this morning and got:

    Jun 25 11:09 Arrival at inward office of exchange United States of America Chicago
    Jun 25 11:10 In Customs United States of America Chicago

    3) ????
    4) rock sams

    haven't made it past step 2 just yet..
    assume i'll have to pay a tax upon delivery?
     
  12. Pablo-T

    Pablo-T Senior member

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    That being said, you're right about the -cast being used to refer to color toned denim. Colors are added to the dye to correct or change color
    In the main, I don't think blue cast or red cast is achieved with added dyes. It's all indigo, and how you use it, although plenty of other factors can play their part. Historically, early, natural indigo denim was more green cast; synthetic denim was more red-cast. The differences in hue probably came because earlier denim was dyed differently, perhaps more dips in a weaker indigo solution. You can certainly add a cast by adding sulphur, for instance a yellow sulhur bottom, which would be used a lot on high street jeans, or by varying the colour of the fill yarn - you can tint it, use cotton that's more ecru, etc. But, in the main, on higher-end jeans the green or red cast comes from how you use your indigo. Lee and especially Wrangler denim is historically more green-cast than Levi's. Here we have the LVC 1920s 201, with what I'd call a greencast denim, made by Kurabo. This denim is actually synthetic, but it gives a very good replication of a natural indigo look. Then there's a more red-cast 1901 501, below. I tried to photograph these next to each other, but it's impossible to make the different hue come out. [​IMG][​IMG] As for new pairs, here's a pair of Edwin made 30s Lee 101B, a greencast, on the left, and a pair f Valencia St 1955 501 on the right. Redcast denim, in the main, starts out darker, I'd say. [​IMG]
     
  13. KitAkira

    KitAkira Wait! Wait! I gots an opinion!

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    In the main, I don't think blue cast or red cast is achieved with added dyes. It's all indigo, and how you use it, although plenty of other factors can play their part. Historically, early, natural indigo denim was more green cast; synthetic denim was more red-cast. The differences in hue probably came because earlier denim was dyed differently, perhaps more dips in a weaker indigo solution. You can certainly add a cast by adding sulphur, for instance a yellow sulhur bottom, which would be used a lot on high street jeans, or by varying the colour of the fill yarn - you can tint it, use cotton that's more ecru, etc. But, in the main, on higher-end jeans the green or red cast comes from how you use your indigo. Lee and especially Wrangler denim is historically more green-cast than Levi's. Here we have the LVC 1920s 201, with what I'd call a greencast denim, made by Kurabo. This denim is actually synthetic, but it gives a very good replication of a natural indigo look. Then there's a more red-cast 1901 501, below. I tried to photograph these next to each other, but it's impossible to make the different hue come out. As for new pairs, here's a pair of Edwin made 30s Lee 101B, a greencast, on the left, and a pair f Valencia St 1955 501 on the right. Redcast denim, in the main, starts out darker, I'd say.
    Not a dye-history expert (aka ringring) but: Natural indigo has a greener tinge to it due to the fermentation, and, to a point, iirc more fermentation equates to a greener dye (or it could be the oxidation stage, don't remember). But the dye itself is a brownish color and actually can contain a lot of red impurities that show up in the yarn. Synthetic indigo doesn't have these impurities, so reds were added to get that coloration (same as green being added to reproduce the greener end of the indigo spectrum)
     
  14. Pablo-T

    Pablo-T Senior member

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    Not a dye-history expert (aka ringring) but:
    Natural indigo is exactly the same chemical composition as synthetic; the brown appearance does not have an effect on the colour, once the indigo has oxidised. However, most natural indigo would have indirubin and other impurities, some of which were claimed to add a unique tinge, as natural indigo producers tried to preserve their business against the cheaper, more reliable new product.

    Synthetic indigo, from the 1910s to the 50s, was used pretty much straight, with no other dyes added - at least by the main manufacturers, like Cone and Erwin. THe main element synthetic indigo manufacturers used to add, in the early days, were artificial malodorants to make their product smell more like the familiar version.

    THe 201 shown above have a tinted fill yarn, but according to the developer, the cast comes in the main from how the indigo is applied.

    I'm intrigued to know if any of the high end manufacturers do add anything to give a more red cast, I'll ask a dye history expert who owes me a coffee soon.
     
  15. yleb33

    yleb33 Member

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    well from someone whom actually does it, the cast has little to nothing to do with the indigo, organic or synthetic. The changes, cast, tints, or shades of whatever are the result of modifiers and mordants. Iron will give a sad dull yet deeper blue, Copper will give sadden green tinted blues, Tin will give lighter more vibrant blues. And if too much chalk or thiox is added a pink or reddish cast will be present. This is no matter natural or synthetic indigo is used. Plus, don't the hype these brands try to sell you on, the dip process is the same in principle no matter who does it. And the list of mordants and modifiers is truly never ending.
     

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